IT should be notified now!

Association for Behavior Analysis International

The Association for Behavior Analysis International® (ABAI) is a nonprofit membership organization with the mission to contribute to the well-being of society by developing, enhancing, and supporting the growth and vitality of the science of behavior analysis through research, education, and practice.

43rd Annual Convention; Denver, CO; 2017

Program by Day for Friday, May 26, 2017


 

Workshop #W37
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
CANCELED: Expanding Our Reach: Applied Behavior Analysis Goes Bananas
Friday, May 26, 2017
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
Hyatt Regency
Area: AAB; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Susan G. Friedman, Ph.D.
SUSAN G. FRIEDMAN (Utah State University), KENNETH T. RAMIREZ (John G. Shedd Aquarium)
Description: This workshop is designed for all behavior analysts interested in improving the welfare of animals in the wild and in human care through the systematic application of applied behavior analysis principles and procedures, and ethical standards. Topics include the significance of the natural science approach to understanding and changing behavior, examples of function based intervention design with exotic and companion animals, errorless learning approaches, conditioning non-food reinforcers, concept training, and conservation training.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, participants will be able to: (1) Explain the function of behavior from an evolutionary perspective; (2) Describe at least one animal example of functional analysis and intervention design; (3) List at least 3 antecedent arrangements to reduce learner error; (4) Identify the benefits to training of conditioning non-food reinforcers; (5) Describe a procedure for training concepts with animal learners; (6) Explain the relevance training to animal conservation.
Activities: Workshop objectives will be met through a balanced presentation of lecture, video observation, and group discussion. Core content will be taught through lecture, and video demonstrations of strategies will be provided.
Audience: This workshop is relevant to all attendees of ABAI conference interested in animal applications of ABA.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
 
 
Workshop #W38
CE Offered: BACB/PSY/QABA — 
Ethics
Extending Behavior Analysis in Zoos and Aquariums
Friday, May 26, 2017
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
Denver Zoo
Area: AAB/TBA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Lindsay Renee Mehrkam, Ph.D.
LINDSAY RENEE MEHRKAM (Monmouth University), NICOLE R. DOREY (University of Florida), Emily Insalaco (Denver Zoo)
Description: Note: This 6-hour workshop will take place entirely at the Denver Zoo. Today’s accredited zoos and aquariums are held to high standards of animal welfare. This involves assessment, implementation, and evaluation of current animal husbandry practices across a wide range of species - a task for which behavior analysis is well suited. This workshop will provide attendees with an overview of how behavior analytic methods are being extended in zoo settings to evaluate enrichment and training effectiveness. Participants will travel to world-renowned Denver Zoo and directly observe how behavioral principles are being used to guide animal care practices in zoos. Participants will learn how to successfully implement behavioral assessments using single-subject designs in a zoo setting. Participants will be guided through video demonstrations of preference assessments and positive reinforcement training with a variety of zoo species to observe the generalizability of these procedures. Attendees will also participate in discussions on future directions for behavior analysts in these nontraditional animal settings. The registration fee includes the cost of workshop materials as well as transportation to and from the Denver Zoo.* Attendees will meet at the headquarters hotel to take a shuttle to the zoo, and will return in time to attend afternoon workshops. Additional details will be communicated directly by the workshop presenters after registration has closed. *A portion of the proceeds will go to the Denver Zoological Society Enrichment Fund.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) Operationally define environmental enrichment and identify ways in which enrichment strategies are evaluated and deemed effective; (2)Identify, review, and critique applications of operant conditioning in behavioral husbandry practices for variety of species; (3)Recognize and discuss variables to consider to ensure ethical and effective implementation and evaluation of behavioral assessments in zoos and aquariums using single-subject designs.
Activities: Workshop objectives will be met through a balanced presentation of lecture, guided practice, direct observation, and group discussion. Core content will be taught through lecture and video demonstrations of strategies and procedures will be provided. Participants will be encouraged to participate in open discussions about content and future directions for practical application. Supplemental materials for reviewing training plans and ethograms will also be provided.
Audience: This workshop is designed for individuals interested in the application of behavior analytic principles in zoos and aquariums. Participants will learn how zoos develop and review training and enrichment programs using single-subject design methodology and individual-level analysis to facilitate husbandry goals for a variety of species. Participants will also learn how to successfully implement assessment and evaluation tools for husbandry strategies in zoological settings.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
Keyword(s): animal training, enrichment, preference assessment, zoo
 
Workshop #W39
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Mastered PECS: What's Next? Transitioning from PECS to Speech Generating Devices
Friday, May 26, 2017
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
Hyatt Regency, Granite C
Area: AUT/DDA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Jesseca Collins, M.Ed.
JESSECA COLLINS (Pyramid Educational Consultants), CATHERINE HORTON (Pyramid Educational Consultants), PAIGE PANETTA (Pyramid Educational Consultants)
Description: High-tech speech generating devices (SGD) are being used more frequently with children with autism spectrum disorder. While research is expanding on the use of various communication apps on smart tablets, many recent publications are fraught with procedural and logical problems. There are no standard protocols established regarding how to teach the use of an SGD. The Picture Exchange Communication System (PECS) is an evidence-based protocol. This workshop will review the key elements that are necessary to demonstrate that the use of an SGD would qualify as verbal behavior (Skinner, 1957) and which teaching issues, especially regarding discrimination, should be incorporated into training protocols. We will briefly review the main components of the PECS protocol and review how to best transition users to an SGD. We will review published guidelines (Frost and McGowan, 2012) identifying key variables that may influence successful transitioning. We will review recent studies looking at the effectiveness of either attempting to begin communication training with an SGD or how to effectively transition from PECS. Participants are encouraged to bring either an SGD or an app for a tablet to actively practice key transitional steps including how to identify SGD features that may influence learning.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) describe key elements to demonstrate verbal behavior via SGD use; (2) describe key elements of the PECS protocol; (3) describe assessment targets to transition from PECS to an SGD; and (4) describe how to evaluate functional use of an SGD.
Activities: Review of recent literature regarding SGD use, review PECS protocol, review published guidelines on how to effectively transition from PECS to SGD, review videos demonstrating effective use and potential problems with transitions, and review how to transition from PECS to SGDs and/or tablet apps brought to workshop by participants.
Audience: Anyone working with current users of PECS or with individuals for whom an SGD or tablet app is being considered. This may include behavior analysts, speech/language pathologists, teachers or others involved with communication training with children and adults with disabilities including ASD.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Alternative Communication, Assistive Technology, Augmentative Communication, Teaching SGD
 
Workshop #W40
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Exploring the Systematic Use of Self-Monitoring as a Behavioral Intervention: The Self & Match System
Friday, May 26, 2017
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
Hyatt Regency, Mineral Hall C
Area: AUT/EDC; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Katharine M. Croce, Ed.D.
KATHARINE M. CROCE (Chicago School of Professional Psychology; Bucks County Intermediate Unit), JAMIE SIDEN SALTER (San Diego County Office of Education)
Description: This interactive andhands-onworkshop will provide an excellent opportunity for individuals to learn a well-defined, systematic self-monitoring intervention and motivational system. Participants attending this workshop will leave with a comprehensive tool in hand to implement immediately. This session will explore peer-reviewed research that supports the implementation of self-monitoring systems for students of various ages and developmental levels. A discussion of self-monitoring procedures incorporating a "match" component will be presented, with specific focus on the Self & Match System, a user-friendly, easy to implement, empirically-supported system. Participants in this training will acquire a systematic guide to planning self-monitoring systems, as well as a Self & Match manual with substantial training materials. Additionally, participants will strengthen their knowledge of necessary considerations prior to implementing any self-monitoring or motivational system. The Self & Match System has been used internationally to support individuals with emotional behavior disorders, autism, learning disabilities, and unidentified students in general education. Self & Match can be incorporated into individualized behavior systems, class-wide, and school-wide management procedures as a part of SWPBIS and has been successfully implemented in a variety of settings; including (but not limited to): public and private schools, clinics, homes, and recreational settings.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) identify the research-based benefits of self-monitoring; (2) Effectively apply, individualize, and monitor progress of a self-monitoring system; (3) Identify the necessary components of an effective motivational system; (4) Identify the importance of pre-treatment planning on the effectiveness of intervention; (5) Identify the basic components of the Self & Match System; (6) Systematically individualize an intervention based on collaborative and critical thinking; (7) Create a Self & Match self-monitoring system to implement in their workplace; (8) systematically consider function in the development of self-monitoring interventions and reinforcement opportunities.
Activities: During the course of this hands-on workshop, participants will strengthen the skills needed to effectively develop self-monitoring interventions incorporating a match component. This workshop will review the purpose/rationale of self-monitoring, the benefits of self-monitoring, the Self & Match system, and consider the role of technology in supporting this behavioral intervention. Additionally, participants will interactively complete a systematic considerations guide prior to implementation to lead them on their way to creating their own Self & Match System. The format combines lecture, small group collaboration, whole group responding utilizing interactive digital polling software, and discussion. Core content will be taught through a combination of lecture, video examples, data analysis, and guided practice.
Audience: Participants will engage in active learning to increase their knowledge of implementing systematic self-monitoring as a behavior intervention. Workshop attendees will acquire a systematic guide to planning self-monitoring systems, as well as a Self & Match manual with substantial training materials. This workshop is designed for behavior analysts, consultants, school psychologists, autism specialists, special educators, teachers, administrators, parents, students, and/or others who primarily support individuals from pre-K to 21 in school, home, or clinic settings. Great workshop for individuals and/or teams!
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Autism, behavior intervention, school, self-monitoring
 
Workshop #W41
CE Offered: PSY/BACB — 
Ethics
Developing an Effective Skill-Based Treatment Following a Safe and Efficient Functional Analysis Model
Friday, May 26, 2017
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
Hyatt Regency, Centennial Ballroom A
Area: AUT/PRA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Joshua Jessel, Ph.D.
JOSHUA JESSEL (Child Study Center), MAHSHID GHAEMMAGHAMI (University of the Pacific)
Description: The functional analysis is a powerful methodological tool that can provide an effective and humane treatment for problem behavior (Hanley, Iwata, & McCord, 2003). Despite its growing empirical support, a recent survey (Oliver, Pratt, & Normand, 2015) suggests that the majority of practicing behavior analysts are not conducting functional analyses to inform treatment considerations. Practitioners may be avoiding the functional analysis because of concerns that it places the patient or clinician in a dangerous environment and requires too much time or resources. We will be teaching the audience how to conduct a safe functional analysis that takes an average of 25 min and as little as 5 min based on our research (e.g., Jessel, Hanley, & Ghaemmaghami, 2016; Ghaemmaghami, Hanley, & Jessel, 2016) and collection of replications from clinical practice. We will then discuss how to use the results of the functional analysis to design effective, skill-based treatments that include the teaching of complex and developmentally appropriate functional communication skills, and skill-based delay tolerance procedures that increase other social behaviors such as compliance, task engagement, and social interaction, in order to effect more global changes in the functional repertoires needed to be successful in contextually complex environments with natural reinforcement contingencies.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will be able to: (1) conduct a functional analysis of problem behavior in 25 minutes; (2) teach a child complex functional communication skills; (3) teach a child how to tolerate delays and denials to reinforcement; (4) program for generalization and maintenance of these skills.
Activities: The format combines lecture, small group activities, large group discussions, and video observations.
Audience: BCBA-Ds, BCBAs, BCaBAs, licensed psychologists, and other behavior analytic providers who need to learn a fast and safe approach to assessing and treating problem behavior. This approach has been empirically validated for those with and without intellectual disabilities, with children as young as 1 and adults as old as 30, and can be conducted in multiple contexts such as classrooms, clinics, or homes.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): communication training, functional analysis, problem behavior, tolerance training
 
