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Association for Behavior Analysis International

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44th Annual Convention; San Diego, CA; 2018

CE by Content: Ethics


 

Workshop #W9
CE Offered: PSY/BACB — 
Ethics
Standing Up for Science: Ethical Challenges and Opportunities for Behavior Analysts in the Autism Community
Thursday, May 24, 2018
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Manchester Grand Hyatt, Coronado Ballroom AB
Area: AUT/CSS; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: David A. Celiberti, Ph.D.
DAVID A. CELIBERTI (Association for Science in Autism Treatment), ERIN S. LEIF (Lizard Centre)
Description: There are literally hundreds of interventions for autism, although the vast majority of these lack any scientific support. Unfortunately, approaches that are not grounded in science prevail in many schools and centers, fringe treatments are afforded widespread media coverage distracting consumers and separating individuals with autism from science-based intervention such as ABA, and the internet is filled with misinformation and unsubstantiated claims. This presents ethical challenges and opportunities for behavior analysts. Science and scientific methods are not only relevant to discussions surrounding autism treatment selection but should serve as the foundation upon which treatments should be chosen, implemented, and evaluated. This workshop will highlight the role that behavior analysts can play in helping consumers, consultees, supervisees and other colleagues choose interventions, implement those interventions with high degrees of fidelity and transparent, as well as in objectively evaluating outcomes. Strategies for promoting science and the scientific method in both practice and in communication will be discussed throughout the workshop.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) identify and describe red flags in autism treatment, common media misrepresentations and diverse perspectives on treatment selection and explain the ethical concerns that result; (2) demonstrate a broader conceptualization of how the tenets of applied behavior analysis can be both a model and a framework for delivering science-based educations and treatment regardless of discipline and highlight the implications conceptually and procedurally; (3) describe challenges for behavior analysts related to interdisciplinary collaboration, consumer education, and interacting with members of the media community and describe strategies for avoiding or reducing the impact of these challenges; (4) identify specific and sustainable contributions that can be made to promote science in the treatment of autism across disciplines, within interactions with the media community and consumers.
Activities: Instructional strategies will include lecture, small group exercises, and follow up feedback and discussion. Original source material from the media will be incorporated in the exercises.
Audience: The workshop level is intermediate but would be suitable for behavior analytic teaching faculty, BCBAs involved in supervision and consultation, as well as BCBAs working in inter-disciplinary teams.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W17
CE Offered: PSY/BACB/QABA/NASP — 
Ethics
Behavior Analysis of Seizures
Thursday, May 24, 2018
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Manchester Grand Hyatt, Mission Beach A-C
Area: DDA/DEV; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: John C. Neill, Ph.D.
JOHN C. NEILL (Long Island University)
Description: Up to 50% of individuals with severe developmental disabilities have epilepsy. Remarkably, behavior analysts are often unaware how epilepsy impairs their client's ability to learn and remember contingencies of reinforcement. Individuals with epilepsy often have behavior disorders which can be exacerbated by seizures. These seizures could be managed better, and important new life skills could be acquired, if their behavior analyst knew more about epilepsy. This workshop will educate behavior analysts about epilepsy with a behavioral approach. A basic review of neuroanatomy, neurophysiology and molecular events responsible for seizures and seizure-induced impairments in learning and behavior will be provided. The etiology, genetics and classification of various seizure disorders will be reviewed. Behavioral research on several animal models of seizures will be related to human cases. A frequent problem for developmentally disabled clients is that they are improperly medicated for seizures. This could be avoided with EEG (electroencephalography), which is a crucial test for accurate diagnosis of epilepsy. Workshop participants will learn how to prepare a client for cooperating with the EEG, without sedation or anesthesia. Participants will learn how epileptic seizures change an individual's ability to operate on their environment. Conversely, the environment often modulates seizures. Behavior analysts will benefit their clients who have epilepsy by learning about how to describe, measure and control these relationships.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) Define an epileptic seizure; (2) Describe some of the developmental and neurological events responsible for epileptic seizures; (3) Recognize the importance of measuring the effects of seizures on learning and behavior; (4) Objectively describe, count and time seizures in relation to environmental conditions; (5) Recognize the importance of reviewing a client's history to determine etiology, and its particular impact on behavioral progress.; (6) Recognize the effects of the environment on epileptic seizures; (7) Know how to prepare a client for cooperating with EEG tests, without sedation or anesthesia; (8) Discriminate pseudoepileptic versus epileptic seizures; (9) Manage learning and behavior disorders effectively in clients with epilepsy; (10) Explain some recent research on epilepsy and behavior analysis; (11) Explain how the environment can decrease abnormal brain activity and seizures.
Activities: Lecture and video presentations will alternate with discussions of key topics and audience questions and experiences regarding epileptic and non-epileptic behaviors.
Audience: Applied behavior analysts, special education teachers, psychologists and therapists who write behavior plans for individuals with developmental disabilities, including epilepsy.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): autism, developmental disabilities, epilepsy, seizures
 
Workshop #W18
CE Offered: BACB — 
Ethics
An Ethical Approach to Addressing Problem Behavior in School Settings
Thursday, May 24, 2018
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Manchester Grand Hyatt, Harbor Ballroom B
Area: EDC/PRA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Stacey M. McIntyre, M.A.
MEGAN B. BOUCHER (The Ivymount School), STACEY M. MCINTYRE (Ivymount School)
Description: Behavior modification can be effective at reducing problem behavior. However, the use of arbitrarily selected reinforcers is no longer recommended as best practice. Using functional assessments to inform behavioral intervention produces treatments that are practical, ethical, and effective. Federal mandates require school personnel to conduct Functional Behavior Assessments and write Behavior Intervention Plans when problem behaviors impede students' educational performance. Many articles written to provide practical guidelines to school personnel include recommending multiple treatment components that create complex BIPs and can impact treatment effectiveness. This workshop will highlight a resource-efficient model for addressing problem behavior using function-based and non-function based approaches and the related ethical considerations (e.g., least restrictive environment, safety, treatment effectiveness, preference and staff training). Participants will discriminate between function-based and non-function-based treatment and identify the advantages and barriers to each. Also, participants will identify the key features of each tier in a Multi-Tier System of Supports framework and determine when to move to the next tier of intervention.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) Identify the utility of a multi-tier system of supports framework within a school setting; (2) Identify universal supports that promote appropriate behavior (i.e., tier 1 intervention); (3) Identify when to move to behavioral interventions at tiers 2 and 3; (4) Discriminate between and identify advantages and barriers to: non-function based behavior intervention plan (BIP) and function-based BIP; (5) Identify and apply the ethics associated with function and non-function based treatment development.
Activities: Instructional strategies include: lecture, discussion, small group breakout
Audience: BCBAs, BCaBAs, BCBA-Ds, school psychologists and other behavior analytic providers working in a public or private school setting.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): function-based treatment, LRE, PBIS, staff training
 
Workshop #W26
CE Offered: BACB — 
Ethics
Recognizing and Dealing With Everyday Ethical Dilemmas in the Workplace
Thursday, May 24, 2018
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Marriott Marquis, Presidio 2
Area: PRA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Richard B. Graff, Ph.D.
RICHARD B. GRAFF (May Institute)
Description: Behavior analytic practitioners encounter potential ethical dilemmas in the workplace on a regular basis. Some of these issues are fairly straightforward, and experienced BCBAs can deal with these situations fairly easily. However, on occasion, more difficult and complex ethical situations arise. Recognizing and dealing effectively with these situations is a critical skill that all behavior analysts must have. This presentation begins with a review of some common ethical dilemmas that can arise in the workplace. Then, we will review how to assess whether or not an issue rises to the level of being considered an ethical violation. We will review some strategies for evaluating the complexity of the situation, which may dictate if the behavior analyst has the ability to resolve the situation on their own, or if additional resources would be needed. We will also review the steps necessary to deal with a complex ethical dilemma. Finally, attendees will work in teams to develop potential solutions to hypothetical ethical dilemmas. Understanding how to recognize and deal with complex ethical issues will not only help you protect your clients, but will help to protect you as well.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to (1) describe at least five common ethical situations that can arise in the workplace; (2) describe one strategy for classifying the complexity of an ethical dilemma; (3) describe the steps necessary for effectively navigating a complex ethical dilemma.
Activities: Instructional strategies include: lecture, discussion, and small group breakout
Audience: This workshop is designed for behavior analyst practitioners.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W27
CE Offered: BACB — 
Ethics
Not the Same Old Ethics Talk
Thursday, May 24, 2018
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Manchester Grand Hyatt, Seaport Ballroom H
Area: PRA/PCH; Domain: Theory
CE Instructor: Cheryl J. Davis, Ph.D.
MARY ROSSWURM (LittleStar ABA Therapy), CHERYL J. DAVIS (7 Dimensions Consulting; SupervisorABA), MEGAN MILLER (Navigation Behavioral Consulting)
Description: Ethics, values and morals: these words have become synonymous and frequently overused in today's world and our profession. While most BCBAs know the code and feel they would make the correct decision in the face of an ethical dilemma, research has shown that most wouldn't if doing so would put them at a disadvantage. This workshop will distinguish the differences between ethics, values, character, morals and virtues and explore how they fit into the social contract that we all live in. We will briefly look at the teachings of Socrates, Plato and Aristotle and the roots of Western ethics and how children develop morals. We will explore how ethical decision making is a task we are faced with many times each day, but personal ethics vary so widely from person to person (think extra marital affairs, lying on personal tax forms, driving while intoxicated, just to name a few), yet many professionals are expected to follow and live by strict ethical codes in their business life. How does one balance this paradox? We will explore a doomsday theory of decision making and talk about some interesting literature on ethics from the business and leadership journals, which is very pertinent to our field. We will chat briefly about ethical dilemmas going on in the world around us and why so much attention has been given to ethics over the past seven to 10 years. This workshop takes a deep dive into ethics, explores why living by the code is so important for our field and the people we serve and shares strategies to help participants make the best decision the next time they are faced with a difficult issue. It is assumed that the attendee is already very familiar with the BACBs Professional and Ethical Compliance Code.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) Define and differentiate ethics, values, character, morals and virtues; (2) Work through a "doomsday" process of decision making when faced with an ethical dilemma in order to calculate as many outcomes as possible; (3) Recognize the paradox between personal and professional ethics; (4) Recall appropriate strategies to assist in making the best decision when faced with a difficult issue.
Activities: Instructional strategies include: lecture, discussion, small group breakout, and videos.Supplemental materials of concepts presented will be provided in order to support participant learning and use after workshop is over.
Audience: Basic
Content Area: Theory
Instruction Level: Basic
Keyword(s): ethics, morals, The Code, values
 
