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Association for Behavior Analysis International

The Association for Behavior Analysis International® (ABAI) is a nonprofit membership organization with the mission to contribute to the well-being of society by developing, enhancing, and supporting the growth and vitality of the science of behavior analysis through research, education, and practice.

12th Annual Autism Conference; Miami, FL; 2018

Program by Day for Tuesday, February 6, 2018


 

Special Event #10
Opening Remarks
Tuesday, February 6, 2018
8:15 AM–8:30 AM
Regency Ballroom
Chair: Ruth Anne Rehfeldt (Southern Illinois University)
The conference co-chairs will present opening remarks.
 
 
Invited Paper Session #11
CE Offered: PSY/BACB/QABA/NASP
Mindfulness-Based Interventions for People With Autism and Their Caregivers
Tuesday, February 6, 2018
8:30 AM–9:20 AM
Regency Ballroom
Area: AUT
Instruction Level: Intermediate
CE Instructor: Nirbhay N. Singh, Ph.D.
Chair: Ruth Anne Rehfeldt (Southern Illinois University)
NIRBHAY N. SINGH (Medical College of Georgia, Augusta University)
Nirb Singh is a Clinical Professor of Psychiatry and Health Behavior at the Medical College of Georgia, Augusta University, GA. and CEO of MacTavish Behavioral Health, LLC in Raleigh, NC. He is a Fellow of both the American Psychological Association and the American Psychological Society. He has published 21 books and over 650 articles and book chapters. He is the editor-in-chief of three journals—Mindfulness, Advances in Neurodevelopmental Disorders, and the Journal of Child and Family Studies, and three book series. He has broad research interests that include mindfulness-based interventions, and assistive technology for people with severe/profound intellectual and multiple disabilities, Alzheimer’s disease, post-coma in minimally conscious state, and others with neurodegenerative diseases. He is the developer of several mindfulness-based interventions, including Mindfulness-Based Positive Behavior Support (MBPBS).
Abstract: People with autism spectrum disorder exhibit behaviors that may negatively impact their own quality of life as well as of their caregivers. Their challenging behaviors are correlated with negative psychological outcomes in their caregivers, such as stress, anxiety, and depression. Mindfulness-based interventions provide an evidence-based approach for alleviating emotional dysregulation in people with various psychological, medical, and physical problems. Mindfulness involves awareness and nonjudgmental acceptance of thoughts, emotions, feelings, and perceptions in the present moment. A mindful individual is able to reflect and respond to events rather than automatically react to them. This process of self-regulation in the present moment has been associated with enhanced quality of life. This presentation will review current research on mindfulness-based interventions for both people with autism and their caregivers.
Target Audience: Board certified behavior analysts, licensed psychologists, graduate students.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) Define and describe mindfulness, (2) Describe current status of mindfulness-based interventions for people with autism and their caregivers, (3) Describe how specific mindfulness-based strategies can be used by individuals with autism to self-manage their angst, anger and aggression, (4) Describe how caregivers can use mindfulness-based strategies to manage their stress and burnout.
 
 
Invited Paper Session #12
CE Offered: PSY/BACB/QABA/NASP
Training Caregivers to Conduct Functional Analyses and Function-Based Interventions for Severe Problem Behavior
Tuesday, February 6, 2018
9:30 AM–10:20 AM
Regency Ballroom
Area: AUT
Instruction Level: Basic
CE Instructor: Patricia F. Kurtz, Ph.D.
Chair: Jonathan J. Tarbox (University of Southern California; FirstSteps for Kids)
PATRICIA F. KURTZ (Kennedy Krieger Institute)

Patricia F. Kurtz is an Associate Professor at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. She serves as the Director of the Outpatient Programs of Kennedy Krieger Institute’s Neurobehavioral Unit, which provides intensive assessment and treatment for persons with intellectual and developmental disabilities who exhibit severe problem behavior.  Dr. Kurtz’s clinical and research activities focus on functional analysis and treatment approaches for problem behavior and their utility in outpatient service settings; parent/staff training; generalization of treatment effects and long-term outcome following inpatient or outpatient treatment; and early identification and prevention of self-injurious behavior.