Workshop #W42
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Towards Identifying, Shaping, and Maintaining Professional Soft Skills for Behavior-Analytic Practitioners
Friday, May 26, 2017
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
Hyatt Regency, Mineral Hall E
Area: AUT/PRA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Jana M. Sarno, M.A.
JANA M. SARNO (Autism Home Support Services), KATRINA OSTMEYER (Integrated Behavioral Technologies, Inc.), LINDA S. HEITZMAN-POWELL (The University of Kansas Medical Center)
Description: Soft skills are personal attributes that enable someone to interact effectively and harmoniously with other people such as effective problem-solving, active listening, managing transitions/change, and collaboration skills. Beyond technical abilities, soft skills are imperative as behavior analysts initiate, develop, and sustain relationships with clients and families. Going a step further, it is not enough to identify and design effective and sustainable interventions; rather, clinical effectiveness also hinges on the ability of the behavior analyst to master more traditional psychology domains (e.g., active listening, establishing a therapeutic relationship, giving and receiving feedback from others, and promoting parent acceptability/treatment adherence; Heitzman-Powell, White, & Perrin, 2007). Soft skills, like technical skills, can be introduced, acquired, and shaped in our professional repertoires, using Behavioral Skills Training (BST). Specifically, the soft skills of active listening, giving feedback, receiving feedback, leadership, collaboration, and managing change/transitions will be discussed. A curriculum using BST will be provided to conceptualize, teach, and maintain professional soft skills. The curriculum includes task analyses for each skill, lecture materials, role-play opportunities, observations, and performance feedback. Data will also be presented from pilot projects using this curriculum
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) Define at least three behavior analytic principles that are used in the conceptualization of soft skills; (2) Provide a behavior analytic definition of six key soft skills; (3) Define and describe key behaviors that are to be exhibited for successful demonstration of six key soft skills; (4) Engage in identified behaviors for each of the six key soft skills through role play scenarios, as measured by the completion of the task analysis checklist.
Activities: Workshop objectives will be met through various methods including lecture with supporting materials (i.e., task analyses, review and coding of videos, and survey measures), role-play opportunities with feedback from the workshop presenters, and small- and whole-group discussions. Competency checks and active responding by participants during the workshop will also occur.
Audience: BCBAs; Supervisors, Licensed Behavior Analysts, and BCaBAs
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): professional development
 
Workshop #W43
CE Offered: BACB/PSY/QABA
Running Effective Behavior Analytic Social Skills Groups
Friday, May 26, 2017
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
Hyatt Regency, Centennial Ballroom F
Area: AUT; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Ashley Rodman, M.S.
ASHLEY RODMAN (Advances Learning Center), MEGHAN GLADU (Advances Learning Center), FRANCES NIEVES SERRET (Advances Learning Center), GINETTE WILSON BISHOP (Advances Learning Center), KATHERINE A. JOHNSON (Advances Learning Center)
Description: Teaching social skills in a group setting requires a multitude of skills: grouping students in effective clusters, using group contingencies, taking data on multiple students at once, and individualizing prompt levels and reinforcement schedules while running effective activities that provide students with frequent opportunities to respond to social stimuli. This workshop will teach specific learning activities that target skills in the domains of body language, conversation, independent, pretend, and cooperative play, social conventions, and perspective-taking. It will also provide training on how, when, and why to use group contingencies and give strategies for individualizing social instruction in a group setting.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) Use a variety of activities designed to provide students with frequent opportunities to respond to social cues; (2) Facilitate activities that teach body language, conversation, independent, pretend, and cooperative play, social conventions, and perspective-taking; (3) Group students into effective learning clusters; (4) Use several different group contingencies and identify the reasons behind using each type of contingency; (5) Collect data on multiple students; (6) Individualize prompt levels and reinforcement schedules while running an instructional activity with several students; (7) Take procedural integrity and reliability measures on social skills group leaders.
Activities: Alternating between lecture and hands-on activities, participants will work in groups to complete guided notes and case studies and participate in video-modeled activities and role-plays.
Audience: The intended audience includes Board Certified Behavior Analysts who train staff to run social skills groups; teachers, SLP's, behavioral instructors, or therapists who run social skills groups; school staff intending to implement social skills instruction as a part of their curriculum; and anyone currently running social skills groups or wishing to run them in the future.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W44
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Using the VB-MAPP to Assess and Program for Early and Intermediate Learners With Autism
Friday, May 26, 2017
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
Hyatt Regency, Centennial Ballroom B
Area: AUT/VRB; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Mary Lynch Barbera, Ph.D.
MARY LYNCH BARBERA (Barbera Behavior Consulting, LLC)
Description: Children with autism need effective and individualized ABA programming in order to reach their fullest potentials. This workshop will utilize B.F. Skinner’s analysis of verbal behavior and specifically Dr. Mark Sundberg’s VB-MAPP Assessment and Curriculum Guide (2008) to provide a framework for assessing and programming for children with autism. Dr. Barbera will give an overview of her book: The Verbal Behavior Approach: How to Teach Children with Autism and Related Disorders (2007) and the VB-MAPP (Sundberg, 2008). She will then highlight several strategies that can be implemented immediately to assess and teach early and intermediate learners more effectively. In addition to providing participants with specific ways to improve milestone scores, especially in the areas of language, this workshop will also provide information on ways to reduce scores on the barriers assessment and strategies to improve transition assessment scores on the VB-MAPP for both early and intermediate learners.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, participants will be able to: (1) Discuss advantages of utilizing B.F. Skinner's analysis of verbal behavior and utilizing the VB-MAPP for assessing and programming for early and intermediate learners with autism; (2) Discuss the general abilities of Level 1, Level 2, and Level 3 VB-MAPP learners and general programming guidelines based on each level; (3) Describe 3 strategies to reduce the Barriers assessment score on the VB-MAPP; (4) Discuss the importance of utilizing all parts of the VB-MAPP including the transition assessment and using this tool to program for skills such as toileting, feeding, and self-care.
Activities: Through lecture, video examples and group activities, the participants will leave with a better understanding of Applied Behavior Analysis utilizing the VB-MAPP assessment and curriculum guide as it relates to programming for both early and intermediate learners with autism.
Audience: The primary audience for this workshop is BCBAs, licensed psychologists, and educators working in ABA settings with children with autism. Participants should have some familiarity with Skinner's analysis of verbal behavior, the elementary verbal operants and the VB-MAPP. BCaBAs, students, and parents with strong backgrounds in ABA/VB are also welcome.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): VB Approach, VB-MAPP
 
Workshop #W45
CE Offered: PSY/BACB — 
Supervision
CANCELED: Developmentally Appropriate Applied Behavioral Analysis: How to Accelerate Progress
Friday, May 26, 2017
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
Hyatt Regency
Area: AUT; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Matthew A.T. Lehman, M.S.
LAUREN ELDER (ABA Behavior Therapies & Testing), MATTHEW A.T. LEHMAN (ABA Behavior Therapies & Testing), KAT CHAPMAN (ABA Behavior Therapies & Testing)
Description: When ABA is delivered using developmentally appropriate treatment targets, and delivered with developmentally appropriate strategies treatment progress is accelerated. Generalization is easy, and children are motivated to learn. Research supporting the use of developmentally appropriate ABA will be reviewed, as well as practical strategies for agencies and providers. Strengths and limitations of the approaches will be covered. Specific treatment model examples such as ESDM, PRT and JASPER will be used as illustrations of the principles. Information on typical learning sequences and curriculum will be provided. Examples will include infants through adults. Resources for additional training and information will be provided.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) State the advantages of developmentally appropriate ABA; (2) List relevant treatment models, the age range for which they are appropriate and how to access training in those models; (3) Provide examples of developmentally appropriate strategies and treatment targets for infants through adults; (4) Explain the empirical support behind developmentally appropriate ABA.
Activities: The workshop format combines lecture, small group discussion, video review, small group activities such as practice writing treatment objectives, and role play to practice treatment strategies.
Audience: BCBAs, BCaBAs, other treatment providers, agency owners
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): developmental ABA, early intervention, ESDM, PRT
 
 
Workshop #W46
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
CANCELED: Elevating Decision Making With the Standard Celeration Chart
Friday, May 26, 2017
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
Hyatt Regency
Area: AUT/EDC; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Richard M. Kubina, Ph.D.
RICHARD M. KUBINA (Penn State)
Description: Behavior analysts take great care in observing and recording data. After the recording process, data are then placed on a visual display. Line graphs form the main device used to interpret the rigorously collected data. Data deserve the best analytic tool for the analysis, interpretation, data decision making, and communication of data. Such a visual device exists in the Standard Celeration Chart (SCC). The current presentation will begin with facts showing the Standard Celeration Chart is a 10x better tool for handling all aspects of time series visual display when compared to the predominant nonstandard linear graph. The majority of the day will focus on teaching workshop participants how to use the SCC. Participants will learn how to enter data and read data. Furthermore, all of the basic conventions for charting human performance will be covered. Participants will learn how to understand data within (i.e., celeration, bounce, improvement index) and between condition (frequency multiplier, celebration multiplier, bounce change, improvement index change) analyses. Basic decision making involving aim stars, aim bands, and celeration aims will also be presented. The workshop will include teaching important concepts, then having participants practice applying the concepts. Guided feedback and practice will occur throughout all topics.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) compare different graphical features between nonstandard linear graphs and Standard Celeration Charts; (2) chart frequency data in real time on Standard Celeration Charts; (3) compare the difference between absolute and relative change; (4) compare the difference between celeration and trend; (5) state the advantages of quantifying behavior change features on the SCC; (6) read and state celeration and bounce values.
Activities: Instructional strategies include: lecture, discussion, and guided and independent practice. Workshop objectives will be met through a balanced presentation of lecture, guided practice, video observation, and individual/group participation/discussion. Core content will be taught through lecture and video demonstrations of strategies will be provided. The format combines lecture, small group activities, guided practice, and frequency building exercises.
Audience: Basic
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
 
 
Workshop #W47
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
The Use of Behavioral Interventions to Teach Developmentally Appropriate Play Skills
Friday, May 26, 2017
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
Hyatt Regency, Granite A
Area: AUT/PRA; Domain: Basic Research
CE Instructor: Nancy J. Champlin, M.A.
NANCY J. CHAMPLIN (ACI Learning Centers), MELISSA SCHISSLER (ACI Learning Centers)
Description: Research supports evidence-based play interventions impact on future communication and language skills, cognitive functioning, as well as social interactions for individuals with autism and other developmental disabilities. Sigman and Ruskin, 1999, found a correlation between the ability to engage in appropriate functional play and early language ability with long-term gains in expressive vocabulary. Encompassing a developmental sequence of play with behavioral interventions should be the focus of programming (Lifter, 2011). Based upon the instructors' clinical and research experience teaching functional play through sociodramatic play, participants will learn how to incorporate the developmental sequences of play and language to systematically teach play, from assessment through mastery criteria. The ACI Play Protocol incorporates a systematic approach to teaching preschool-aged children appropriate play skills and language. Play components, which include appropriate play with figures (dolls/stuffed animals), adults, and peers are taught using individualized treatment packages. Specific skills include abstract play with and without objects, rotating between play schemes, combining items from 2 or more play schemes, initiating, responding and expanding on current play targets. Workshop objectives will be met by alternating between didactic instruction, discussion, video modeling, and small group activities including role plays.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) discuss the developmental stages of play for typically developing children; (2)discuss the language development during play for typically developing children; (3) assess play and implement behaviorally-based interventions to teach each developmental stage of play; (4)modify play at each developmental stage of play; (5) assess mastery and track data for each developmental stage of play.
Activities: Workshop objectives will be met by alternating between didactic instruction, discussion, modeling, and small group activities including role modeling.
Audience: Intermediate
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W48
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Developing Vocal Verbal Behavior: Foundation Skills and Target Selection for Early Speech Learners
Friday, May 26, 2017
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
Hyatt Regency, Centennial Ballroom C
Area: AUT/VRB; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Barbara E. Esch, Ph.D.
BARBARA E. ESCH (Esch Behavior Consultants, LLC)
Description: Failure to acquire vocal behavior presents teaching challenges for those who are responsible for helping an individual learn to speak. When vocalizing is weak or nonexistent, there is little behavior that can come under the control of verbal contingencies (e.g., mand, tact, intraverbal) and, thus, functional speech may not develop. Key to establishing vocal verbal behavior is the establishment of the echoic repertoire, but this, too, requires certain foundation skills to support such responding. This workshop will describe critical skills required to support early speech learning, how to assess these skills, and how to appropriately select and sequence targets to achieve fluency in vocalizing and, in turn, how to establish those vocalizations as functional (communicative) responses. A brief review of behavioral research supporting development of vocal verbal behavior will describe the conceptual basis for such evidence and application consistent with behavior analytic practices. The content will include a focus on developing an integrated speech acquisition program to be guided by both speech and language clinicians and behavior analysts. Outcomes will instruct practices that can be utilized by classroom teachers across a student's school day. Workshop content has obtained credibility, as demonstrated by the involvement of the broader practice, education, and science communities in studying or applying the findings, procedures, practices, or theoretical concepts.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) Describe vocal skills that are preliminary and prerequisite to functional speech; (2) Describe a method to assess existing vocal (speech) repertoires; (3)Describe how to analyze assessment information for appropriate speech target selection; (4) Explain which speech targets to prioritize sequentially and why; (5)List at leasttwo behavioral treatments to increase vocalizations.
Activities: Workshop activities will include: Lecture, video observation, practice, targeted reading/handouts
Audience: Intermediate. Speech pathologists, behavior analysts, classroom teachers, program directors, clinicians, and anyone responsible for helping individuals acquire functional speech skills
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): articulation, speech, vocal training, vocal-verbal behavior
 