Workshop #W28
CE Offered: BACB — 
Ethics
Practical and Ethical Methodologies for Assessing Function of Problematic Behaviors in the Natural Environment
Thursday, May 24, 2018
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Marriott Marquis, Torrey Pines 3
Area: PRA/DDA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Paulo Guilhardi, Ph.D.
PAULO GUILHARDI (Beacon ABA Services, Inc.), ROBERT K. ROSS (Beacon ABA Services), ASHLEY DOUGLAS (Beacon ABA Services )
Description: The workshop will focus on the use of direct observation tools to generate hypothesis regarding function with direct practice on a tool that is more accurate and efficient. Following the identification of hypothesis to be tested, the workshop will focus on alternative experimental methods to test a subset of hypothesized functions and involve teaching alternative responses and do not reinforce problematic behaviors. Conclusions derived from current functional assessment practices heavily rely on indirect methods for gathering data (e.g. FAST, MAS). When a function is experimentally tested, current practices pose ethical, practical and theoretical concerns. Both approaches are problematic in that indirect data produces inaccurate and imprecise data, and experimental methods are typically not driven by a hypothesis, directly reinforce problematic behaviors, and do not involve simultaneous establishment of appropriate alternative behaviors. The workshop will conclude with an argument to support (1) direct observation of consequences be used in place of indirect data to develop hypothesis and (2) use of use of alternative experimental methods such a free-operant and trial-based functional analysis procedures. The proposed methodology provides a more ethical, conceptually systematic, and practical assessment of function.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) Describe methods for raising hypothesis of function of problematic behaviors; (2) Collect data on consequences of problematic behaviors; (3) Develop functional analysis procedures to test hypothesis that do not reinforce problematic behaviors and teach functional alternative responses; (4) Conduct functional analysis; (5) Summarize functional assessment results.
Activities: Instructional strategies include: 1. Lecture 2. Discussion 3. Small group breakout- graphing and analysis activity 4. Video data collection exercise 5. Conduct of a mock functional assessment
Audience: Professionals responsible for conducting functional assessments and analysis providing services in schools, home, and community.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Direct Observation, FBA/Ethics, Free Operant, Trial Based
 
Workshop #W29
CE Offered: BACB/QABA — 
Ethics
Function-Based Restorative Justice Practices for Client Harm Reduction
Thursday, May 24, 2018
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Marriott Marquis, Rancho Santa Fe 3
Area: PRA/CSS; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Worner Leland, M.S.
WORNER LELAND (Upswing Advocates), JANANI VAIDYA (The Chicago School of Professional Psychology)
Description: When encountering a crisis situation, helping professionals may have legal and ethical responsibilities that seem to be in conflict with one another. For many helping professionals some degree of mandated reporting exists as a part of their professions'ethical guidelines, and many places of employment have crisis policies in place that involve calling the police. In the United States, an estimated one third to one half of people killed in police shootings have had physical, intellectual, or developmental disabilities (Perry & Carter-Long, 2016), and the intersections of clients'identities may heighten this danger. Punitive measures including and up to the involvement of law enforcement often do not account for behavior function and do not focus on habilitation or training functional replacement behaviors. Function based restorative justice practices can be one meaningful way to reduce harm to clients in situations of crisis. This workshop will provide an overview of restorative justice and will examine ways in which helping professionals can incorporate alternate interventions in moments of crisis to reduce risks and benefit their clients as much as possible. Empirically supported literature and data will be presented where applicable and available, and audience questions and discussion will be welcomed throughout the workshop.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will be able to: (1) state which guidelines in the Professional and Ethical Compliance Code for Behavior Analysts (BACB, 2014) are applicable to restorative justice, (2) state the key components of behavior escalation and best practices for intervention, (3) describe the costs and risks of punitive crisis intervention practices, (4) state the critical components of engaging in restorative justice practices, and (5) apply strategies from restorative justice models to reduce client harm in a case study.
Activities: Activities will include: Pre/post quizzes, lecture, small group discussion, FreeWrite exercises, and worksheets.
Audience: Audience: BCBA-D, BCBA, BCaBA, RBTs, or those training to be any of these who are interested in building their competence around the topic of function based restorative justice. Teachers, therapists, and other helping professionals are also welcome to attend.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
Keyword(s): behavior function, deescalation, restorative justice, transformative justice
 
Workshop #W50
CE Offered: BACB — 
Ethics
Special Education Law and Ethical Issues for Practicing Behavior Analysts
Friday, May 25, 2018
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
Manchester Grand Hyatt, Mission Beach A-C
Area: EDC/PRA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Melissa L. Olive, Ph.D.
MELISSA L. OLIVE (Applied Behavioral Strategies LLC)
Description: This day long workshop will focus on the Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act (IDEIA) and the issues that practicing behavior analyst should be apprised of. Participants will learn about federal requirements for conducting functional behavioral assessments, writing behavior intervention plans, understanding the term positive behavior supports as used in the IDEIA, and requirements for independent educational evaluations including FBAs. Information will be provided in lecture format with case studies as examples. The legal and ethical responsibilities of a behavior analyst will be discussed. Time will be allotted for extensive question and answer. Detailed handouts will be provided.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusionof the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) Identify the major components of the IDEIA; (2) Identify the areas of IDEIA that impact the practicing behavior analyst; (3) Identify the types of disabilities that behavior analysts may serve under IDEIA; (4) Identify the legal requirements of an Independent Educational Evaluation; (5) Identify when an FBA must be completed under the IDEIA; (6) Identify when a BIP must be developed under the IDEIA; (7) Identify how often data must be collected under the IDEIA; (8) Describe how the 2016 Professional and Ethical Compliance Code relates to SPED Law.
Activities: Lecture, Discussion, Case Study, Question and Answer
Audience: Practicing Behavior Analysts, Supervisors of Practicing Behavior Analysts, School Administrators
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Ethics, School Consultation, School Law
 
Workshop #W59
CE Offered: BACB — 
Ethics
Safe Assessment and Treatment After Adverse Experience: Using Evidence- and Function-Based Strategies in a Trauma-Informed Environment
Friday, May 25, 2018
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
Manchester Grand Hyatt, Regatta ABC
Area: PRA/CBM; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Teresa Camille Kolu, Ph.D.
TERESA CAMILLE KOLU (Cusp Emergence)
Description: Behavior analysts are increasingly tasked with providing "trauma-informed support" in educational, clinic based, day treatment, hospital and other settings. However, behavior analysts may be unprepared to collaborate effectively, document and manage risks, and apply behavioral principles appropriately to this population. Participants in this workshop will be armed with resources, tools and initial training that prepares them to discuss trauma and aversive histories in behavioral ways, collect data meaningful to behavior change in this sensitive population, and expand their repertoires to leverage their behavior analytic skills to support persons and their families who have faced adverse experiences. Workshop includes guided support and practice to generate individualized materials supporting individuals, families and teams who need trauma-informed behavioral support in home, educational and clinic settings. Participants will receive and practice using tools use to support ethical functional behavior assessment, risk documentation and assessment, and development of function- and evidence-based behavioral strategies that take into account an individual's conditioning and reinforcement history related to adverse events and previous environments. This workshop also discusses risks of local functional assessments that avoid assessing or documenting historical contributions, and strategies for supervising trauma cases in ethical ways consistent with the Task List and Ethical Compliance Code.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop,participants will be able to: (1)state some clinical differences between the repertoires of clients and caregivers in populations with and without evidence of adverse childhood experiences; (2)state examples operationalizing terms related to trauma and trauma history from a behavior analytic perspective; (3)state critical elements of ethical behavioral supervision supporting cases after traumatic backgrounds; (4) state critical features of documentation and assessment of risk for teams that support cases after significant adverse experiences; (5) name key features of an ethical functional behavior assessment for clients whose families are affected by adverse experiences; (6) state key features of a preventative schedules approach to behavior support after adverse experiences, in the context of evidence based interventions; (7) list ways the Professional and Ethical Compliance Code relates to appropriate assessment and treatment for clients affected by trauma; (8) use tools provided to identify and engineer example features of a preventative behavioral environment (and related behavior strategies) for case studies with abuse and neglect related history; (9) use tools provided to document and discuss risks for case studies with medical related aversive events.
Activities: Activities will include surveys, lecture, discussion, choral responding, small group discussion, role plays, and case studies. Objectives will be met through a mixed presentation of discussion, self-scoring, lecture and role play demonstrations of responding to case study scenarios. Supplemental materials will be provided so that participants will be able to review all surveys and tools after they leave the workshop.
Audience: This intermediate workshop is suggested for participants who are asked to, are considering, or are already accepting clients with a history others call trauma-related or whose care is discussed as trauma-informed. Participants' clients are not discussed in detail, but information will be provided to familiarize certified behavior analysts with minimizing and documenting risks, using appropriate techniques for completing ethical behavior assessment and supervision, and identifying evidence-based treatment for their own clients and teams. A model for ethical supervision and treatment after aversive histories will be discussed in the context of the current BACB task list and Ethical and Compliance Code. Participants will be encouraged to self-detect their own limitations and needs for further expanding their repertoires, to minimize risk to those affected by their practice when conducting behavior analysis with individuals after adverse experiences
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): aversive conditioning, ethics, trauma, trauma-informed
 