Abstract: Individuals with autism are at increased risk of developing severe behavior problems such as self-injury and aggression. Problem behavior remains among the most serious challenges for the habilitation of persons with autism, and the largest barrier to community integration. Based on decades of research, a best practices model has emerged whereby problem behavior is assessed via functional analysis (Iwata et al, 1982/1994) to determine the environmental variables that occasion and maintain the behavior (the function); a treatment is then selected that matches that function. Inclusion of parents/caregivers in assessment of problem behavior can improve functional analysis accuracy and produce effective interventions. This presentation will review clinical practices and research findings demonstrating the efficacy of using caregivers as therapists in functional analyses and treatment services for severe problem behavior.
Target Audience: PENDING
Learning Objectives: PENDING
 
 
Invited Paper Session #13
CE Offered: PSY/BACB/QABA/NASP
Equivalence-Based Instruction in Early Intensive Behavioral Intervention
Tuesday, February 6, 2018
11:00 AM–11:50 AM
Regency Ballroom
Area: AUT
CE Instructor: Caio F. Miguel, Ph.D.
Chair: Jonathan J. Tarbox (University of Southern California; FirstSteps for Kids)
CAIO F. MIGUEL (California State University, Sacramento)
Dr. Caio Miguel is a Professor of Psychology and Director of the Verbal Behavior Research Laboratory at California State University, Sacramento. He is also an adjunct faculty at Endicott College, MA, and at the University of São Paulo, Brazil. Dr. Miguel has published 60 articles and book chapters on basic and applied research related to verbal behavior and derived stimulus relations. He is the past-editor of The Analysis of Verbal Behavior (TAVB) and currently serves as an Associate Editor for the Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis (JABA). He is the recipient of the 2013-2014 award for outstanding scholarly work by the College of Social Sciences and Interdisciplinary Studies at Sacramento State, and the 2014 Outstanding Mentor Award by the Association for Behavior Analysis International. Dr. Miguel is a regular speaker at conferences all over the world.
Abstract: Despite several applied demonstrations of emergent (novel) performances produced through conditional discrimination training, the technology from the stimulus equivalence literature has not yet been well integrated into early intensive intervention curricula. The purpose of this talk is to describe the implications of using equivalence-based instruction for teaching basic and advanced skills to preschool children with autism. We will review the stimulus equivalence paradigm and present examples from different translational and applied studies that used this technology to teach reading, geography, coin identification, activity schedules, and music to children with autism. Implications for practice and directions for future applied research will be discussed.
Target Audience: Board certified behavior analysts, licensed psychologists, graduate students.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) define different procedures to teach conditional discrimination; (2) discuss the different training structures to produce equivalence classes; (3) program equivalence-based instruction to teach a variety of academic and cognitive skills.
 
 
Invited Paper Session #14
CE Offered: PSY/BACB/QABA/NASP
Baby Siblings of Children With Autism: Early Behavior-Analytic Interventions With Infants "At Risk"
Tuesday, February 6, 2018
12:00 PM–12:50 PM
Regency Ballroom
Area: AUT
Instruction Level: Basic
CE Instructor: Martha Pelaez, Ph.D.
Chair: Jonathan J. Tarbox (University of Southern California; FirstSteps for Kids)
MARTHA PELAEZ (Florida International University)
Martha Pelaez is a Frost Professor at the College of Education, Florida International University. She has studied mother-infant interactions, infant social learning processes, and behavior-analytic interventions with infants at risk. Her research has been supported by NIH grants. She is the founding Editor of the Behavior Development Bulletin and her theoretical contributions have included a taxonomy of rule-governed behavior and a textbook on child development (with G. Novak, 2004). Dr. Pelaez has published more than 100 articles in refereed journals (including The American Psychologist and the journal of Child Development) and several monographs. She was the recipient from FIU of the Faculty Research Award twice and the Faculty Service Award, and past member of the Florida Board of Governors.
Abstract: The behavior of young siblings of children with autism has been documented extensively in controlled longitudinal studies using large samples. Language and communicative abilities have been compared between non-autistic siblings and toddlers with no family history of autism. Between the ages 18-27 months the siblings of children with autism have scored below average in expressive language and composite IQ, showed lower mean receptive language, adaptive behavior, and social communication skills, used fewer words, gestures, and were less responsive to social smiles than the comparison toddlers. Infants siblings of children with ASD often show difficulties learning joint attention and referential communication. These findings suggest that infant difficulties with nonverbal communication can predict later language development problems. At an early age, the behavior of non-autistic siblings we should monitored closely and behavioral interventions should be implemented early in development to minimize some of these issues. This presentation will illustrate several procedures that use behavioral principles and single-subject designs with infants at-risk of early communication impairments. Specifically, the presentation will provide examples of behavior-analytic interventions that are useful to establish infant eye contact, vocalizations, joint attention, and social referencing skills.
Target Audience: Board certified behavior analysts, licensed psychologists, graduate students.
Learning Objectives: Pending.
 
 
Special Event #15
Closing Remarks
Tuesday, February 6, 2018
1:00 PM–1:15 PM
Regency Ballroom
Chair: Jonathan J. Tarbox (University of Southern California; FirstSteps for Kids)
The conference co-chairs will present closing remarks.
 

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