Workshop #W49
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Successful Inclusion Practices for Children With Autism Spectrum Disorder
Friday, May 26, 2017
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
Hyatt Regency, Mineral Hall D
Area: AUT/EDC; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Sonja R. de Boer, Ph.D.
SONJA R. DE BOER (Woodbury Autism Education and Research)
Description: While, more and more children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) are being included in the general education classroom, there is little evidence of a concerted effort being made to provide the training that is necessary to ensure the success of all students and to ease the stress of the inclusion process. Many children with ASD are not reaching the level of success to which they are capable, due to the lack of preparation and ongoing coaching of the professionals responsible for their education. This presenter/author will discuss the key components contributing to the success of inclusion of children with ASD and the instructional and behavioral methods which must be considered and utilized with children with ASD within the general education environment. This training is taken from this presenters book Successful Inclusion for Students with Autism: Creating a Complete, Effective ASD Inclusion Program. The strategies provided are to be utilized prior to, during and after placing a child with autism into the general education classroom. All strategies and techniques are ABA-based and include many checklists, data sheets, forms and special handouts to use immediately upon return to your school.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1)describe the key components contributing to the success of an inclusion program;(2) utilize specific forms and checklists to ensure appropriate implementation of specific inclusion program components and implementation of strategies;(3) utilize specific data collection and evaluation methods for analyzing a student's progress and the effectiveness of instructional and behavioral methods being utilized with the student;(4) utilize a specific annual evaluation tool to analyze the effectiveness of an inclusion program.
Activities: Each participant will receive a booklet of checklists, forms, data collection sheets, and specific handouts to use throughout the inclusion process. The workshop format is centered around the use of these tools to guide professionals through the inclusion process, thus workshop objectives will be met through lecture, discussion, guided practice with forms, checklists and data collection tools through video observation, as well as video demonstrations of specific strategies.
Audience: Educational Professionals (Inclusion Facilitators, Behavior Specialists, Special Education Teachers) and Behavior Analysts (BCaBA, BCBA) working with students with autism in both special education and general education school environments.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W50
CE Offered: BACB
Putting the Fun Back Into Functional Assessment and Analyses: A Functional Assessment KIT (Knowledge, Information, Technology)
Friday, May 26, 2017
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
Hyatt Regency, Capitol Ballroom 5
Area: AUT/DDA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Andrew John Houvouras, M.A.
ANDREW JOHN HOUVOURAS (Brevard Public Schools)
Description: While many behavior analysts are taught basics of conducting functional assessments and functional analyses, there are few economically and practically viable ways to efficaciously organize the considerable information collected throughout the assessment process. Consistent with the gold standards in the filed of ABA on the identification of variables impacting problem behavior, the presenter and colleagues have developed the Functional Assessment KIT, a free MS Excel based tool, to help behavior analysts consolidate assessment information. The Functional Assessment KIT incorporates preliminary and advanced tools of both descriptive and functional analyses to offer behavior analysts an efficacious way to conduct assessments, develop treatments and identify treatment progress and treatment integrity. Computers with MS Excel are necessary for this workshop.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) complete open-ended, structured interview tools; (2) describe recent research on synthesized analyses and how it differs from completed functional analyses; (3) construct and complete histograms in MS Excel; (4) enter and analyze data in a reversal graph in MS Excel.
Activities: The workshop will move quickly between lecture, discussion, small group and individual practice of the various computerized assessment tools. Various examples and sample data will be provided for participants to enter and analyze data based upon changes in graphic displays.
Audience: The targeted audience are intermediate behavior analysts.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W51
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Evolving More Nurturing Societies Through Behavioral Science
Friday, May 26, 2017
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
Hyatt Regency, Mineral Hall G
Area: CSS; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Anthony Biglan, Ph.D.
ANTHONY BIGLAN (Oregon Research Institute)
Description: This workshop is designed to assist behavior analysts in using their skills and knowledge to bring about significant improvements in the prevalence of wellbeing. The workshop will explain the public health framework and the ways it relates to behavior analysts' aspirations to improve society's wellbeing. I will provide a precise definition of wellbeing within that framework. I will provide an overview of prevention and treatment interventions developed and tested over the preceding 40 years and the contextualist principles underlying the success of these interventions. I will show how the same contextualist principles are relevant to understanding how the larger social system of corporate capitalism affects wellbeing and how and why it has evolved in a problematic direction in recent years. I will describe successful efforts to change practices at the corporate level. I will then assist participants in identifying specific outcomes they would like to work toward and will help small groups plan specific steps toward their goals. I will provide ample opportunity for participants to interact and ask questions.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to:(1) Describe at least five evidence-based family interventions; (2)Describe at least five evidence-based school interventions; (3)Describe four principles that characterize nurturing environments; (4)Describe the recent evolution of corporate capitalism and its impact on human wellbeing;(5) State at least one specific goal for improving human wellbeing that they plan to pursue; (6)Describe a plan for pursuing their goals.
Activities: Workshop activities will include lectures, discussion, small group discussion and planning, and presentations of the small groups to the entire workshop.
Audience: The target audience for this workshop includes professionals, specifically, behavior analysts, healthcare providers, teachers, school administrators, and family therapists
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W52
CE Offered: PSY/BACB — 
Ethics
Promoting Effective Behavioral Sexual Education and Instruction for Individuals With Developmental Disabilities and Autism Spectrum Disorder
Friday, May 26, 2017
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
Hyatt Regency, Centennial Ballroom H
Area: DDA/AUT; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Frank R. Cicero, Ph.D.
FRANK R. CICERO (Seton Hall University), SORAH STEIN (Partnership for Behavior Change)
Description: Sexuality is a topic that is difficult, or at least uncomfortable, for many professionals and parents to discuss, however it is a topic thatneeds to be addressed for the many individuals with developmental disabilities and ASD. Issues vary from individual to individual but may include social skills deficits impacting romantic relationships and interpersonal sexual relations, deficits in independence as related to personal hygiene, issues with masturbation, inappropriate sexual behaviors in public, sexual advances towards inappropriate people and issues with perspective taking to name a few. Applied behavior analytic treatments can be highly effective in promoting appropriate sexual behaviors and sexual expression in adolescents and adults. This workshop will focus on behaviorally-based strategies useful for individuals with developmental disabilities including individuals on all ends of the autism spectrum. This talk will begin with an overview of general issues regarding sexuality development as it relates to individuals with developmental disabilities. We will address the understanding of problem sexual behavior through functional assessment methods and discuss replacement treatment options based on function. We will discuss topics such as sexual development, sexuality knowledge, sexual behaviors both appropriate and inappropriate, issues regarding consent and common parent concerns. We will then move into more specific topics which could be included within a behaviorally-based sexual education curriculum designed for individuals with developmental disabilities and ASD. Treatment strategies discussed will include, but are not limited to, reinforcement-based procedures, video modeling, task analysis schedules, picture activity schedules, scripts and script fading, and social stories. Empirically supported literature and data will be presented where applicable and available. Although sexuality is an issue that often comes to the forefront in adolescence or early adulthood, information on sexuality is important for individuals of all ages. Topics related to ethical and legal decision making will also be discussed. Audience questions and discussion will be welcomed.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) state at least 3 common issues experienced by people with developmental disabilities and ASD as they relate to appropriate and satisfying sexual development and expression; (2) develop several teaching programs for skill acquisition of at least 3 sexual behaviors using techniques and theories consistent with applied behavior analysis; (3) conduct a functional assessment of problem behavior as it relates to sexual expression and develop a behavior intervention plan based on the function; (4) identify issues associated with consent.
Activities: The workshop will consist of the following activities: Didactic instruction from the presenter; Group discussion; Presentation and review of teaching materials; Role play and practice of presented teaching procedures.
Audience: The current workshop content is geared towards the following audience: (1)Experienced behavior analysts who have a desire to learn how to apply behavioral principles and teaching methods to the subject of sexual behavior; (2)Educators and related service professionals who have a behavioral background and work with children with developmental issues that have needs in the area of sexuality; (3)Although not specifically geared towards parents and family members of individuals with needs, parents would be welcomed to attend.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): autism, health, sex education, sexual
 
Workshop #W53
CE Offered: PSY/BACB — 
Ethics
Special Education Law and the Practicing Behavior Analyst: Legal and Ethical Considerations
Friday, May 26, 2017
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
Hyatt Regency, Centennial Ballroom G
Area: EDC/PRA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Melissa L. Olive, Ph.D.
MELISSA L. OLIVE (Applied Behavioral Strategies LLC)
Description: This workshop will focus on the Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act (IDEIA, a US Law) and the issues that practicing behavior analyst should be apprised of. Participants will learn about federal requirements for conducting functional behavioral assessments, writing behavior intervention plans, understanding the term positive behavior supports as used in the IDEIA, and the requirements for independent educational evaluations including FBAs. Information will be provided in lecture format with case studies as examples. The legal and ethical responsibilities of a behavior analyst will be discussed. Time will be allotted for extensive question and answer. Detailed handouts will be provided.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) Identify the major components of the IDEIA; (2) Identify the areas of IDEIA that impact the practicing behavior analyst; (3) Identify the types of disabilities that behavior analysts may serve under IDEIA; (4) Identify the legal requirements of an Independent Educational Evaluation; (5) Identify when an FBA must be completed under the IDEIA; (6) Identify when a BIP must be developed under the IDEIA; (7) Identify how often data must be collected under the IDEIA; (8) Describe how the 2016 Professional and Ethical Compliance Code relates to SPED Law.
Activities: Lecture, Discussion, Case Study, Question and Answer
Audience: Practicing Behavior Analysts; Supervisors of Practicing Behavior Analysts; School Administrators
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Education, Ethics, School Services, SPED Law
 
Workshop #W54
CE Offered: PSY/BACB — 
Supervision
Part Two: Effective Supervisors Do What It Takes! Improving Staff and Organizational Performance to Achieve Desired Client Outcomes
Friday, May 26, 2017
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
Hyatt Regency, Quartz B
Area: OBM/AUT; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Guy S. Bruce, Ed.D.
GUY S. BRUCE (Appealing Solutions, LLC)
Description: Do you work as an employee, supervisor, or director of an agency that provides services to clients with learning difficulties? Are you satisfied with your clients' progress? Behavior analysis developed a powerful technology for helping people, but too many clients don't receive the benefits. Why not? The easy answer is that employees don't do what they are told. But the employees' performance, just like their clients' performance, is a product of their environment. Do employees have the resources, training, and management necessary to help their clients achieve their goals? What about their supervisors? What about their directors? Organizations are groups of individuals who must work together to provide their clients with the outcomes they want. The failure of clients to make adequate progress is not usually an individual employee performance problem, but a performance problem at the system process, and individual levels of the organization. This workshop will provide participants with a set of tools to pinpoint organizational performance problems, analyze their causes, recommend the best solutions, solve the problems by designing and implementing solutions that might include more efficient resources, training, and management practices, and evaluate their effectiveness, efficiency, and return on investment. Please note: This workshop takes place in three parts; attendees must complete allthree parts to receive continuing education credits.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will be able to: (1) define desired client results and necessary performance, then measure and evaluate current client results and performance, including measures of client progress called "celeration efficiency;" (2) define desired staff performance at the system, process, and individual levels; measure and evaluate current staff performance at each level; (3) perform a data-based analysis of staff performance problems to identify their causes; (4) recommend solutions to performance problems with the best return on investment; (5) design and implement those solutions, which may include staff resources, training and management; (6) evaluate the effectiveness, efficiency, and return on investment of those solutions.
Activities: This workshop provides a variety of training aids including case studies, practice cards, practice exercises, project worksheets, job aids, and computer-based charting software.
Audience: This three-part workshop is for supervisors, staff trainers, program designers, and directors of schools and agencies serving people with learning difficulties. Attend this workshop to learn the skills needed to ensure that employees are effective in helping clients achieve their goals! Earn a total of 12 CEUs by completing all three parts. (You may use 3 of these to meet the new BACB requirement for supervisors.)
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W55
CE Offered: BACB — 
Supervision
CANCELED: Practicing Stimulus Equivalence Experiments With MTSLab Software
Friday, May 26, 2017
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
Hyatt Regency
Area: PCH/EAB; Domain: Basic Research
CE Instructor: Celso Socorro Oliveira, Ph.D.
CELSO SOCORRO OLIVEIRA (UNESP - Sao Paulo State University)
Description: MTSLab is a simple software that uses ASCII text files to design matching-to-sample (MTS) sessions. It was first developed by the presenter during his doctorate in 2002 to attend sign language teaching of mentally retarded deaf students of a Brazilian special school. This workshop proposes to prepare MTS sessions using this software considering the graph theory approach. The software will be freely distributed. The theoretical part of the workshop aims to introduce the concept of MTS as an operator in stimulus equivalent classes, which includes the concepts of nodes, arcs, trees, nodal distance, and strength of the relations. The practice will be conducted preparing sample sessions based on papers usually taught within stimulus equivalence experiments in behavior analysis journals. The sample stimuli used will be available through a website. At the end of the workshop, the audience should be able to prepare different sessions with the software and analyze its data to decide if the equivalence emerged or not.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) review concepts of stimulus equivalence and MTS; (2) prepare MTS sessions with MTSLab software; (3) evaluate data resulted of the practice and registered by the software.
Activities: Lecture of stimulus equivalence under graph theory approach and guided practice of sessions preparation using the software MTSLab.
Audience: Undergraduate professors; teachers of disabled people who want to use stimulus equivalence as a tool
Content Area: Theory
Instruction Level: Basic
Keyword(s): Graph Theory, matching, software, stimulus equivalence
 