Workshop #W64
CE Offered: BACB — 
Ethics
If You Are a BCBA, Are You/Can You Become a Dog Trainer? Some Ethics and Some Steps in That Direction
Friday, May 25, 2018
12:00 PM–3:00 PM
Marriott Marquis, San Diego Ballroom A
Area: AAB/EAB; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Terri M. Bright, Ph.D.
TERRI M. BRIGHT (MSPCA Angell)
Description: When you have studied behavior analysis, you find yourself being asked about the behavior of non-human species, usually dogs. Do you pause before stepping into the breach and making suggestions? Until you have the tools to implement the assessments and interventions you have used with humans, you will likely not be able to generalize your skills to another species. Safety is also a reason: 4 million people are bitten by dogs each year. To a trained professional, the precursors of aggression are like a blinking neon sign; to a novice, they are unnoticed. Whether in your neighborhood, your home, or your workplace, dogs pose a bite risk to humans. This workshop will first remind BCBAs and others what the ethics are of teaching outside of their scope of training and experience. It will also teach attendees to identify precursors of canid aggression as well as what to do when they see them. Finally, if you are interested in dog training, this workshop will demonstrate generalization of such skills as preference assessments and functional assessment/analysis of dog behavior, and give some simple tools for training dogs, as well as instructions on how to refer to the right dog trainer.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) via videos and textual prompts, identify the precursors of dog aggression and how to stay safe in the presence of an aggressive dog; (2) identify how your behavioral skills are skewed towards humans and how your dog-training skills may be skewed away from science; (3) identify when and if you should intervene with a dog's problem behavior; (4) identify an ethical dog trainer in their geographical area should they need a referral; (5) learn to perform preference assessments and use the Functional Assessment of Dog Behavior (FADB), an assessment created by the workshop presenter.
Activities: Activities will include lecture, discussion, surveys, choral responding, small group breakout, still photos of dogs, dog behavior videos and textual prompts. Objectives will be met through a mixed presentation of discussion, self-scoring, lecture and video demonstrations of dog behavior. Supplemental materials will be provided such as participants will be able to review all photos, videos and surveys after they leave the workshop.
Audience: This basic workshop is meant for those who find themselves in the company of dogs and who are tempted to train them. Though participant's individual dogs' behaviors are not the target of the workshop, enough information will be disseminated so that participants can, perhaps, begin their dog-training at home, using the tenets of ABA and within the scope of the BACB Task List; they will be able to recognize the limits of their behavioral skills across species. Those who come into contact with dogs in the community or workplace and who are fearful or uncertain will be better equipped to act appropriately, be it to gain safety or to find referrals.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W66
CE Offered: BACB — 
Ethics
How to Talk to Teachers to Increase Procedural Fidelity in Classrooms
Friday, May 25, 2018
12:00 PM–3:00 PM
Marriott Marquis, San Diego Ballroom C
Area: EDC/PRA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Wendela Whitcomb Marsh, M.A.
WENDELA WHITCOMB MARSH (PIPS: Positive Intervention Problem Solving)
Description: Behavior analysts are ethically required to communicate using language that is fully understandable to the recipient. 1.05 (b) Working in the school system presents unique challenges. Educators are professionals, and talking down to them risks alienation. On the other hand, teaches are not usually well-versed in behavioral terminology. They may believe they understand concepts such as extinction, without fully grasping them. They may misunderstand key differences, such as reinforcement vs. bribery. Finally, if they are not completely on board with our plan, they may not follow the procedures with fidelity, either discontinuing the plan prematurely, or unintentionally (or intentionally) sabotaging it. This workshop discusses ways to communicate with teachers so that they will hear us, understand us, and follow through with integrity.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to:(1) avoid communication pitfalls by understanding why, how, and when to talk with teachers; (2) explain basic behavioral concepts (e.g., bribery vs. reinforcement) in easily understandable terms; (3)increase teacher engagement to improve procedural integrity.
Activities: Instructional strategies include: lecture, examples, role modeling, paired practice, and group games
Audience: This is a basic workshop appropriate for any BCBA or BCABA working in school settings, or who may work with teachers in the future.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
Keyword(s): classroom teachers, procedural fidelity, school-based, team communication
 
Workshop #W67
CE Offered: PSY/BACB — 
Ethics
Solving Ethical Dilemmas in the Practice of Applied Behavior Analysis
Friday, May 25, 2018
12:00 PM–3:00 PM
Manchester Grand Hyatt, Balboa A-C
Area: PRA/PCH; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Weihe Huang, Ph.D.
WEIHE HUANG (Creating Behavioral + Educational Momentum), KARRE WILLIAMS (Creating Behavioral + Educational Momentum )
Description: This workshop is designed to increase participants' ability to ethically practice applied behavior analysis (ABA) by describing the characteristics of ethical dilemmas, discussing Guidelines for Responsible Conduct, and introducing an ethical decision making model. This approach incorporates codes of ethics for behavior analysts and ethical reasoning strategies. When making ethical decisions, many behavior analysts tend to believe that these decisions are solely based on the analysis of objective data and relevant evidences. However, in reality the decision-making process is also influenced by behavior analysts' values, as well as societal values including those of services recipients. Behavior analysts often encounter ethical dilemmas when these values conflict. In facing ethical dilemmas, behavior analysts need codes of professional conduct and ethically sound strategies to reach reasonable and practical resolutions. The Guidelines for Responsible Conduct for Behavior Analysts is helpful in many situations. In some cases, however, ethical dilemmas cannot be resolved by appealing to the existing guidelines or regulations. Part of this workshop is aimed at providing applied behavior analysts with ethical reasoning strategies in the event that the Guidelines for Responsible Conduct alone are insufficient. These strategies are based on the relevant experience of the presenters and the available literature in the field of behavior analysis and related areas. The emphasis of the discussion will be on the application of Guidelines for Responsible Conduct for Behavior Analysts and the Ethical Decision Making Model to various clinical settings, including natural homes, residential facilities, day programs, and educational programs.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) list and describe at least five core ethical principles in the field of applied behavior analysis; (2) select and define a core ethical principle from a group of 4 mixed rues/principles; (3) identify and describe some most common ethical dilemmas faced by behavior analysts; (4) discriminate among ethical dilemmas, clinical problems, and administrative issues by selecting the correct one from a group of four different challenging situations; (5) demonstrate a working knowledge in the Guidelines for Responsible Conduct for Behavior Analysts by being able to identify appropriate guideline(s) that could address a particular ethical issue; (6) identify, define, and explain problem-solving strategies in a variety of ethical situations; (7) perform the Six-Step Ethical Decision Making Model and generalize the learned skill in different scenarios by completing the required steps described in the ethical decision making model for different ethical dilemmas.
Activities: This workshop will use cases both provided by the presenters and generated by participants to illustrate the implementation of Guidelines for Responsible Conduct for Behavior Analysts and the steps in the Ethical Decision Making Model. Participants of this workshop will be encouraged to (1) identify their values and to associate these values with primary ethical principles; (2) recognize the characteristics of ethical dilemmas in the field of ABA; and (3) apply codes in Guidelines for Responsible Conduct and six steps specified in the Ethical Decision Making Model to cases that involve ethical dilemmas.
Audience: Board certified behavior analysts at all levels are the primary audience of this workshop. In addition, licensed psychologists, licensed therapists, and social workers could benefit from the content of this educational event as well.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Ethical Dilemmas
 