 
Workshop #W56
CE Offered: BACB/PSY/QABA — 
Supervision
BACB-Compliant Multi-Media Supervisor Training
Friday, May 26, 2017
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
Hyatt Regency, Granite B
Area: PRA/TBA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Karen R. Wagner, Ph.D.
KAREN R. WAGNER (TheBehaviorAnalyst.com; Behavior Services of Brevard, Inc )
Description: Hundreds of BCBAs have participated in this mixed-media, BACB-Compliant Supervision Training workshop since 2013! This workshop prepares BCBAs to become BACB-approved supervisors, including new BCaBA supervision responsibilities. Offered as a six-hour live workshop with an additional 2 1/2 hours online through www.TheBehaviorAnalyst.com, participants receive almost 9 hours of content while using only 6 hours of conference time! Through live interaction, scenarios, and interesting video situations, participants will experience skill building, as well as effective documentation. Multiple populations and environments are represented, including child welfare, education and in-home. Additionally, participant-trios will participate in supervisory sessions with interesting ethical dilemmas as supervisors, supervisees, and fidelity observers. Because of varied experience, participants will be offered choices of clinical focus at key points in the live workshop. This helps keep all participants invested and engaged with the material. The online material, an additional 3 CEUs at no additional cost, includes a review of the workshop material, video scenarios, extensive coverage of the BACB Experience Standards, and opportunities to test understanding of the material. Note: This training program is based on the BACB Supervisor Training Curriculum Outline but is offered independent of the BACB. The additional online CE credits are not sponsored by ABAI.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) describe the purpose of supervision; (2) demonstrate how to deliver performance feedback; (3) describe their obligations regarding behavioral skills training; (4) discuss methods to evaluate the effects of supervision.
Activities: Participants will engage in: Didactic lecture, critiques of video supervision scenarios, and guided and directed discussions of professional and ethical responsibilities. Additionally, all participants will be divided into triads for multiple role play scenarios, taking turns as supervisor, supervisee and observer with each new scenario.
Audience: This workshop is for BCBAs who will be supervising pre-certification interns, BCaBAs, and Registered Behavior Technicians, as well as BCaBAs who will be supervising RBTs.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Ethics, Multi-Media, Supervisor, Supervisor Training
 
Workshop #W57
CE Offered: PSY/BACB — 
Supervision
Supervision Training for Supervisors of ABA Staff
Friday, May 26, 2017
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
Hyatt Regency, Mineral Hall A
Area: PRA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: William Tim Courtney, M.S.
WILLIAM TIM COURTNEY (Little Star Center), VINCENT LAMARCA (Little Star Center)
Description: This training content is designed to train supervisors and aspiring supervisors in evidence-based methods of supervising staff who provide applied behavior analysis (ABA) services for people with autism. The content is based on over four decades of ABA research on staff training and supervision as well as the authors’ hands-on experience. The content includes critical supervision knowledge and skills coinciding with the Behavior Analysis Certification Board (BACB©) task list for effective supervision. The content is relevant for supervisors of staff providing comprehensive and/or focused ABA services across a variety of settings, including center-based programs, homes, schools, and clinics. An additional 2 hours of supervision training will be available online to meet the 8 hour requirement of the BACB. Note: the online continuing education is not sponsored by ABAI.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) Identify and describe the purpose of supervision ; (2) Identify how to pinpoint the responsibilities of one’s supervisees; (3) Demonstrate how to assess the performance of supervisees; (4) Demonstrate how to establish, change, and maintain the behaviors of supervisees; (5) Demonstrate how to address behavior problems of supervisees.
Activities: Instructional strategies include: lecture, discussion, and small group breakouts
Audience: For BCBA practitioners who provide supervision to ABA staff (including Registered Behavior Technicians, paraprofessionals, teaching assistants, etc).
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W58
CE Offered: BACB/PSY/QABA — 
Supervision
Acceptance and Commitment Therapy for Behavior Analysts: Behavioral Flexibility Training Within Your Scope of Practice
Friday, May 26, 2017
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
Hyatt Regency, Centennial Ballroom E
Area: PRA/AUT; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Thomas G. Szabo, Ph.D.
THOMAS G. SZABO (Florida Institute of Technology), JONATHAN J. TARBOX (FirstSteps for Kids; University of Southern California ), EMILY KENNISON SANDOZ (University of Louisiana at Lafayette)
Description: Have you ever wondered how applied behavior analysts might respond to an individual's private events while staying within our scope of practice and maintaining the highest levels of scientific rigor? How to go about saving the world with behavior analysis? For example, how do you help a parent mediate ABA services when she feels ashamed and has difficulty focusing? Help client deal with bigoted behavior, traumatic events, sexual violence, or bullying? Do you have the professional skills to handle such conversations with compassion and caringly bring your client's focus under the control of relevant contingencies of reinforcement? Applied behavior analysts have developed potent, evidence-based technologies for igniting socially significant behavioral change in a variety of settings. This workshop brings to behavior analysts new tools with which to establish the need for, occasion, and reinforce responding that is sensitive to changes in the prevailing contingencies of reinforcement. We will examine the practical tools and basic science undergirding acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) and how you might be able to make use of ACT strategies in your practice, while staying close to the BACB Task List 4th edition and our scope of practice as outlined by Baer, Wolf, and Risley (1968).
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) Examine data from investigations on treating child and adult behavioral rigidity; (2) Engage in (or observe) experiential exercises designed to promote flexibility; (3) Discuss these exercises within the context of basic behavior analytic principles.
Activities: Activities will include - Lecture on basic research that led to this practice, including stimulus equivalence, relational framing, rule insensitivity, and delay discounting - Practical small- and large- group training on how to develop your own ACT procedures to help people spend less time struggling with private events and more time engaging in behavior that accomplishes - Group discussion pertaining to the focuses of ACT that are appropriate for behavior analysts versus those that are better left to those in psychotherapy and counseling fields Note: this workshop is not about treating psychological disorders. It is about helping behavior analysts address a fuller range of human behavior and, in doing so, help clients, clients' parents, and behavior analysts themselves, to be more effective in achieving their daily goals.
Audience: This workshop does not require previous training in basic principles of learning or ACT. It is geared to be an introductory level workshop that anyone can attend. However, there is a significant amount of new material here that will be of value to those that are well trained in conceptual, experimental, applied research, and practice domains of the science. Therefore, we strongly encourage intermediate and advanced learners to attend.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
Keyword(s): Behavioral flexibility, Delay Discounting, Relational Framing, Stimulus Equivalence
 
Workshop #W59
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
CANCELED: PORTL: Your Portable Skinner Box for Teaching Behavioral Principles
Friday, May 26, 2017
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
Hyatt Regency
Area: TBA/AUT; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Jesus Rosales-Ruiz, Ph.D.
JESUS ROSALES-RUIZ (University of North Texas), MARY ELIZABETH HUNTER (The Art and Science of Animal Training)
Description: Behavior analysts have long recognized the benefits of hands-on laboratory experience for teaching students about basic behavioral principles. Enormous learning takes place when students can practice observing and changing behavior in a controlled environment. However, laboratory experience is no longer part of the curriculum in many of today's behavior analytic programs. This workshop will introduce you to PORTL (the Portable Operant Research and Teaching Lab), a tabletop game that provides an inexpensive apparatus for students to see the principles of behavior in action and practice applying those principles to change behavior. It is essentially a portable Skinner box for humans. Through PORTL exercises, students can learn about reinforcement, extinction, discrimination, stimulus control, shaping, chaining, and other behavioral phenomena. Students also learn how to write teaching plans, assess the learner's progress during teaching, and revise their teaching plan as needed. In this workshop you will learn the fundamentals of PORTL, the parallels between PORTL and the Skinner box, and the basics of using PORTL in the classroom or as a teaching tool for therapists. You will also get to play several PORTL exercises as both the teacher and learner, which will further illustrate the power of PORTL as a teaching tool.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) Describe the basic components of the game PORTL and the relationship between PORTL and the Skinner box; (2) Describe how to use PORTL to teach basic behavioral principles to students or practitioners; (3) Teach simple and complex behaviors using PORTL.
Activities: This workshop will consist of lectures and hands-on activities. Lectures and videos will be used to describe the basics of PORTL and teach participants how to use PORTL to teach others about basic behavioral principles. Participants will have a chance to experience PORTL through a series of hands-on exercises. During the exercises, participants will play the roles of both teacher and student. Group discussions will be used to summarize and reflect on the experience gained by playing the exercises and to further discuss how to use PORTL as a teaching tool.
Audience: This workshop is designed for anyone who is interested in teaching others about basic behavioral principles and who is interested in teaching others about how to design and implement teaching programs. University professors will find the material useful for their undergraduate and graduate behavior classes. BCBAs and licensed psychologists will find the material useful for training practitioners and therapists.
Content Area: Methodology
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): basic principles, laboratory experience, shaping skills, undergraduate teaching
 
 
Workshop #W60
CE Offered: PSY/BACB — 
Supervision
Getting the Most out of Supervision: Using Behavioral Techniques to Enhance Supervision
Friday, May 26, 2017
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
Hyatt Regency, Mineral Hall F
Area: TBA/OBM; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Alyssa N. Wilson, Ph.D.
ALYSSA N. WILSON (Saint Louis University), HEATHER LYNN LEWIS (Saint Louis University)
Description: Behavior analytic research on supervision has identified the effectiveness of using behavioral applications (e.g., behavioral skills training) to teach competent trainees. Supervisors, however, may need additional assistance with identifying and implementing evidence-based practices when it comes to effective and competency-based supervision. Therefore, the current experiential workshop seeks to assist supervisors who a) work with multiple trainee's, and b) are looking to expand their supervision repertoire to enhance their supervision practice. The workshop will highlight (1) supervisor-trainee relationship during and after supervisory period, (2) delivering competency-based supervision, (3) successful tips for managing independent and group supervision, (4) organization strategies (e.g., evaluation rubrics, mapping clinical projects, goal setting, etc.), and (5) shaping professional behavior. Attendees will be provided supplemental materials during the workshop, to practice the skills presented. The workshop will use in-vivo training paired with problem-based learning paradigms to assist attendees with acquiring skills discussed during the workshop.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) List important features and elements of supervision; (2)Determine best-practices for supervision; (3)List aspects of appropriate supervisor-trainee relationship throughout various phases of supervision; (4)Demonstrate competency-based supervision skills; (5)Demonstrate skills for conducting individual and group supervision; (6)Design and implement organization strategies; (7)Demonstrate skills to shape professional behaviors.
Activities: The workshop will use lecture, video, discussion, and modeling, rehearsal, and feedback to assist trainees with achieving the learning objectives. Problem-based learning (e.g., small groups work through a supervision issue/problem) will be used to assist attendees with applying the discussed skills. In-vivo and video demonstrations of strategies will be conducted in conjunction with group discussions and role-play to ensure attendee skill acquisition. Supplemental materials will be provided to support attendee learning during the workshop. Attendees will also be able to use the supplemental materials after the workshop, as an example/guide for the supervision process.
Audience: The nature of the workshop will be geared towards behavior analysts who have had minimal supervision experience. The content of the workshop will be focused on more intermediate and advanced topics often faced by supervisors, while attendees with little or advanced knowledge and/or experience with supervision will also be challenged to think outside of the box when it comes to delivering effective supervision.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
Keyword(s): Behavior Analysis, Organizational-behavior management, Supervision
 
Workshop #W61
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Verbal Behavior Development Protocols: The Foundations of Language Development From Imitation to Naming
Friday, May 26, 2017
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
Hyatt Regency, Quartz
Area: VRB/DDA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Susan Buttigieg, Ph.D.
SUSAN BUTTIGIEG (Teachers College, Columbia University; Manhattanville College), LIN DU (Teachers College, Columbia University), BIANCA VASSARE (Columbia University, Teachers College)
Description: This workshop will teach attendees about five different verbal behavior developmental cusps (generalized imitation, listener literacy, auditory matching, observational learning, naming) necessary to access a variety of contingencies in school and in life. The instructors will present assessment and intervention procedures (Greer & Ross, 2008; Greer & Speckman, 2009), sources of reinforcement, and appropriate candidates for these interventions. Skill and next steps once the cusps/capabilities are acquired will be discussed.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will be able to: (1) detail vocally how to probe for and induce five cusps/capabilities; (2) role play and run errorless instruction (probe and intervention); (3) list the change in the source of reinforcement once each cusp is induced; (4) describe a candidate for each intervention; (5) describe how they can teach the child differently once each cusp is induced.
Activities: Workshop objectives will be met through a balanced presentation of lecture, guided practice, video observation, and group discussion. Core content will be taught through lecture and video demonstrations of strategies will be provided. Supplemental materials will be provided in order to support participant learning.
Audience: The target audience for this workshop includes BACB certificants and licensed psychologists, behavior analysts, (BCaBAs, BCBAs, BCBA-Ds), speech therapists, supervisors, or paraprofessionals who are working with children with and without disabilities. Please note, participants should be well-versed in the vocabulary of the science of behavior, including basic verbal operants, probes, and trials.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): CABAS(R), Protocol interventions, VB development
 
Special Event #1
CE Offered: BACB
Closed Meeting: Affiliated Chapter Leadership Training
Friday, May 26, 2017
2:00 PM–5:00 PM
Hyatt Regency, Capitol Ballroom 1-3
Chair: Steven Woolf (Beacon ABA Services)
ABAI is pleased to offer a Leadership Training Session for officers of ABAI affiliated chapters for the purpose of providing strategies for guiding the growth of chapters and providing services to members and constituents. Although this training is free for up to three officers per chapter, advanced registration is required and attendance is by invitation only.
 
 
Special Event #2
Closed Meeting: Special Interest Group Leadership Training
Friday, May 26, 2017
3:00 PM–6:00 PM
Hyatt Regency, Capitol Ballroom 4
Chair: M. Jackson Marr (Georgia Tech)
ABAI is pleased to offer a Leadership Training Session for officers of ABAI Special Interest Groups (SIGs) for the purpose of providing strategies for guiding the growth of SIGs and providing services to members and constituents. This training is for SIG leaders only. Although the SIG training is free for up to three officers per SIG, registration is required. This event is closed; attendance is by invitation only.
 
 
Workshop #W62
CE Offered: PSY/BACB — 
Ethics
Science at the Animal Shelter: Research Designs, Ethics, and Effective Collaborations With Animal Professionals
Friday, May 26, 2017
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Hyatt Regency, Centennial Ballroom A
Area: AAB/CSS; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Erica N. Feuerbacher, Ph.D.
ALEXANDRA PROTOPOPOVA (Texas Tech University), ERICA N. FEUERBACHER (Carroll College), SHERRY WOODARD (Best Friends)
Description: Through the combined expertise of a nationally-renown animal shelter behavior director, applied animal behavior analysts, and university animal researchers, participants will learn how behavioral research is conducted at animal shelters. Topics of discussion will include (1) effective and humane research designs, (2) ethical considerations of working with shelter animals, and (3) establishing a working relationship with animal shelter professionals. The workshop will include presentations from various professionals, a brainstorming session in which participants will develop a plan of action for approaching an animal shelter and developing an effective and ethical research design. Content has obtained credibility, as demonstrated by the involvement of the broader practice, education, and science communities in studying or applying the findings, procedures, practices, or theoretical concepts. Content is related to ethical, legal, statutory, or regulatory policies, guidelines, and standards.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to:(1) describe research methods that are appropriate for animal shelters; (2)list the potential ethical concerns with various research designs and provide solutions to these concerns; (3)describe the ethical concerns of conducting research with shelter animals from the animal, shelter volunteer, shelter staff, and community perspectives; (4)describe how to effectively communicate with other animal professionals; (5)develop a plan of action to conduct research at the participant's local animal shelter that includes initial contact, follow-up, and effective communication with all relevant member of the community.
Activities: Workshop objectives will be achieved through lecture, discussion, role-playing, and small-group activities.
Audience: Participants should be interested in learning how to effectively conduct research at animal shelters. Participants may be behavior analysts (no specific boar certification required), students in animal behavior, and animal professionals and enthusiasts.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
Keyword(s): Animal Shelter, Collaborations, Ethics, Research Design
 
Workshop #W63
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Ecological Assessment: The Missing Link in Successful Inclusion
Friday, May 26, 2017
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Hyatt Regency, Centennial Ballroom E
Area: AUT/EDC; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Tyler Fovel, M.A.
TYLER FOVEL (Strategic Alternatives)
Description: Educational programs based on Applied Behavior Analysis are known for their ability to successfully structure individualized educational environments for students with a wide variety of learning difficulties. Yet, as these and other students enter school inclusion environments, carefully administered corresponding structures may be largely absent, leading to reduced or stalled progress. This presentation will assert that lack of necessary structure in complex environments like regular classrooms stems, in part, from a failure to formally analyze the skills required and the natural contingencies in place. Student success requires matching a student's abilities with appropriate settings, preparing them to exhibit the skills necessary in the target environment, and providing support protocols to nurture and grow engagement. Ecological assessment of school-based inclusion environments is a crucial process that leads to data that is fundamental to planning and effecting the successful incorporation of students into typical settings. In contrast to assessment processes like functional assessment, relatively little commonly recognized structure currently exists for ecological assessment. The workshop will review ecological assessment literature and present a comprehensive, structured protocol of specific data-based methodologies to conduct an ecological assessment in school-based target settings which includes data collection methodology, a structured interview, summary procedures, and visualization/reporting of results.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) Describe the recommendations of published literature concerning the ecological assessment process; (2) Describe and follow a structured process for the observation and collection of data related to defined classroom-based behaviors of students and teachers; (3) Summarize data collection to answer specific questions about the target environment using a supplied form; (4) Follow a structured interview form to gather information on school-based target environments; (5) Display the results of the data-gathering process on a visual display supplied in the presentation; (6)F ollow a recommended format to create a written ecological assessment report based on the supplied protocol.
Activities: Core principles will be presented and discussed with clinical examples and sample assessment products. Students will complete a practice assessment with materials provided in a small group.
Audience: Material is suitable for practitioners responsible for assessment and planning instruction for school-age students in school settings.
Content Area: Methodology
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Classroom Assessment, Ecological Assessment, School Inclusion
 
Workshop #W64
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
From the Classroom to the Workforce: Teaching Vocational Skills to Individuals With an Autism Spectrum Disorder
Friday, May 26, 2017
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Hyatt Regency, Centennial Ballroom B
Area: AUT/EDC; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Julie S. Weiss, M.Ed.
JULIE S. WEISS (New England Center for Children), JULIENNE FAIRCHILD LEBLANC (New England Center for Children)
Description: Developing a successful vocational program for individuals with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a process that begins in elementary school and continues through high school. Teaching functional skills is essential for successful career planning. In this workshop, we will review current methods to determine learner's job preferences and strengths. Secondly, we will review the importance of both work and social skills in establishing a career plan and goals. School-based vocational training includes teaching appropriate work habits, developing positive attitudes toward employment, and learning basic vocational tasks. Evidence-based instruction, including discrete trial teaching, task analysis, and incidental learning, are essential for acquisition. For an individual with an ASD, vocational academic activities aimed at increasing career awareness and employment preparation are essential. In this workshop, we will describe the components of career education and school-based vocational training in an ABA program for children with an ASD. Examples of vocational training, including curriculum development, successful job matches, means for developing opportunities for children to sample potential work options, and long-term development of career goals, will be reviewed. Case examples of children with an ASD engaged in vocational activities will be presented.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) describe the components of school-based vocational training for children with an ASD; (2) describe steps for determining strengths and preference for job skills for children with an ASD; (3) describe steps of the career planning model for children with an ASD; (4) develop a vocational programming plan for a learner with an ASD.
Activities: Workshop objectives will be met through a variety of formats: lecture, videos, examples, case studies, guided practice and group discussion. Videos demonstrations of procedures will be used.
Audience: This workshop is targeted for BCBAs and educators working with children and adolescents with ASD with a focus on work readiness and teaching skills to improve employment outcomes.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W65
CE Offered: BACB/PSY/QABA
CANCELED: An Interactive Visual Schedule: Establishing Social Initiation and Flexible Play
Friday, May 26, 2017
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Hyatt Regency
Area: AUT; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Paulo Guilhardi, Ph.D.
ASHLEY DOUGLAS (Beacon ABA Services Inc.), JENNIFER SMITH (Beacon ABA Services Inc.), PAULO GUILHARDI (Beacon ABA Services Inc.)
Description: Deficits in social initiation and appropriate play are defining characteristics of an Autism Spectrum Disorder diagnosis. Traditional play schedules have focused on increasing appropriate play by linking task completion activities together using visual supports. These play activity schedules, while effective at promoting appropriate play, do not teach the child to request others to play with him or involve the child in the social routines happening in his environment. The current workshop will focus on a new approach to the traditional visual play schedule that requires the child to: request a partner to play with him, engage in a variety of play activities both independent and social in nature, and demonstrate flexibility in his ability to follow the schedule given a variety of activities based on those that are available in his current environment and listed in varied orders. This protocol is taught using a combination of video modeling and graduated guidance.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) describe the deficits in children with ASD to rationalize a need for teaching visually; (2) customize an interactive visual schedule program for their client's level and needs; (3) implement the steps of the interactive visual schedule protocol using faded video modeling and graduated guidance; (4) identify the steps of the protocol as they are being performed and collect accurate data on client performance.
Activities: Workshop objectives will be met through a combination of lecture, small group instruction, guided practice, and video observation.
Audience: Certified behavior analysts, graduate students, ABA practitioners
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): flexible routines, social initiations, video modeling, visual schedule
 
 
Workshop #W66
CE Offered: BACB/PSY/QABA
My BCBA is Amazing!
Friday, May 26, 2017
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Hyatt Regency, Centennial Ballroom C
Area: AUT/PRA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Colleen DeMello, M.A.
COLLEEN DEMELLO (Applied Behavioral Strategies), LAURA BUNDA (Applied Behavioral Strategies)
Description: Behavior analysts are faced with many environmental variables that either directly or indirectly influence efficacy of treatment when working with families in a home setting. Awareness of these variables is essential in developing solid working relationships with families and developing strategies that will produce maximum results.This workshop is designed to teach Behavior Analysts how to take a functional approach to working with parents in the home and demonstrate the ability to train parents how to become an effective agent of change with their children.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) Identify variables that influence successful in-home ABA intervention; (2) Explain customer service as it relates to ABA; (3) Demonstrate how to effectively set expectations with parents/caregivers; (4) Develop goals and objectives that meet family's and child's needs; (5) Demonstrate how to effectively train parents to be an agent of change.
Activities: Lecture, Discussion, Case studies, Question & Answer, Small Group Breakout
Audience: BCaBAs, BCBAs, Supervisors of BCBAs, Teachers
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W67
CE Offered: BACB/PSY/QABA
Solving the Receptive Language Puzzle: Pushing the Boundaries of Research and Practice
Friday, May 26, 2017
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Hyatt Regency, Centennial Ballroom F
Area: AUT/PRA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Vincent LaMarca, M.A.
VINCENT LAMARCA (Little Star Center)
Description: Initial difficulty with receptive language is common for some children with autism (Carp 2012). A number of strategies have been tested over the years (Chestnut, 2003; Pelios,2004) and general guidelines for teaching receptive language have been published (Grow, 2013). But what to do when all else fails? This workshop will review 22 current treatment procedures that have been effective for some children with autism. Treatment procedures were identified through a literature review of receptive language research as well as case study examples. Research data, clinical data, and video examples of how to implement different strategies will be presented. The workshop will also identify other potential formats and additional steps that may help some children who would not otherwise gain receptive language skills.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) identify 22 different teaching procedures that can be used with receptive language; (2) categorize different teaching procedures in a manner that allows for systematic review of which procedure to implement; (3) identify different client profiles that may make one strategy more effective than another; (4) create modifications to different strategies that remain grounded in research.
Activities: Workshop objectives will be met through a balanced presentation of lecture, video observation, active student responding, and group discussion.
Audience: Behavior analysts who have previous experience working with individuals diagnosed with autism or developmental disability and who have implemented behaviorally based procedures to teach receptive language, 2016 FABA conference attendees who wanted more than my 1-hour presentation could offer, and curious individuals who typically hold strong views they like to post on social media.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): listener responding, receptive labeling, receptive language
 