Workshop #W68
CE Offered: BACB — 
Ethics
Evidence-Based Practice: A Decision-Making Model for Ethically Selecting Interventions for Your Client
Friday, May 25, 2018
12:00 PM–3:00 PM
Manchester Grand Hyatt, Gaslamp AB
Area: PRA/DDA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Susan Wilczynski, Ph.D.
SUSAN WILCZYNSKI (Ball State University), TIMOTHY A. SLOCUM (Utah State University), RONNIE DETRICH (The Wing Institute)
Description: Evidence-based practice (EBP) is a decision-making model that practitioners can use to make sound ethical decisions for their clients (Slocum et al., 2014; Wilczynski, 2017). EBP involves using professional judgment to integrate the best available evidence with client factors and contextual variables. By using the EBP model, practitioners are well-positioned to select, reject, adapt, or retain a treatment while considering their ethical responsibilities to provide effective treatment, to work in collaboration or consultation with other professionals, to communicate effectively with clients (and their families) and involve clients and in planning, and to individualize behavior-change programs. This workshop will introduce an EBP checklist to attendees to help them integrate each of these components of the ethics code. Participants will actively work through examples in which they select the best intervention option given the complex and sometimes conflicting expectations in our field (e.g., most effective interventions versus social validity). Participants will be coached on how to apply the EBP model to make ethical decisions (BACB, 2014) regarding treatment choices for their own clients. Behavior analysts who seek to better understand how to apply the ethics code under real world conditions will find the EBP Checklist a useful tool to guide their decision-making.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to (1)identify the relationship between the evidence-based practice decision-making model and the ethics code; (2) use the evidence-based practice checklist to guide their decisions to select, reject, adapt, or retain a treatment; (3) apply the EBP decision-making model to make ethical decisions regarding their clients.
Activities: This workshop is designed to help evidence-based practitioners of ABA to learn how to apply the EBP checklist to make sound and ethical decisions when initially selecting treatments as well as using data to determine if a given intervention should be rejected, adapted or retained. The training methods applied in this workshop is didactic instruction and discussion. Examples of how to apply the EBP decision-making model to clients with a range of identified disabilities (e.g., autism spectrum disorder, traumatic brain injury, etc.) as well as non-examples that provide clarification between accurate and inaccurate use of the EBP checklist will be provided. These examples and non-examples will be based on the clinical decision-making of the workshop presenters drawn from decades of experience. Finally, participants will be coached regarding how to apply the EBP checklist to their current cases. At the conclusion of the workshop, participants should be able to incorporate multiple competing components into their decision-making in order to ethically select, reject, adapt, or retain interventions.
Audience: Intermediate: Our goal is to teach practicing behavior analysts or professors teaching practitioners how to effectively and ethically integrate the various demands for science-based and socially valid described in our field.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): ethics, evidence-based practice, social validity
 
Workshop #W81
CE Offered: BACB — 
Ethics
Ethical Implications of Addressing Stereotypical Behavior in Children With Autism: What Practitioners Need to Know
Friday, May 25, 2018
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Manchester Grand Hyatt, Harbor Ballroom C
Area: AUT/PRA; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Kathleen McCabe-Odri, Ed.D.
KATHLEEN MCCABE-ODRI (Partners In Learning, Inc.), NICOLE M. RZEMYK (Partners in Learning, Inc.), LORI LORENZETTI (Partners in Learning, Inc,), ADRIENNE RIZZO (Partners in Learning), MELANIE ERWINSKI (Partners inLearning, Inc.), SAMARIA JUANANDRES (Partners in Learning, Inc.)
Description: According to the American Psychiatric Association, "restricted, repetitive, and stereotyped patterns of behavior are one of three core diagnostic features of autistic disorders and are a frequent target of behavioral interventions for children with autism." (Cunningham & Schreibman, 2008). Current functional analysis methodology provides the general label "automatic reinforcement" for behaviors that persist in the absence of social consequences. (Lanovaz, Rapp & Fletcher, 2010). Various peer-reviewed research has addressed the clinical concerns of repetitive behaviors, as "stereotypy can occur at high rates in children with and without developmental delays (and) these behaviors can interfere with the acquisition of new skills and social interactions" (Korneder, 2014), as well as cause injury in exacerbated rates (Cervantes et.al, 2014). The literature provides an array of antecedent and consequence interventions, often in multi-component presentations with frequent use of punishment protocols, (Boyd, 2013) with varied degrees of socially significant change. This workshop addresses evidence-based treatment options for stereotypical behaviors via literature review and case study analysis. Participants will discuss the ethical implications of various treatment options, including suggested guidelines to assist practitioners on how and when to intervene in these class of behaviors that "often persist in the absence of social consequences" (Lovaas, Newsom & Hickman, 1987).
Learning Objectives: At the end of this presentation, attendees will be able to: (1) analyze the historical review of literature re stereotypical behavior and interventions; (2) analyze varied treatment components to address stereotypes via case studies; (3)assess the possible functions of varied types of stereotypies; (4) discuss and describe potential ethical considerations via the BACB code the pros and cons of addressing stereotypical behaviors, as well as current best practice recommendations.
Activities: Workshop objectives will be met via a balanced presentation of lecture, video observation, and group discussion. Core content will be taught through case study presentations. Supplemental materials for identifying the function of repetitive behaviors and levels for intervention will be provided.
Audience: BCBAs, child study team members, behavior specialists/consultants
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W94
CE Offered: PSY/BACB — 
Ethics
Behavior Analytic Leadership: How to Use Behavioral Science to Leader Ethically in Our Field
Friday, May 25, 2018
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Manchester Grand Hyatt, Coronado Ballroom DE
Area: OBM/PRA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Natalie A. Parks, Ph.D.
ADAM E. VENTURA (World Evolve, Inc.), ASHLEY TUDOR (Behavior Leader), NATALIE A. PARKS (Pulse Business Strategies LLC)
Description: When considering leadership behavior in our field, several questions emerge, namely, What is leadership in behavior analysis? Why is it important, Who can lead others, and most importantly how do you shape the behavior of a behavior analysis leader? More specifically, how do you shape ethical leadership behavior? Identifying all of the elements that yield the ideal behavior analysis leadership mixture can be challenging. Leaders in our field are made up of a variety of different behavioral particles that if heated to the appropriate temperature can create a catalyst that brings out the best OR worst in their followers. But what is the appropriate formula for developing leaders and how can current leaders help energize their followers towards accomplishing the mission in an ethical manner? This workshop will provide answers to those questions and provide details on the specific leadership behaviors that will help grow your organization, achieve a high level of prominence within our field, and help to establish a long lasting (and positive) legacy for everyone at your organization.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) identify and define the definition of leadership in behavior analysis; (2) identify leadership behavioral cusps; (3) determine individual behaviors that will maximize leadership skills; (4) identify and execute steps for leading others in behavior analysis.
Activities: Instructional Strategies Include: lecture, discussion, small group discussion Workshop objectives will be met through a balanced presentation of lecture, discussion, modeling, and role plays.
Audience: Target audience include BCBAs or business administrators who are in or will transition into a leadership position and want to learn how to lead in behavior analysis and using behavior analytic principles. Participants must have an understanding of behavior analytic terms.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): ethical leadership, leadership, leading others
 
Workshop #W102
CE Offered: BACB — 
Ethics
CANCELED: Working Through an Ethical Dilemma Step-by-Step Using the Professional and Ethical Compliance Code
Friday, May 25, 2018
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Room to be Announced
Area: PRA/DDA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Amanda L. Little, Ph.D.
AMANDA L. LITTLE (The University of Texas at Austin, The Meadows Center), NANETTE L. PERRIN (LifeShare USA )
Description: The Professional and Ethical Compliance Code (BACB, 2014) is the go-to document for behavior analysts when studying ethical behavior. This code gives valuable guidance to behavior analytic practitioners in everyday practice. This workshop will discuss the 10 guidelines/codes that comprise the new Professional and Ethical Compliance Code (BACB, 2014). Participants will engage in a pre-quiz to assess their baseline knowledge on each of the 10 guidelines/codes. The instructors will then review each guideline and foster conversation around appropriate actions that could be taken if those ethical dilemmas occur. Bailey and Burch (2016) provide seven steps to making a conclusion when an ethical dilemma has occurred. An example ethical dilemma will be given to participants, and the group will use those seven steps to come to a conclusion. A post-quiz will also help review the workshop information.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop participants will be able to: (1) State the 10 guidelines/codes of the Professional and Ethical Compliance Code (BACB, 2014); (2) Accurately identify Bailey and Burch (2016) seven steps to work through an ethical dilemma; (3) Accurately identify which guideline addresses the example dilemma; (4) State a conclusion for the example dilemma using Bailey and Burch (2016) seven steps; (5) Increase percentage of correct quiz questions related to ethics in behavior analysis.
Activities: Take pre/post quizzes regarding ethical behavior of behavior analysts Lecture on the 10 Guidelines/Codes in the Professional and Ethical Compliance Code for Behavior Analysts (BACB, 2014) Lecture on Bailey and Burch (2016) viewpoints on ethical guidelines of behavior analysts Exercise on using Bailey and Burch (2016) seven steps to make a conclusion for an example ethical dilemma
Audience: Board Certified Behavior Analysts-Doctorate, Board Certified Behavior Analysts, Board Certified Associate Behavior Analysts, and Registered Behavior Technicians, or those training to be any of these who are seeking additional practice identifying and appropriately responding to ethical dilemmas they may face in their professional interactions with individuals/families, supervisors/supervisees, and other service providers.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): ethical behavior, ethics, home/community
 
 
Workshop #W103
CE Offered: BACB — 
Ethics
Ethical Issues in Billing for ABA Services
Friday, May 25, 2018
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Manchester Grand Hyatt, Seaport Ballroom C
Area: PRA/AUT; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Melissa L. Olive, Ph.D.
MELISSA L. OLIVE (Applied Behavioral Strategies LLC)
Description: This workshop will focus on ethical issues specifically related to billing for ABA services. Participants will learn about confidentiality requirements related to billing, federal laws related to billing, coding rules and procedures, internal policies to prevent billing fraud, and available software to assist agencies in billing ethically. Information will be provided in lecture format with case studies as examples. The legal and ethical responsibilities of a behavior analyst will be discussed. Time will be allotted for extensive question and answer. Detailed handouts will be provided.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) describe how the current BACB Professional and Ethical Compliance Code applies to providing and billing for ABA services; (2) describe key components of HIPAA and HITECH and how they relate to providing and billing for ABA services; (3) describe relevant policies from the Centers for Medicaid and Medicare; (4) describe the relevant CPT coding rules that apply; (5) describe the appropriate use of new and old CPT codes; (6) compare and contrast documents from ABAI and from AMA related to billing for services; (7) identify strategies for prevention of billing fraud.
Activities: Lecture, Discussion, Case Study, Question and Answer
Audience: Practicing Behavior Analysts, business owners, supervisors of practicing behavior analysts
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Billing, Business, Ethics, Insurance
 