Workshop #W68
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Very Young Infants Show Symptoms of Autism and Demonstrate Good Response to Intervention
Friday, May 26, 2017
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Hyatt Regency, Centennial Ballroom G
Area: AUT/PRA; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Glen O. Sallows, Ph.D.
TAMLYNN DIANNE GRAUPNER (Wisconsin Early Autism Project), GLEN O. SALLOWS (Wisconsin Early Autism Project)
Description: Forty-nine infant siblings of children with autism, and 14 typically developing infants, were observed daily. Twelve infant siblings developed symptoms of autism (24.5%) before 8 months of age, similar to earlier findings (Brian, 2014; Ozonoff, 2011). Symptom onset was first observed at 2.1 weeks of age, including loss of eye contact, loss of facial expression and affect, motor mannerisms, and unusual reactivity to normal social presses, thought to reflect aberrant brain processes (Brian, 2014; Jones & Klin, 2013; Landa, 2012). Since the brain changes in response to new experiences, and begins to function more normally through related neural growth, it may be possible to reverse early symptoms (Helt, 2008; Just, 2009; Xu, 2009; Rogers, 2008). Using ESDM, ABA or other strategies (Als, 2004), studies have found improvement in at-risk children at 18 mos. (MacDonald, 2014; Rogers, 2010) and under 12 months (Rogers, 2014). We describe symptom onset with accompanying declines in cognitive, language, motor and adaptive domains. With immediate intervention, symptoms resolved as they arose, perhaps indicating that intervention prior to one year of age may result in fewer children being diagnosed. This content has been studied according to established procedures for scientific scrutiny that can be reasonably relied upon.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) Identify behaviors during the first year of life that are related to later ASD diagnosis; (2) Describe strategies for ameliorating ASD symptoms during infancy; (3) Develop strategies for helping parents to restructure interactions with their infant.
Activities: Video training and comparison of infants to determine the presence of symptoms. Presentation of data regarding symptom onset and progress during intervention. Lecture and video describing intervention procedures. Lecture and video describing data gathering and test performance using Bayley III, Mullen, PLS-5 and Vineland II.
Audience: Intermediate and advanced
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): "autism", "infant siblings", "intervention", "symptom onset"
 
Workshop #W69
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
CANCELED: Improving Protocols to Overcome Error Patterns While Teaching Conditional Discriminations and Receptive Identification to Children With Autism
Friday, May 26, 2017
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Hyatt Regency
Area: AUT/DDA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Smita Awasthi, M.S.
SRIDHAR ARAVAMUDHAN (Behavior Momentum India), SMITA AWASTHI (Behavior Momentum India)
Description: Stimulus overselectivity (Lovaas, Koegal & Schreibman,1971) , weak behavior consequence relations (Fisher, Pawich, Dickes, Paden & Toussaint, 2014), a history of responding with errors, problems with pre-requisite skills such as attending and scanning (Kodak, Clements et al., 2015), inadequate staff training and a number of other factors are routinely known to interfere with acquisition of conditional discriminations required to demonstrate listener responding skills (receptive language) to competence by children with autism. Even when parents and professionals are convinced that the child knows, a thorough assessment eliminating position and instruction sequence biases would reveal that the discrimination may not have really been acquired. This workshop will address evidence based practices to improve receptive language training.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to:(1) Run assessments to identify errors in responding and ascertain if discriminated responding has been truly achieved; (2) Identify types of errors in responding as they occur during teaching trials; (3)Tailor teaching protocols to minimize error patterns; (4)Use a variety of within stimulus prompts, stimulus salience and response prompts; (5)Identify common errors made by instructors during teaching trials; (6)Staff training to overcome instructor errors; (7)Training to Improve the salience of behavior consequence relations to accelerate acquisition of discriminated responding.
Activities: Workshop objectives will be met through lecture, video presentations, demonstration videos and structured small group exercises.
Audience: BCBAs and BCaBAs with less than 3 years of clinical experience and Behavior Technicians
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
 
Workshop #W70
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Conducting Functional Analyses in Applied Settings
Friday, May 26, 2017
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Hyatt Regency, Centennial Ballroom H
Area: AUT/PRA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Meghan Van Nostrand, M.S.
STEPHANIE PHELAN (ABACS; Simmons College), Ashley Williams (ABACS; Simmons College), MEGHAN VAN NOSTRAND (ABACS; Simmons College), BRANDON HERSCOVITCH (ABACS)
Description: Functional analysis (FA) is a powerful tool for the assessment of challenging behavior in students with autism and other disabilities. FAs systematically manipulate the antecedents and consequences of target behavior so as to experimentally determine the function(s) of that behavior. The literature indicates that treatments based on the results of functional analyses are more effective than treatments based on other assessment methodologies. However, FAs may not be conducted regularly in home- or school-based settings. Several reasons have been cited for this, including the lack of resources typically needed to conduct these analyses. Given that functional analysis is the only experimental methodology available to determine the function of behavior, and that function-based interventions have been demonstrated to more effective, it is important to extend this methodology to applied settings. The current workshop is designed to prepare practitioners to develop and implement FAs in their current setting, within the scope of time and resources typically available for home-based services. Participants will work through the entire assessment process, from identification of procedures, steps to take, analysis of data, and selection of function-based intervention.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will be able to: (1) articulate in writing the importance of conducting functional analyses in applied settings; (2) articulate in writing the steps to preparing for a functional analysis in an applied setting (including selecting an experimental design, procedures, measurement methods, and methods for collecting and evaluating interobserver agreement and procedural integrity data); (3) articulate in writing what resources should be taken into account when planning to conduct a functional analysis in an applied setting and analyze how to work within the constraints of the available resources; (4) articulate in writing his or her evaluation of functional analysis outcomes; (5) match function-based treatments with the functional analysis outcomes; (6) articulate in writing a variety of issues that occur while planning for and conducting functional analyses and will articulate in writing how to respond to such issues.
Activities: Instructional strategies include: lecture, group-discussion, and targeted case studies. Workshop objectives will be met through a balanced presentation of lecture, group discussion, and guided practice. Core content will be taught through lecture, video, and a guided discussion of case studies to be presented. (Supplemental materials for identifying language and learning barriers will be provided in order to support participant learning). The format combines lecture, video, group discussion, and guided practice.
Audience: Behavior Analysts with background knowledge of functional analysis research, seeking to expand their repertoire in implementing functional analyses in applied settings.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Applied Settings, Functional Analysis, Functional Assessment
 
Workshop #W71
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Behavioral Strategies to Ensure Caregivers of Children and Adults With a Diagnosis of Autism Implement Effective Language-Based Teaching Interventions During Daily Activities
Friday, May 26, 2017
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Hyatt Regency, Mineral Hall A
Area: AUT/DDA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: James W. Partington, Ph.D.
JAMES W. PARTINGTON (Partington Behavior Analysts)
Description: This workshop is designed for consultants and program administrators who wish to further develop their skills in developing and implementing comprehensive intervention programs. In order to facilitate the rapid acquisition of critical language, social, and functional skills, it is important that both the selection of specific learning objectives and the teaching activities be prioritized. Data regarding the development of neurotypical children will be presented to demonstrate the typical patterns of skill development across a wide range of repertoires. It is critical that a learner's skills be maintained by naturally-occurring reinforcement contingencies that are associated with the use of those skills in common daily activities. However, many instructional programs for individuals with a diagnosis of autism fail to devote sufficient instructional time to the development of those skills that will result in the greatest overall rate of skill acquisition. Therefore, it is important that parents, educators and other caregivers be able to identify teaching opportunities available in home, community, and school settings, and that they be able to successfully implement effective teaching and reinforcement strategies. In spite of receiving consultative services, many caregivers report finding it difficult to implement recommended teaching strategies. Techniques will be presented that facilitate caregivers' successful implementation of evidence-based teaching strategies with individuals at various levels of development in the home, and community settings.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1)Identify strategies for helping parents and educators prioritize the learning outcomes for both language skills and functional living skills based upon a learner's current set of skills; (2)Analyze programs for a nonverbal individual and select learning objectives that will help identify the skills necessary to develop instructional control and establish an initial verbal repertoire; (3)Analyze an instructional programs for individual who has acquired a set of basic mand, tact, and intraverbal skills and select learning objectives that will teach more advanced skills in these repertoires and incorporate the use of these skills into a variety of everyday social interactions; (4)Participants will be able to compare the existing skill levels of a young child with an autism spectrum disorder with the age-equivalent skills of typically developing children; (5)Identify methods to ensure caregivers come in contact with reinforcement for implementing intervention strategies designed to develop important functional life skills while participating in everyday household, community and classroom activities.
Activities: Workshop objectives will be met through a balanced presentation of lecture, video observation of implementation of teaching strategies, and group discussion. Core content will be taught through lecture and video demonstrations of strategies will be provided.
Audience: PhDs, BCBAs, and BCaBAs who are currently supervising or implementing behavioral teaching interventions with individuals with autism.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Autism, Natural environment, Parent intervention
 
Workshop #W72
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Human Sexuality and Relationship Training for Students and Autism in Applied Settings
Friday, May 26, 2017
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Hyatt Regency, Capitol Ballroom 5
Area: AUT/EDC; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Silva Orchanian, M.A.
SILVA ORCHANIAN (Melmark New England), KIMBERLY L. DUHANYAN (Melmark New England), FREDDIE SCIBELLI (Melmark New England)
Description: Sexual education is a standard component in public school curricula for middle and high school students. Teenagers with an autism spectrum disorders or acquired brain injuries are often excluded from human sexuality education for a variety of reasons. This workshop will focus on the importance of healthy human sexuality and relationship training for male and female students on the autism spectrum and with acquired brain injuries. Following a review of the literature on sexuality training, participants will review sample parental consent forms, baseline data collection and referral systems, and training protocols. The goal of the workshop will be to provide participants with resources to identify students in their settings for whom human sexuality training is needed as well as systems to ensure competent human sexuality and relationship instruction.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) identify the components of an effective human sexuality training curriculum including assessment and on-going treatment and consultation; (2) identify modifications and adaptations to sample materials as needed in their applied settings; (3) identify a variety of ethical considerations when designing and implementing a human sexuality curriculum; (4)identify solutions to barriers preventing them from delivering human sexuality training services in their settings; (5)identify pre-requisite skills needed for individual sexuality training and group training.
Activities: Lecture, discussion, small group, role plays, video and guided practice
Audience: Intermediate
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W73
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Treating Children With Psychiatric Disorders: The Impact of Learning History on Diagnosis and Treatment
Friday, May 26, 2017
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Hyatt Regency, Mineral Hall B
Area: CBM/DEV; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Jeannie A. Golden, Ph.D.
JEANNIE A. GOLDEN (East Carolina University)
Description: Typically, functional behavioral assessment (FBA) has been used with individuals with developmental disabilities, including autism spectrum disorders. The goal of FBA is to identify the function of aberrant behavior and to teach the individual to exhibit an acceptable replacement behavior that can serve the same function. Traditional counselors view aberrant behaviors in individuals with psychiatric disorders as symptoms of underlying constructs and use the diagnosis as a reason for these behaviors, proposing more global treatments such as evidence-based therapies or medications. On the other hand, behaviorists view those behaviors as serving an environmental function. Once the environmental function of a psychiatric symptom is identified, it can be treated effectively by replacing it with a more acceptable behavior serving the same function. However, there are several components that are often missing in the analysis of behavior that is related to psychiatric diagnoses. These include: 1) the analysis/understanding of establishing operations in the form of private events, physical sensations, bio-behavioral states, psychological feelings, and covert tacts/mands; and 2) learning history with particular discriminative stimuli for reinforcement or punishment. These workshop presenters will discuss the process of conducting FBAs and function-based treatments taking into account the aforementioned components with several different symptoms of psychiatric diagnoses. Symptoms include: anxiety, disturbed attachment, callousness and lack of emotionality, non-suicidal self-injury, and oppositional and defiant behaviors.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) Describe the symptoms of psychiatric disorders as behaviors serving an environmental function; (2)Describe the process of conducting FBAs with children diagnosed with psychiatric disorders; (3) Describe the role of learning history in treating with children diagnosed with psychiatric disorders; (4) Describe the role of motivating operations in the form of private events in treating children diagnosed with psychiatric disorders; (5) Describe how to develop and implement function-based treatments for children diagnosed with psychiatric disorders.
Activities: Participants will listen to didactic information and real-life case histories in homes, schools and community settings, take notes, ask questions, view a power point presentation, present their own cases for feedback, and participate in role-play situations.
Audience: Participants would include board certified behavior analysts, psychologists, counselors, health care providers, social workers and/or teachers who serve children with developmental disabilities or children who are typically-developing who have emotional difficulties and/or have been given psychiatric diagnoses.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W74
CE Offered: PSY/BACB — 
Ethics
Behavior Analytic Training for Health, Life, Fitness, and Peak Personal Performances
Friday, May 26, 2017
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Hyatt Regency, Mineral Hall C
Area: CBM/PRA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Stephen Ray Flora, Ph.D.
STEPHEN RAY FLORA (Youngstown State University)
Description: As obesity, high blood pressure, diabetes, and other health problems are at epidemic proportions for many populations, including populations served by behavior analysts, it is vital that behavior analysts learn to apply behavior analysis to ameliorate these problems and to promote healthy lifestyles as effectively as possible. Medical, behavioral, and psychological benefits of exercise, athletic participation, physical fitness are covered. The workshop will teach participants to use applied behavior analysis principles to objectively access, and optimally improve their own, or clients' physical fitness, health, and, if desired, athletic performances. Emphasis will be placed on behavior analytic gradual change techniques; optimal goal setting parameters; objective, data based analysis and decision making; and on how the use of behavioral analytic experimental designs, such as multiple baselines across situations and bounded changing criterion designs, may not just be used to measure change, but actually facilitate effective behavioral change. A focus will be on web based, fitness "personal quantification" tools (Strava, fitbit, etc) from a behavior analytic and ethical perspective. Although millions post personal fitness data, for ethical and legal purposes an explicit informed consent wavier of privacy should be obtained before any devices are used with clients. Even with consent ethical considerations are necessary.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) State many of the behavioral, psychological, and medical benefits of physical fitness, athletic participation, and living a healthy lifestyle; (2) Perform functional assessment of current health and fitness related behaviors; (3) Perform task analyses of healthy eating behaviors; safe, effective exercise; and skilled athletic performances; (4) Identify personalized reinforcers, motivations, incentives, and values for healthy lifestyles, physical fitness and athleticism; (5) Understand the importance of, and how to effectively use, goal setting, task analysis, pinpointing; (6) Understand how to identify skill gaps,how to set realistically achievable goals,and how to effectively use publicly posted goals to achieve fitness and optimal athletic performance; (7)Use behavior analytic experimental designs to not only measure and access behavioral change but to facilitate health, fitness, and athletic behavioral changes; (8) Use the concepts of optimal physiological arousal, periodization, and super compensation in designing a personalized training program; (9) Analyze and use web-based, social media tools as health and fitness aids; (10) State ethical and legal dilemmas and dangers of using commercial internet based personal quantification; (11) Write an informed consent covering commercial personal quantification usage; (12) Use data collection, charting, and graphing to optimize fitness and improve eating related behaviors.
Activities: Participants will be guided though presented information with PowerPoint slides, worksheets and lecture handouts that will provide participants with the information necessary learn the medical, behavioral, and psychological benefits of fitness and develop effective programs for improving health, physical fitness, diet behaviors, and healthy lifestyles; develop effective programs to optimize athletic performance; to use Behavior Analytic Experimental Designs to access and facilitate desired behavioral change: and state ethical and legal dilemmas and dangers of using commercial internet based personal quantification. Write an informed consent covering commercial personal quantification usage.
Audience: The target audience is board certified behavior analysts (BCBA), BCaBAs, psychologists, personal trainers, and others interested in learning to use behavior analytic procedures to promote healthy lifestyles, fitness, or to optimize elite performance. Professionals with a strong interest in behavioral medicine, or health and fitness will also benefit.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W75
CE Offered: PSY
Systematically Evaluating the Comprehensiveness of a Child's (an Adult's) Treatment Plan for Addressing Problems and Building Upon the Gifts of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder
Friday, May 26, 2017
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Hyatt Regency, Capitol Ballroom 6
Area: CBM/PRA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Richard Cook, M.D.
RICHARD COOK (Penn State University; Applied Behavioral Medicine Associates)
Description: Appropriate "treatment" for Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), by standards of multiple organizations representing those having or treating it, typically include "medication" and "behavior therapy," defined in various ways, yet studies of various populations often conclude that those within the cohort get cursory medication check visits (if medication is used at all) and "behavior" therapy, the topography of which varies greatly, often with little resemblance to approaches which an applied behavior analyst would recognize, again, if any behavior therapy at all. This workshop uses a combination of a medical and public health problem solving model to teach attendees how to evaluate the adequacy of an individuals treatment plan within a customizable, practical group of domains, and apply behaviorally sound principles to effect changes that will both address the problems and build upon the "gifts" associated with ADHD.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusionof the workshop, participants will be able to: (1)identify domains of behavior relevant to each individual; (2) practice a systematic approach to applying the systematic approach taught to both problem and "gift" behaviors associated with ADHD; (3)develop their own customized guide for systematically evaluating the comprehensiveness of an ADHD treatment plan for a child or an adult.
Activities: lecture, discussion guided notes use of pre-scripted algorithms for which attendees will practice and learn the approach to modifying for each individual's ADHD treatment plan for whom evaluation is performed
Audience: Workshop level appropriate for: clinicians who treat patients with ADHD;clinicians who have children with ADHD;clinicians who themselves have ADHD irrespective of the attendee's academic credentials or years of clinical practice.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
Keyword(s): ADD, ADD/ADHD, ADHD
 
Workshop #W76
CE Offered: BACB/PSY/QABA
Teaching the Essential Eight Skills: Preparing Children With Developmental Disabilities, Including Autism, for the Rest of Their Lives
Friday, May 26, 2017
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Hyatt Regency, Mineral Hall D
Area: DDA/AUT; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Patrick E. McGreevy, Ph.D.
PATRICK E. MCGREEVY (Patrick McGreevy and Associates), TROY FRY (Patrick McGreevy and Associates)
Description: Many Practitioners working with children with developmental disabilities, including autism, have become Board Certified Behavior Analysts within the past 4-5 years. Often, their instruction was based on The BACB Fourth Edition Task List, which includes no items that would help them decide what skills to target and teach. This workshop will familiarize participants with the difference between developmental skills and functional skills, and will teach them to target and teach the Essential Eight Skills from Essential for Living.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) describe and differentiate examples of developmental and functional skills; (2) name and describe the Essential Eight Skills; (3) demonstrate how to teach each of the Essential Eight Skills.
Activities: This workshop will include lecture, discussion, and guided practice on how to teach the Essential Eight Skills.
Audience: This basic-level workshop is designed for practicing behavior analysts.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
Keyword(s): autism, developmental disabilities, functional skills, life skills
 
Workshop #W77
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Schedule-Induced Behaviors: Origins of Excessive Behaviors and Procedures to Minimize Their Influence
Friday, May 26, 2017
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Hyatt Regency, Capitol Ballroom 7
Area: EAB/CBM; Domain: Basic Research
CE Instructor: Jeff Kupfer, Ph.D.
JEFF KUPFER (Learning Services Neurobehavioral Institute - West; Imagine Behavioral Health Services; Jeff Kupfer, PA), RONALD F. ALLEN (Simmons College)
Description: Adjunctive or schedule-induced behaviors (sometimes maladaptive and always excessive) are behaviors that are maintained at a high probability by stimuli that derive their reinforcing properties as a function of parameters governing the availability of some other class of reinforcement. In non-human subjects, some schedules of reinforcement have been shown to generate strange behaviors such as: polydipsia, attack against members of its own species, self-induced escape, pica, and hyperactivity; In human subjects, these same schedules can exaggerate behaviors such as fluid intake, aggression, pacing, grooming, eating, stereotyped behavior, smoking and, quite possibly-- wretched excess. This presentation is an introduction to schedule-induced behaviors. A videotape will be shown demonstrating various types of schedule-induced behaviors in a rat and pigeon. Studies describing functional relationships with reinforcement schedules and generator schedules (i.e., schedules that promote schedule-induced behaviors) will be reviewed, as well as functional assessment and measurement strategies. Alternative reinforcement strategies in applied settings will be reviewed and case studies will be presented comparing fixed- vs. variable-DRO schedules.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) define schedule-induced behavior and give examples; (2) describe the function(s) relating levels of schedule-induced to rate of reinforcement, as well as other controlling variables for schedule-induced responding; (3) complete assessment materials for schedule-induced responding; (4) describe manipulations determined to reduce levels of schedule-induced behavior.
Activities: Small group breakout
Audience: Advanced
Content Area: Theory
Instruction Level: Advanced
 
Workshop #W78
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Managing Young Children's Behavior With GAMES: Group-Contingency Approaches for Managing Early-Childhood Settings
Friday, May 26, 2017
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Hyatt Regency, Quartz A
Area: EDC/TBA; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Sheila R. Alber-Morgan, Ph.D.
SHEILA R. ALBER-MORGAN (The Ohio State University), MARIA HELTON (The Ohio State University)
Description: Managing student behavior is a critical skill needed by all classroom teachers. Students who learn in a well-managed classroom tend to demonstrate higher academic achievement than students in a poorly managed classroom (e.g., Burke, Oats, Ringle, O'Niell-Fichtner, & DelGaudio, 2011; Matsumura, Slater & Crosson, 2008). Many teachers of young children find it difficult and frustrating to manage the plethora of challenging behaviors their students emit. Using group contingencies is an evidence-based practice for decreasing disruptions and increasing academic productivity and on-task behavior. Using group contingencies as a class-wide intervention is an efficient way to manage the behavior of many students simultaneously, requires minimal training, and is less costly than individualized behavioral interventions (Morrison & Jones, 2007). The purpose of this workshop is to provide BCBAs with practical strategies they can use with teachers in school districts in the classwide or schoolwide implementation of group contingencies to increase overall academic and behavioral success of young children. Specifically, participants in the workshop will be presented with strategies for implementing three different kinds of group contingencies–independent, interdependent, and dependent–for managing the wide array of challenging student behaviors in early childhood classrooms.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) explain the components and operations of the three types of group contingencies and apply them to the early childhood environment; (2) design several group contingency interventions for early childhood classrooms; (3) make appropriate decisions for customizing group contingencies for each unique classroom; (4) instruct school teams through the implementation of group classroom management strategies in the early childhood environment.
Activities: This workshop will consist of the following activities: lecture, video observation, guided practice, and group application activities. Content will be presented though lecture, video observation, and discussion. Application activities will consist of designing classroom management strategies for one or more of the group contingencies presented in this workshop. Participants work in teams to develop a comprehensive plan for specific early childhood settings. Supplemental materials include a workshop guide booklet that provides direction for creating and customizing each of the three types of group contingencies.
Audience: The target audience will be BCBAs who provide consultative services to school districts.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): classroom management, early childhood, group contingencies
 
Workshop #W79
CE Offered: PSY/BACB — 
Supervision
CANCELED: Guidelines for the Establishment of a University-Based Practical Training System
Friday, May 26, 2017
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Hyatt Regency
Area: EDC/PRA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Molly Dubuque, M.A.
MOLLY DUBUQUE (University of Louisville), ERICK M. DUBUQUE (University of Louisville)
Description: Individuals interested in applying to sit for a Behavior Analyst Certification Board (BACB) examination are required to accumulate a predetermined number of experience and supervision hours under the BACB Experience Standards. Currently, the BACB allows students to accumulate these hours while enrolled in a higher education training program that contains a BACB Approved Course Sequence (ACS). There are numerous professional and financial benefits for programs offering practical training opportunities to students. However, creating a viable practical training system requires careful planning and organization. The purpose of this workshop is to provide some guidelines and recommendations for establishing one type of university-based practical training system using community-based sites.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1)Identify the roles and responsibilities of all parties involves in practical training; (2)Write policies and procedures that support the creation and maintenance of a university-based practical training system that is compliant with the Behavior Analyst Certification Board's experiential standards; (3)Implement strategies for establishing and maintaining practical training relationships with community partners; (4)Logically sequence practical training learning objectives across semesters.
Activities: The format combines lecture, discussion, small group activities, and choral responding.
Audience: The target audience for this workshop are faculty and administrators interested in establishing or updating a practical training component into their program.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): practical training, supervision
 