Workshop #W105
CE Offered: BACB/QABA — 
Ethics
CANCELED: Gender-Affirming Clinical Skills for Behavior Analysts: Looking Through the Lens of BACB Ethics
Friday, May 25, 2018
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Room to be Announced
Area: PRA/CSS; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Worner Leland, M.S.
WORNER LELAND (Upswing Advocates), JANANI VAIDYA (The Chicago School of Professional Psychology)
Description: Transgender and gender nonconforming identities have gained increasing visibility within recent years, and gender plays a significant role in how social interactions are constructed for people of all gender identities. This workshop provides an overview of key concepts and social practices related to gender, as well as ways that the BACB's Professional and Ethical Compliance Code addresses gender. The instructor will facilitate a nonjudgmental space for participants to ask questions, explore new content, and brainstorm ways to build gender-affirming practices in their professional work. Participants will learn specific strategies of how Behavior Analysts can promote gender-affirming interactions with their clients, staff, and others. Empirically supported literature and data will be presented where applicable and available, and audience questions and discussion will be welcomed throughout the workshop.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will be able to: (1) state which guidelines in the Professional and Ethical Compliance Code for Behavior Analysts (BACB, 2014) are applicable to gender;(2) select key differences between gender identity, biological sex, gender roles, gender expression/presentation, and sexual orientation; (3) describe ways that the gender binary may restrict responding for all individuals, not only transgender people;(4) state several concrete strategies to apply to the professional workplace that create a gender affirming environment for clients and staff.
Activities: Activities will include: Pre/post quizzes, lecture, small group discussion, FreeWrite exercises, worksheets, video examples, and online learning activities.
Audience: Audience: BCBA-D, BCBA, BCaBA, RBTs, or those training to be any of these who are interested in building their competence around the topic of gender. Teachers, therapists, and other helping professionals are also welcome to attend.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
Keyword(s): diversity, ethics, gender, sexuality
 
 
Panel #60
CE Offered: BACB — 
Ethics
Ethical and Sustainable: The SkillCorps Training Model
Saturday, May 26, 2018
12:00 PM–12:50 PM
Marriott Marquis, Marina Ballroom G
Area: CSS/TBA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Crystal S. Thompson, M.S.
Chair: Kathryn Petersen (Global Autism Project)
NICOLE SKOTZ (Malama Pono Autism Center, Global Autism Project)
KELLY DEACON (ABC Group Hawaii: Autism Behavior Consulting Group, Global Autism Project)
KSENIA KRAVTCHENKO (Global Autism Project and Endicott College)
Abstract: For the past 5 years the Global Autism Project has been providing training to autism centers around the world through our SkillCorps program. This unique volunteer program allows professionals to bring their experience to centers in underserved areas around the world. Our panel of SkillCorps participants will discuss the benefits and challenges of short-term volunteering to both volunteers and service partners as well as how the Global Autism Project has dealt with these challenges.
Target Audience: BCBAs consultants
Learning Objectives: describe the risks of short-term volunteer programs describe the challenges of international training from the perspective of short-term volunteers describe the conditions necessary for the success of international training
Keyword(s): internatonal development, sustainability, training, volunteer
 
 
Symposium #96
CE Offered: BACB — 
Ethics
Guidance or Compliance: What Makes an Ethical Behavior Analyst?
Saturday, May 26, 2018
3:00 PM–3:50 PM
Marriott Marquis, Marina Ballroom F
Area: PCH/PRA
CE Instructor: Nancy Rosenberg, Ph.D.
Chair: Nancy Rosenberg (University of Washington)
Discussant: Matthew T. Brodhead (Michigan State University)
Abstract: In 2016, the Behavior Analyst Certification Board released a new revised ethical code for the field: The Professional and Ethical Compliance Code for Behavior Analysts. In this revised code, the board has shifted the language of the code from that of a set of guidelines to that of a set of enforceable rules. This important shift has not been well discussed in the field. In this symposium, we explore the potential implications and perhaps inadvertent consequences of such a shift and propose that a focus on a process of ethical decision making, rather than on an increasing set of rules, may be a better way to promote ethical behavior within the field. We propose a possible ethical decision making process and give a case example of how the process would be used in confronting an ethical dilemma.
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): compliance code, ethics
Target Audience: Practicing BCBAs
Learning Objectives: 1) Learners will understand the ethical approach taken by the current ethical code and the implications of that approach 2) Learners will understand other approaches to ethical decision making 3) Learners will be learn of a possible ethical decision making process and how to use it.
 
Ethical Decision Making
(Theory)
NANCY ROSENBERG (University of Washington), Ilene S. Schwartz (University of Washington)
Abstract: Abstract: This presentation will discuss the rule-based ethical approach currently being taken by the BACB and the potential implications of that approach. It will provide an overview of other historical approaches to ethical decision making and their strengths and weaknesses and will propose that a focus on an ethical decision making process rather than a focus on compliance with a set of rules might better promote ethical decision making within the field of behavior analysis.
 
An Ethical Decision Making Process for Behavior Analysts
(Theory)
ILENE S. SCHWARTZ (University of Washington), Nancy Rosenberg (University of Washington)
Abstract: Abstract: This talk will outline a possible ethical decision making process developed to help behavior analysts carefully and methodically analyze ethical dilemmas encountered in their practice. The talk will outline the steps of the process and then present a case study example of how the process would be used to help resolve an ethical dilemma.
 
 
Symposium #109
CE Offered: BACB — 
Ethics
The Big Picture: An Analysis of Interlocking and Competing Contingencies Affecting Values-Based Practice
Saturday, May 26, 2018
3:00 PM–4:50 PM
Manchester Grand Hyatt, Seaport Ballroom C
Area: PRA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Jennifer Klapatch Totsch, Ph.D.
Chair: Amy Nicole Lawless (The Chicago School of Professional Psychology)
Discussant: Janani Vaidya (The Chicago School of Professional Psychology)
Abstract: In general, the practice of ABA is guided by a complicated array of variables, such alignment with the seven dimensions of ABA (Baer, Wolf, & Risley, 1986), adherence to our Professional and Ethical Compliance Code (Behavior Analyst Certification Board, 2017), and setting-specific policies and requirements (such as those dictated by agency administrations, funding streams, licensure laws, etc.), just to name a few. Additionally, each practitioner also has specific values that guide their practice. Sometimes, these values may conflict with our ability to practice in such a way that is supported by our environment. In this symposium, the authors will discuss several practice scenarios, highlighting the interlocking and competing contingencies that may put clinician values in conflict with ethical guidelines and practice standards. The symposium will conclude with a discussion of the ?big picture,? and how clinicians can clarify their values in service of practicing in a way that best serves our clients, their community, and our field.
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): ethics, interlocking contingencies, practice-based issues, values
Target Audience: BCBAs
Learning Objectives: 1. By the end of this presentation, attendees will be able to identify personal values that guide their practice of ABA. 2. By the end of this presentation, attendees will be able to analyze those values to determine if they align or contradict with ethical and practice guidelines. 3. By the end of this presentation, attendees will be able to identify ways they can practice in service of their values while still abiding by ethical and practice guidelines.
 
Putting the "Functional" in Skill Building for Restorative Justice Practices
WORNER LELAND (Upswing Advocates), Fawna Stockwell (Upswing Advocates)
Abstract: In interpersonal situations involving serious harm, cultural contingencies often involve solely punitive measures. Punitive measures, including calling law enforcement and utilizing prison systems, often completely discount habilitation and training functional replacement behaviors. These systems typically do not take behavior function into account. Restorative Justice practices can be a meaningful alternative to punitive systems. Restorative Justice “encourages those who have caused harm to acknowledge the impact of what they have done and gives them an opportunity to make reparation. It offers those who have suffered harm the opportunity to have their harm or loss acknowledged and amends made,” (Restorative Justice Consortium 2006). This is achieved through focusing on Victim Healing and Support, Offenders Accepting Responsibility, Dialogue for Perspective Taking, Amends or Reparations, Skill Building to Prevent Future Harm, and Community Reintegration. For skill building to prevent future harm, however, it is important to assess behavior function and to train functional replacement behaviors. This presentation will discuss the potential impact of behavior analytic involvement in Transformative Justice practices, and ethical implications at the cultural and systemic level.
 
The Application of Transformative Justice-Based Practices in Improving the Social Validity of Behavior Change Interventions
JENNIFER KLAPATCH TOTSCH (National Louis University)
Abstract: Transformative justice-based practices often focus on examining the impact of an individual's harmful or problematic behaviors on others in their environment. Specifically, the goal of transformative justice-based practices is not only to decrease future instances of that harmful behavior, but also to focus on the healing of persons harmed by those behaviors (i.e., the victims). Behavior analysts are often tasked with working with individuals who emit problematic behaviors that negatively impact others in that client's environment (such as a client aggressing toward their parent). During this presentation, we will discuss the interlocking nature of both our client's harmful behaviors and the behavior of those harmed by the clients (i.e., the victims). We'll then discuss how to design interventions that both effectively and ethically target those problematic behaviors while concurrently focusing on validating the victim's experience and healing the relationships that may have been damaged as a result of the client's problematic behavior.
 
Considering Client Values in Clinical Decision Making
JAMINE DETTMERING (ReachABA)
Abstract: Making decisions that impact service recipients can be challenging, especially in cases which measures to ensure the clients health and safety conflict with the client’s values. Parents and guardians often consult with Board Certified Behavior Analysts (BCBA’s) when making decisions on behalf of clients receiving services. In situations concerning the health and safety of the client, recommended interventions may include restrictions that reduce the risk of harm to the client, but may neglect the values of the client. Individuals with intellectual disabilities may be assumed to be incompetent to make rational decisions and therefore are not included in the planning of and consent for behavior-change programs, despite our ethical obligation to involve clients (Behavior Analysis Certification Board, 2014). This presentation will (a) evaluate practitioner’s role in decision-making and impact on the service recipient, (b) discuss tactics that promote values-based decision making in consideration of the values of the parent or guardian and the service recipient, and (c) examine strategies to ensure values-based decision making in practice.
 
Organizational Maintenance of Ethical Practice Repertoires
AMY NICOLE LAWLESS (The Chicago School of Professional Psychology)
Abstract: Board Certified Behavior Analysts (BCBA’s) are ethically obligated to rely on scientific knowledge when engaging in professional endeavors and to maintain competence through access with the current research relevant to their clients and attending professional development events, such as conferences and workshops (Behavior Analyst Certification Board, 2014). Although organizations arrange contingencies to ensure sufficient monthly billable hours and completion of paperwork, many organizations neglect to implement organizational systems that maintain behaviors related to research and professional development. BCBA’s are tasked with maintaining programs for their caseload, training therapists, and working with families of service recipients, in addition to maintaining responsibilities in their personal lives. In the absence of organizational systems that support ongoing professional development, it is less likely BCBA’s are engaging in these behaviors. This presentation will discuss (a) ethical guidelines related to ongoing professional development, (b) contingencies impacting BCBA’s behaviors related to professional development, and (c) organizational systems that may enhance professional development.
 
 
Panel #185
CE Offered: BACB — 
Ethics
Thinking Outside of the Skinner Box: Ethically Addressing Barriers to Learning Using the Evidence-Based Practice Model
Sunday, May 27, 2018
8:00 AM–8:50 AM
Manchester Grand Hyatt, Seaport Ballroom DE
Area: PRA/DDA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Megan Miller, Ph.D.
Chair: Megan Miller (FSU CARD; Navigation Behavioral Consulting)
ROBERT SCHRAMM (Knospe-ABA)
STEVEN J. WARD (Whole Child Consulting, LLC)
MARY LYNCH BARBERA (Barbera Behavior Consulting, LLC)
Abstract: Behavior analysts are frequently trained to implement specific procedures found within behavioral and educational journals. However, practitioners frequently encounter situations that do not exactly apply to this literature base. This panel will discuss how to ethically apply the science of behavior analysis using an evidence-based practice model focused on clinical expertise, the individual client, and the best available research. Panelists will discuss how they have successfully applied this model to address common barriers to learning such as weak motivation, escape maintained challenging behavior, prompt dependence, and developing instructional control. Each panelist has significant experience and expertise with applying the science of behavior analysis as a whole and determining the most effective intervention for each client based on the methods and principles of this science as opposed to broadly and generically applying popular procedures with each client. Audience members will be given the opportunity at the end of the panel to ask the panelists for their expertise in ethically addressing common barriers to learning.
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience: This panel is most appropriate for intermediate level or higher behavior analysts who have been practicing for several years and wish to learn more about how to enhance the scientific application of behavior analysis within the practitioner setting.
Learning Objectives: Participants will be able to identify how at least one section of the Code applies to the use of the evidence-based practice model Participants will be able to explain how to modify popular behavior analytic procedures based on the needs of their individual clients Participants will be able to explain how to individually assess barriers for each learner and develop interventions based on this assessment.
Keyword(s): EBP, Escape Extinction, Prompt Dependence
 
 
Panel #203
CE Offered: BACB — 
Ethics
Working With Caregivers: Challenges and Triumphs
Sunday, May 27, 2018
9:00 AM–9:50 AM
Manchester Grand Hyatt, Coronado Ballroom AB
Area: CBM/AUT; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Laurie Tarter, Psy.D.
Chair: Laurie Tarter (Encompass Behavioral Health/Sunny Days of California)
JANET VASQUEZ (World Evolve Therapy)
KIMBERLY D WOOLERY (World Evolve Inc.; Sunny Days, Inc.)
KARELIX ALICEA (Lotus Behavioral Interventions)
Abstract: Chair: Laurie Tarter, Psy.D., BCBA Presenters: Karelix Alicea, M.S., BCBA, Janet Vasquez, M.S., BCBA, Kimberly Woolery, M.S., BCBA Behavior analytic service delivery not only involves the participation of the client, but their parents and caregivers as well. There are several factors that impact the outcome of Applied Behavior Analysis services for clients. Some factors include various parenting styles, the level of buy-in, and the caregivers' willingness and availability to participate in Applied Behavior Analysis sessions. The panel will discuss the paramount role of parents and other caregivers within the Applied Behavior Analysis service delivery system from several different perspectives, including business policies, ethical considerations, method of service delivery (i.e., in-vivo vs. telehealth) and also incorporating the family systems perspective. Each panel member will address and present on a particular area of expertise, all while sharing personal stories and insights on their challenges and triumphs in working with caregivers in the field of Applied Behavior Analysis.
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience: The target audience are those who supervise ABA programs for clients with caretakers or parents. It will also target those who might run an ABA agency from a business standpoint.
Learning Objectives: N/A
Keyword(s): ABA services, Caregiver, Parents
 
 
Invited Paper Session #235
CE Offered: PSY/BACB/QABA/NASP — 
Ethics
Research Synthesis of Behavioral Interventions for People With Autism: Strategies to Maximize Social Impact
Sunday, May 27, 2018
11:00 AM–11:50 AM
Manchester Grand Hyatt, Seaport Ballroom DE
Area: AUT
Instruction Level: Intermediate
CE Instructor: Javier Virues Ortega, Ph.D.
Chair: Nicole Heal (Margaret Murphy Center for Children)
JAVIER VIRUES ORTEGA (The University of Auckland)
Javier Virues-Ortega is a senior lecturer and director of the Applied Behaviour Analysis programme at The University of Auckland (New Zealand). After five years in a leading public health research institution he developed an interest in translating mainstream outcome research methods into applied behavior analysis. He is author of over a hundred specialized publications. His work has been cited thousands of times and summarized in the medical policies of a number of major health insurance providers in the US. For example, UnitedHealthcare group cited and summarized two of Virues-Ortega's meta-analyses in their policy on behavioural services for autism spectrum disorder.
Abstract: Scientists cite clinical trials hundreds of times while decision makers use clinical trials and meta-analyses as the foundation for policies affecting millions. By contrast, JABA papers live a silent and unassuming life. Historically, applied behavior analysis has disregarded the potential for an "applied behavioral synthesis." The vast majority of our empirical literature is composed of experimental analyses of molecular processes often evaluating the impact of discrete reinforcement-based procedures on few behaviors of interest over a limited period of time. We lack a conceptual framework to translate experimentally sound baby steps into service and treatment models that have to be comprehensive and longitudinal in nature. This talk will explore strategies for synthesizing behavior-analytic evidence that would be compatible with both the single-subject experimental tradition of applied behavior analysis, and the outcome research standards of mainstream clinical sciences. The end goal of this approach is to develop efficient channels to translate applied behavior analysis into service models that policy and health decision-makers could find acceptable.
Target Audience: Board certified behavior analysts, licensed psychologists, graduate students.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) Understand the relative social impact of various forms of evaluating evidence; (2) Understand the key differences in evidence evaluation between behavior analysis and mainstream clinical sciences; (3) Understand the empirical basis (or lack of thereof) of key methodological standards of randomized control trials; (4) Understand the potential for behavior-analytic research to follow them.
 
 
Symposium #238
CE Offered: BACB — 
Ethics
Ethical Considerations and the Application of Restraint
Sunday, May 27, 2018
11:00 AM–11:50 AM
Manchester Grand Hyatt, Grand Hall D
Area: AUT/DDA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Britany Melton, M.A.
Chair: Britany Melton (Endicott College)
Discussant: Samantha Russo (Endicott College)
Abstract: Ethics are paramount in human services, especially behavior analysis (Goldiamond, 2002). The Behavior Analysis Certification Board (BACB) has developed a code of ethics to determine ethical behavior in practitioners (Board, B. A. C. (2014). The development of this skill set, in practitioners, is of the utmost importance to continue to move the field forward. Located within the code of ethics is section 5, titled Behavior Analysts as Supervisors (Board, B. A. C., (2014). The BACB has recently released new supervision guidelines that outline a more stringent process to allow supervision to occur based on data collected and analyzed. Within applied behavior analysis, psychology and other human services the use of behavior skills training (BST), fluency, and other proven teaching methodology much be used to establish competency of skills is well established (St. Lawrence, J. S., Jefferson, K. W., Alleyne, E., & Brasfield, T. L. (1995). This however has not been readily applied to ethical behavior decision-making (Trevino & Youngblood, 1990). This paper will discuss how BST and other proven teaching methods can be applied to teach competency to decision making when ethical issues arise in clinical practice utilizing restraint.
Instruction Level: Basic
Keyword(s): Clinical Application, Ethics, Restraint
Target Audience: Practitioners and Clinicians
 
The Use of Contingent Restraint in a Clinical Setting
JESSICA ZAWACKI (PAAL), Thomas L. Zane (University of Kansas), Gloria Satriale (PAAL)
Abstract: PBS was developed in the 1990s as a way to address challenging behavior and enhance the quality of life of individuals with varying disabilities. While the use of reinforcement is essential and one of the most powerful tools in the Applied Behavior Analysis tool box, when all reinforcement and other positive strategies have been explored and are not success in addressing dangerous, challenging behaviors other methods of intervention must be considered. Contingent restraint is an intervention that has been used to successfully decrease or eliminate self-injurious or aggressive behaviors with individuals with developmental disabilities. ABAI hold specific standards addressing the use of contingent restraint and all guidelines were adhered to during the implementation of a restraint protocol with an adolescent diagnosed with autism who engaged in severe self-injury and aggression. Functional assessment indicated both behaviors were maintained by escape. Aggression had an additional reinforcing component of making aggressive contact with staff and self-injury had an additional automatic component. The protocol was carefully monitored and over 180 days' results yielded significant decreases in both target behaviors with an increase in compliance and mastery of critical life skills contributing to an overall better quality of life for the participant and his family.
 
Reducing Restraint Duration With an Adult Population
JESSICA BURNS (Eden Autism), Samantha Russo (Eden Autism; Endicott College), Christopher Tallmadge (Eden Autism)
Abstract: Restraint has been a controversial component of treatment plans and emergency safety plans in the field of Applied Behavior Analysis (Bailey et al., 2010). At times restraint may be necessary to maintain safety for clients and for staff members. The literature supports that injury rates are lower for both staff and clients when restraint is used as a component of a behavior support plan rather than as an emergency procedure (Williams, 2010). When restraint is included in behavior support plans it is a primary ethical concern for clinicians to fade restraint in the safest manner possible. The purpose of the current study was to replicate and extend on the methods used in Luiselli, Pace & Dunn (2006).
 
 
Panel #294
CE Offered: BACB — 
Ethics
Rapid Prompting Method: Facilitated Communication in Sheep's Clothing and a Threat to the Delivery of Effective Interventions
Sunday, May 27, 2018
3:00 PM–3:50 PM
Manchester Grand Hyatt, Seaport Ballroom A
Area: PRA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Paul A. Dores, Ph.D.
Chair: Matthew C. Howarth (Verbal Behavior Associates)
PAUL A. DORES (Psychologist in Private Practice; Verbal Behavior Associates)
GINA GREEN (Association of Professional Behavior Analysts)
PAMELA TOWNSEND (Dannis Woliver Kelley)
Abstract: Soma Rapid Prompting Method (RPM) is a methodology that purports to build communication and academic skills in learners with autism and other diagnoses using intensive verbal, auditory, visual, and tactile prompts. Use of RPM is often accompanied by extraordinary claims that learners exhibited exceptional skill levels, and even genius-like talents, even though most had shown no signs of such skills before RPM was used and no scientific research supports those claims. This panel discussion will address the similarities between Rapid Prompting Method and Facilitated Communication (FC) and threats that both represent to the effective implementation of applied behavior analysis interventions (for example, when false communications produced via RPM or FC replace actual, independent communication, or those methods supplant proven intervention methods). Objective procedures for testing the authorship of messages produced via RPM or FC and the ethical and legal challenges they pose for ABA practitioners and school districts will also be discussed.
Target Audience: All ABA practitioners and educational professionals: BCBAs, BCaBA, School Psychologists
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the panel discussion, participants will be able to: 1) Identify the barriers to applying effective interventions when encountering non-evidence based practices. 2) List the ethical issues surrounding Rapid Prompting Method 3) Describe the Iaws and regulations around the usage of RPM in schools
 
 
Panel #355
CE Offered: BACB — 
Ethics
Strictly Business: How the BACB Professional and Ethical Code of Conduct Makes for Good Business Policies and Decision-Making
Sunday, May 27, 2018
6:00 PM–6:50 PM
Manchester Grand Hyatt, Seaport Ballroom A
Area: PRA/AUT; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Melissa L. Olive, Ph.D.
Chair: Melissa L. Olive (Applied Behavioral Strategies LLC)
MEGAN MILLER (FSU CARD; Navigation Behavioral Consulting)
WILLIAM TIM COURTNEY (Little Star Center)
MELISSA L. OLIVE (Applied Behavioral Strategies LLC)
Abstract: This panel will focus on how businesses of various sizes have created policies and decision-making processes for preventing ethical dilemmas throughout various aspects of the business of providing ABA services. Even with the best antecedent and reinforcement-based interventions in place, misconduct may still occur. Thus, agencies should create, implement, and evaluate procedures to address misconduct within agencies.
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience: Practicing Behavior Analysts, Business owners, Supervisors of BCBAs, BCaBAs, and RBTs.
Learning Objectives: 1. Participants will describe how the current BACB Professional and Ethical Compliance Code applies to organizations providing ABA services. 2. Participants will identify effective strategies for assigning cases within the agency. 3. Participants will identify possible ethical dilemmas faced when providing ABA using an insurance carrier funding source. 4. Participants will identify agency-wide strategies for preventing ethical violations.
Keyword(s): Business Ethics, Ethics, Organizations, Service Delivery
 
 
Panel #397
CE Offered: BACB — 
Ethics
Crossing the Borders With Behavior Analysis: Barriers Encountered by Our Workforce When Interacting With Different Cultures
Monday, May 28, 2018
8:00 AM–8:50 AM
Manchester Grand Hyatt, Seaport Ballroom B
Area: PRA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Paula Ribeiro Braga Kenyon, Ph.D.
Chair: Shawn E Kenyon (Palm Springs Unified School District; Northeastern University)
PAULA RIBEIRO BRAGA KENYON (Trumpet Behavioral Health)
ZACHARY C. BIRD (Perkins School for the Blind)
MARCELO FROTA LOBATO BENVENUTI (USP)
Abstract: Board Certified Behavior Analysts (BCBA) are supervising therapists who deliver behavior analytic treatment in a variety of settings and across many different cultures. The Behavior Analyst certification is international and as such, BCBAs working abroad and within the United States often encounter cultural practices that do not align with our Professional and Ethical Code. The panelists will present examples of barriers encountered while providing services to different cultures, specifically in Brazil, the United Arab Emirates, the Mexican community in California, and the Deafblind community. Some of the issues that will be discussed include the use of technology and confidentiality, professional relationships, gift acceptance, and participation in caregiver training. The panelists will also discuss the impact of some cultural practices on the implementation of the guidelines from the Professional and Ethical Code for Behavior Analysts. Finally, the panelists will discuss training of therapists and supervisors, and the need to consider formal training on multi-cultural practices and the need to understand its impact on the implementation of our Professional and Ethical Code
Target Audience: BCBAs working in the applied field providing services to children with ASD and related disorders
Learning Objectives: Participants will learn to identify cultural practices that may be in conflict with the Professional and Ethical Code for Behavior Analysts Participants will learn how the Professional and Ethical Code for Behavior Analysts relates to specific practices Participants will be able to list training opportunities to increase awareness of cultural diversity in service delivery
 
 
Panel #398
CE Offered: BACB — 
Ethics
Ethicists Deconstruct Unethical Conduct
Monday, May 28, 2018
8:00 AM–8:50 AM
Manchester Grand Hyatt, Seaport Ballroom DE
Area: PRA/PCH; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Thomas L. Zane, Ph.D.
Chair: Thomas L. Zane (University of Kansas)
THOMAS L. ZANE (University of Kansas)
MARY JANE WEISS (Endicott College)
Abstract: This panel is a continuation of previous panel discussions at ABAI on Behavior Analysts Behaving Badly. This year we will present ethics cases and deconstruct them in front of the audience so they can see how we approach unethical conduct. An ethicist is a professional who is sought after for ethical advice and counsel; For this panel we have brought together three such behavior analysis ethicists who are regularly consulted to provide guidance on complex cases of unethical conduct. Toward the end of the session we will open the floor to questions from the audience and again each ethicist will respond so that the range of tactics and strategies will be apparent.
Target Audience: The target audience is BCBAs who are practicing in schools, homes and the community as well as clinics and agencies.
Learning Objectives: 1. Participants will be able to determine the basic principle underlying the ethics case, e.g. client right to treatment, conflict of interest, confidentiality. 2. Participants will be able to deconstruct the case into its basic elements and identify them. 3. Participants will be able to arrive at an ethical solution based on the underlying principle, basic elements, and specific items of the BACB Professional and Ethical Compliance Codes.
 
 
Panel #442
CE Offered: BACB — 
Ethics
CANCELED: "RAISE"ing Up Adults With Autism in the Workplace
Monday, May 28, 2018
11:00 AM–11:50 AM
Manchester Grand Hyatt, Grand Hall D
Area: AUT/CSS; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Cailey Rodgers, M.A.
Chair: Cailey Rodgers (Global Autism Project; Clinical Supervisor)
PHILIP COOK (Global Autism Project)
RUSTY HORRNIG-ROHAN (Global Autism Project)
JEN FISHER (Global Autism Project; RAISE)
Abstract: Longitudinal studies have shown that unemployment rates among adults are alarmingly high. What supports are necessary to ensure the success of vocational programs and how can these programs incorporate the needs of businesses and support local industries locally and internationally as well as addressing the needs of individuals with autism in the workplace? This panel will discuss the practical implications of a supported employment program using our RAISE program (Real Advancement Independence Social Skills and Empowerment) as a case study.
Target Audience: BCBA or equivalent
Learning Objectives: describe the obstacles to employment for adults with autism describe systemic barriers to gainful employment for individuals with autism spectrum disorder within the US describe systemic and cultural barriers to gainful employment for individuals with autism spectrum disorder internationally describe conditions necessary for the success of supported work environments
Keyword(s): adult services, advocacy, employment
 
 
Symposium #519
CE Offered: BACB — 
Ethics
Ethics and Professionalism: She Said What?!
Monday, May 28, 2018
4:00 PM–4:50 PM
Manchester Grand Hyatt, Seaport Ballroom A
Area: PRA/TBA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Thomas R. Freeman, M.S.
Chair: Thomas R. Freeman (ABA Technologies; Florida Institute of Technology)
Abstract: Behavior analysts face dilemmas everyday without obvious professional or ethical solutions. Practitioners have a science to help change behavior, but this isn't enough. Surrounding ethical contingencies must be considered when selecting the best course of action. The BACB's Professional and Ethical Compliance Code for Behavior AnalystsTM provides an excellent resource. The Code should guide decisions so that the best interest and well- being of the client is always prioritized. Application of the Compliance Code is not always clear-cut or easy, however, the Code elements provide a backdrop for ethical decision making. Practice using the Code will assist the practitioner in exploring appropriate options. This presentation will highlight a variety of real-life examples with identification of applicable Code elements and options for resolution. Scenarios will include the areas of child welfare, developmental disabilities, Autism Spectrum Disorder, Applied Behavior Analysis clinics, supervision, and academic settings. Participants will have the opportunity to interact and apply Code elements to existing scenarios and possible solutions.
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Code, Ethics, Professionalism, Supervision
Target Audience: Students in ABA graduate programs, BCaBAs, BCBAs, BCBA-Ds
Learning Objectives: Given a scenario, participants will identify ethical violations. Participants will identify the applicable Code element(s) from the Professional and Ethical Compliance Code for Behavior Analysts related to the scenario. Participants will be able to identify possible solutions or actions given an applied scenario.
 
Does the Golden Rule Apply to Our Field?
CHRISTI A. REED (ABA Technologies Inc.)
Abstract: Having the letters behind our name isn’t enough- it matters how we practice, how we treat others and how we share our science. Are we applying the Code and professionalism to all we do? This talk will link code elements and possible solutions to real life events in dealing with other professionals in providing services to individuals with ASD, DD as well as issues regarding professional development and teaching.
 
Ethics and Professionalism in Teaching and Disseminating
APRIL ROWLAND (ABA Technologies Inc)
Abstract: As behavior analysts we are tasked not only with behaving ethically ourselves, but often with conferring those standards to others, both within and outside our field. This presentation will encourage discussion on scenarios applicable to those teaching new professionals as well as the role of ethics and professionalism when disseminating behavior analysis to individuals outside of our field.
 
The Final Frontier: Ethics and the Internet
COREY L. ROBERTSON (ABA Tech; Florida Institute of Technology)
Abstract: Social media and increasingly accessible telecommunication technologies have helped ABA reach remote areas of the globe, bringing experts in touch with those who would otherwise not have access. But just who are these experts, and how much can they help? The Code applies to our digital behavior as well, so examples will be provided of ethical dilemmas, relevant code elements, and the appropriate course of action.
 
 
Symposium #532
CE Offered: BACB — 
Ethics
Help! What to do When Reality and the Ethical Code Conflict
Monday, May 28, 2018
5:00 PM–5:50 PM
Manchester Grand Hyatt, Seaport Ballroom A
Area: PRA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Susan Wilczynski, Ph.D.
Chair: Susan Wilczynski (Ball State University)
Abstract: The Behavior Analyst Certification Board's (BACB's) Professional and Ethical Compliance Code for Board Certified Behavior Analysts (BCBAs) describes the professional and ethical behavior that all BCBAs, Board Certified Assistant Behavior Analysts (BCaBAs), and Registered Behavior Technicians (RBTs) must adhere to (BACB, 2016). Supervision is an integral part to becoming a competent behavior analyst and integral to the service delivery of the RBT. Differing roles lead to different applications of the BACB's ethical code. Business owners, BCBAs, and RBTs all perform different aspects of service to their clients, therefore, their experience in applying the ethical code to real life situations often varies. It is crucial to discuss the role of supervision and how that relates to the ethical code, due to those instances in which parts of the ethical code conflict with each other, the role we perform, and the real world scenario that professionals are faced with. Professionals often experience situations where there is no simple solution whereby the BACB's ethical code and reality meet up seamlessly, therefore, our symposium seeks to compare the multitude of viewpoints ranging from business owner to RBT and discuss suggestions for resolving these differences in point of view in an ethical way.
Instruction Level: Basic
Keyword(s): Ethical Code, Practice Management, Supervision
Target Audience: Board certified behavior analysts, Board Certified Assistant Behavior Analysts, Registered Behavior Technicians, Business Owners
Learning Objectives: 1. Consider the BACB's ethical code in accordance with your professional role in the field of behavior analysis. 2. Consider how the ethical code applies to real world context and scenarios. 3. Provide potential strategies for resolving differences in point of view in an ethical way.
 
Help! What to do When Reality and the Ethical Code Conflict: Business Owners' Perspective
ANN M. BALOSKI (BehaviorWorks ABA)
Abstract: The Behavior Analyst Certification Board's (BACB's) Professional and Ethical Compliance Code for Board Certified Behavior Analysts (BCBAs) describes the professional and ethical behavior that all BCBAs, Board Certified Assistant Behavior Analysts (BCaBAs), and Registered Behavior Technicians (RBTs) must adhere to (BACB, 2016). Supervision is an integral part to becoming a competent behavior analyst and integral to the service delivery of the RBT. Differing roles lead to different applications of the BACB's ethical code. Business owners, BCBAs, and RBTs all perform different aspects of service to their clients, therefore, their experience in applying the ethical code to real life situations often varies. It is crucial to discuss the role of supervision and how that relates to the ethical code, due to those instances in which parts of the ethical code conflict with each other, the role we perform, and the real world scenario that professionals are faced with. Professionals often experience situations where there is no simple solution whereby the BACB's ethical code and reality meet up seamlessly, therefore, our symposium seeks to compare the multitude of viewpoints ranging from business owner to RBT and discuss suggestions for resolving these differences in point of view in an ethical way.
 
Help! What to do When Reality and the Ethical Code Conflict: Board Certified Behavior Analyst Perspective
MOLLY QUINN (BehaviorWorks ABA)
Abstract: The Behavior Analyst Certification Board's (BACB's) Professional and Ethical Compliance Code for Board Certified Behavior Analysts (BCBAs) describes the professional and ethical behavior that all BCBAs, Board Certified Assistant Behavior Analysts (BCaBAs), and Registered Behavior Technicians (RBTs) must adhere to (BACB, 2016). Supervision is an integral part to becoming a competent behavior analyst and integral to the service delivery of the RBT. Differing roles lead to different applications of the BACB's ethical code. Business owners, BCBAs, and RBTs all perform different aspects of service to their clients, therefore, their experience in applying the ethical code to real life situations often varies. It is crucial to discuss the role of supervision and how that relates to the ethical code, due to those instances in which parts of the ethical code conflict with each other, the role we perform, and the real world scenario that professionals are faced with. Professionals often experience situations where there is no simple solution whereby the BACB's ethical code and reality meet up seamlessly, therefore, our symposium seeks to compare the multitude of viewpoints ranging from business owner to RBT and discuss suggestions for resolving these differences in point of view in an ethical way.
 
Help! What to do When Reality and the Ethical Code Conflict: Registered Behavior Technician Perspective
AMANDA HENDERSON (Ball State University)
Abstract: The Behavior Analyst Certification Board's (BACB's) Professional and Ethical Compliance Code for Board Certified Behavior Analysts (BCBAs) describes the professional and ethical behavior that all BCBAs, Board Certified Assistant Behavior Analysts (BCaBAs), and Registered Behavior Technicians (RBTs) must adhere to (BACB, 2016). Supervision is an integral part to becoming a competent behavior analyst and integral to the service delivery of the RBT. Differing roles lead to different applications of the BACB's ethical code. Business owners, BCBAs, and RBTs all perform different aspects of service to their clients, therefore, their experience in applying the ethical code to real life situations often varies. It is crucial to discuss the role of supervision and how that relates to the ethical code, due to those instances in which parts of the ethical code conflict with each other, the role we perform, and the real world scenario that professionals are faced with. Professionals often experience situations where there is no simple solution whereby the BACB's ethical code and reality meet up seamlessly, therefore, our symposium seeks to compare the multitude of viewpoints ranging from business owner to RBT and discuss suggestions for resolving these differences in point of view in an ethical way.
 

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