 
Workshop #W80
CE Offered: PSY/BACB — 
Supervision
Part Three: Effective Supervisors Do What It Takes! Improving Staff and Organizational Performance to Achieve Desired Client Outcomes
Friday, May 26, 2017
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Hyatt Regency, Quartz B
Area: OBM/AUT; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Guy S. Bruce, Ed.D.
GUY S. BRUCE (Appealing Solutions, LLC)
Description: Do you work as an employee, supervisor, or director of an agency that provides services to clients with learning difficulties? Are you satisfied with your clients' progress? Behavior analysis developed a powerful technology for helping people, but too many clients don't receive the benefits. Why not? The easy answer is that employees don't do what they are told. But the employees' performance, just like their clients' performance, is a product of their environment. Do employees have the resources, training, and management necessary to help their clients achieve their goals? What about their supervisors? What about their directors? Organizations are groups of individuals who must work together to provide their clients with the outcomes they want. The failure of clients to make adequate progress is not usually an individual employee performance problem, but a performance problem at the system process, and individual levels of the organization. This workshop will provide participants with a set of tools to pinpoint organizational performance problems, analyze their causes, recommend the best solutions, solve the problems by designing and implementing solutions that might include more efficient resources, training, and management practices, and evaluate their effectiveness, efficiency, and return on investment. Please note: This workshop takes place in three parts; attendees must complete allthree parts to receive continuing education credits.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will be able to: (1) define desired client results and necessary performance, then measure and evaluate current client results and performance, including measures of client progress called "celeration efficiency;" (2) define desired staff performance at the system, process, and individual levels; measure and evaluate current staff performance at each level; (3) perform a data-based analysis of staff performance problems to identify their causes; (4) recommend solutions to performance problems with the best return on investment; (5) design and implement those solutions, which may include staff resources, training and management; (6) evaluate the effectiveness, efficiency, and return on investment of those solutions.
Activities: This workshop provides a variety of training aids including case studies, practice cards, practice exercises, project worksheets, job aids, and computer-based charting software.
Audience: This three-part workshop is for supervisors, staff trainers, program designers, and directors of schools and agencies serving people with learning difficulties. Attend this workshop to learn the skills needed to ensure that employees are effective in helping clients achieve their goals! Earn a total of 12 CEUs by completing all three parts. (You may use 3 of these to meet the new BACB requirement for supervisors.)
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W81
CE Offered: PSY/BACB — 
Ethics
CANCELED: The Pulse of Behavior Analysis: Social Validity as a Process
Friday, May 26, 2017
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Hyatt Regency
Area: PCH; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Kara Reagon, Ph.D.
KARA REAGON (Beacon Services of Connecticut), JUSTIN B. LEAF (Autism Partnership Foundation), JOSEPH H. CIHON (Autism Partnership Foundation; Endicott College), JULIA FERGUSON (Autism Partnership)
Description: The purpose of this workshop is to review the characteristics of Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA), define social validity, review the current peer reviewed research including social validity from the Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, as well as other key publications related to the topic. Participants will develop an understanding of conceptual and procedural issues related to social validity, preference, treatment integrity, generalization and maintenance for applied research and clinical practice; as well as directions for future research. The workshop will include power point presentation and handouts. It will entail didactic instruction, role-plays, written activities, surveys, and task analyses. There are no foreseen risks associated with participating in this workshop. The content is based on previous methodological approaches to social validity, theoretical foundations of ABA (Baer, Wolf, & Risley, 1968, 1987) and social validity (Wolf, 1978), current research and clinical practice. There is no commercial support for the workshop or instructors. Furthermore, there are no relationships that could be reasonably construed as a conflict of interest.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to:(1) State the defining characteristics of Applied Behavior Analysis; (2) Define and assess social validity; (3)Define and measure treatment integrity; (4)Define, program for and assess generalization as it relates to social validity; (5)Define, promote and measure maintenance; (6)Give examples of how to assess preference of consumers and clients;(7)Use social validity task analyses with consumers and clients in the development of treatment programs for clients; (8) Participants will describe recent research-based examples of social validity.
Activities: power point presentation, lecture, handouts, didactic instruction, small group activities, role-plays, written activities, surveys, and task analyses.
Audience: Intermediate;new BCBAs, junior BCBAs (less than 5 years' experience) and young researchers
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): generalization maintenance, preference, social validity, treatment integrity
 
 
Workshop #W82
CE Offered: BACB/PSY/QABA — 
Ethics
The Professional and Ethical Compliance Code for Behavior Analysts: Bring Your Ethical Scenarios
Friday, May 26, 2017
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Convention Center 401/402
Area: PRA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Amanda L. Little, Ph.D.
AMANDA L. LITTLE (The University of Texas at Austin, The Meadows Center), NANETTE L. PERRIN (LifeShare Management Group)
Description: Certified behavior analysts, applicants, and even approved course sequences are now required to abide by the Professional and Ethical Compliance Code (BACB, 2014). As of January 2016, this approved document became enforceable by the BACB. The Code gives us valuable guidance as practitioners in the world of behavior analysis. This workshop will actively engage participants in discussions surrounding their own ethical dilemmas that occur in the home, clinics, and within schools and other organizations. Addressing the real world ethical dilemmas during implementation of behavior analysis can be a challenging endeavor especially for new professionals (Bailey & Burch, 2011). This workshop will discuss the 10 codes/guidelines that comprise the new Professional and Ethical Compliance Code (BACB, 2014). The instructors will quiz participants on their knowledge of each of the 10 guidelines, review each guideline, assist participants in identifying the appropriate ethical guideline related to their scenarios, and foster conversation around appropriate actions that could be taken. Bailey and Burch (2016) provide information in regards to these codes that will be shared with participants. A post quiz will also help review the workshop information.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) State the 10 guidelines/codes of the Professional and Ethical Compliance Code (BACB, 2014); (2) Accurately identify personal ethical dilemmas; (3) Accurately identify which guideline addresses the dilemmas; (4) Increase percentage of correct quiz questions related to ethics in behavior analysis.
Activities: Take pre/post quizzes regarding ethical behavior of behavior analysts Lecture on the 10 Guidelines/Codes in the Professional and Ethical Compliance Code for Behavior Analysts (BACB, 2014) Lecture on Bailey and Burch (2011) viewpoints on ethical guidelines of behavior analysts Exercise to discuss participants' ethical examples Discussion on how to respond to ethical dilemmas that professionals in the field have encountered and shared with the group
Audience: Board Certified Behavior Analysts-Doctorate, Board Certified Behavior Analysts, Board Certified Associate Behavior Analysts, and Registered Behavior Technicians, or those training to be any of these who are seeking additional practice identifying and appropriately responding to ethical dilemmas they may face in their professional interactions with individuals/families, supervisors/supervisees, and other service providers.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): ethical practice, ethics, home/community
 
Workshop #W83
CE Offered: BACB/QABA
Save Time in Microsoft Excel Automating Phase Change Lines and Labels, Selecting Date Ranges, and Creating Templates
Friday, May 26, 2017
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Hyatt Regency, Mineral Hall E
Area: PRA/AUT; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Neil Deochand, M.S.
NEIL DEOCHAND (Western Michigan University), CODY MORRIS (Western Michigan University )
Description: Excel is a widely used versatile tool, but it is not always user-friendly when meeting the unique needs of the behavioral practitioner. The drawing in of phase lines and repetitive typing of phase labels constitutes a laborious and repetitive task for behavior analysts. Few solutions have been offered to automating the phase labels, the descriptive text that accompanies a phase change line, despite their pervasive use in behavior analytic graphical displays. The purpose of this workshop is to offer an updated way (and free templates) to add phase change lines with their respective labels so they are updated in all graphs from a single cell in a worksheet, and teach attendees how to adjust their date ranges with minimal effort.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) design and create clear graphical displays in Microsoft Excel; (2) use embedded elements for phase labels and phase change lines that stay fixed to the graph; (3) automatically update date ranges for all graphs; (4) create templates to save time.
Activities: Instructional activities: Video observation, small group breakout, supplemental materials in the form of templates will be provided Workshop objectives: Minimize drawing in elements to graphs which do not stay fixed to the graph when moved or updated. Reduce time taken to create a graphs using templates. Increase fluency graphing in Microsoft Excel.
Audience: Board Certified Behavior Analysts (BCBAs), Board Certified Assistant Behavior Analysts (BCaBAs), those seeking behavioral certification, psychologists, and any health care providers who track behavioral data. This workshop is for those who have some basic knowledge regarding the use of Excel for creating graphical displays.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Excel®, graphing, phase change, single-subject design
 
Workshop #W84
CE Offered: BACB/QABA — 
Supervision
Software Tools for Direct Observation: Hands-On Learning of ObserverWare for Services Providers and Researchers
Friday, May 26, 2017
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Convention Center 403/404
Area: PRA/EDC; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Thomas L. Sharpe, Jr., Ed.D.
THOMAS L. SHARPE, JR. (Educational Consulting, Inc.; ABA Therapy Solutions, LLC), JOHN KOPERWAS (Educational Consulting, Inc.)
Description: This workshop will provide hands on application of a user friendly software package designed to collect and analyze discrete and time-based behavioral data for evaluation and feedback applications in direct observation client settings. Workshop information is useful to direct services providers, graduate students, behavioral psychologists, CBA professionals, and researchers -- all interested in analyzing complex configurations of behaviors emitted at high rates, oftentimes overlap in time, and which are context dependent. Discussion includes (a) recommended procedures when collecting time-based data in the live setting and from videotape records, and (b) computer generated behavior descriptions, graphic displays, statistical analyses and reliability comparisons of data files when engaged in data analysis, data based feedback, and assessment of data integrity. Participants will be provided with all workshop presentation materials and a complimentary downloadable copy of the complete software package along with a .pdf file summary copy of a compatible research methods text published by Sage Publications. Content has obtained credibility, as demonstrated by the involvement of the broader practice, education, and science communities in study and application of findings, procedures, practices, and theoretical concepts. Workshop participants will need to bring an IBM compatible laptop and/or an iPad to facilitate hands-on workshop interactions.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) construct and apply systemic observation systems;(2) generate a time-based behavioral record using an inclusive overlapping category system; (3)construct graphic representations; (4)perform traditional and sequential analyses using multiple measurement methodologies; (5)edit graphic data representations and apply relevant visual and statistical analyses; (6) conduct reliability and treatment fidelity analyses; (7) apply a variety of data record, edit, and merge functions when operating with complex multiple event category systems; (8) discuss the principles and practice of discrete and sequential behavior analysis methods; (9) apply a range of computer-based data collection, data analysis, data based feedback, and reliability procedures to their particular behavior analysis interests; (10) understand and apply a range of computer-based descriptive and statistical data analysis techniques in relation to discrete and sequential data sets; (11) construct a variety of behavior graphs and apply appropriate analysis and client feedback techniques to the graph types covered, and in relation to direct wervices and applied research application examples.
Activities: Activities include: (1) review of traditional behavior analysis recording methods; (2) introduction to, and hands on application of, a computer-based package designed to enhance behavior analyses of complex interactive settings; (3) detailed hands-on demonstration of data collection features, discrete and sequential analysis capabilities, within and across data-file graphic representations, and a variety of reliability, treatment fidelity, and data manipulation and editing functions; all designed to facilitate applied activities in behavior planning, assessment, treatment, feedback, and ongoing observation of a variety of settings and environments. The format combines lecture, small group and individualized activities, guided practice, and competency facilitating exercises.
Audience: Direct services providers, graduate students, behavior analysts, CBA and related therapists working in a variety of applied and experimental settings who are interested in the interactive nature of behavior in situations where study of multiple behaviors and events, multiple participants, and changing setting variables are present. Those working in educational and social science settings and who are challenged with how to describe and analyze highly interactive behavioral transactions should find the workshop experience and complimentary software particularly appealing to a wide range of research and assessment applications.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W85
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Using Physical Activity and Game to Enhance Learning, Social Skills, and Self-Control With Autistic and Typical Populations
Friday, May 26, 2017
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Convention Center 405
Area: PRA/AUT; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Eitan Eldar, Ph.D.
EITAN ELDAR (Kibbutzim College, Israel)
Description: The presented model (Eldar, 2006) emphasizes the uniqueness of movement and game as an ideal context enabling teachers and clinicians to design a challenging learning atmosphere for their students. The model is based on a series of scripts offering a simulation of real life situations. It can support a specific clinical goal such as developing self-control; support a school curriculum; serve as an extended behavioral program for individuals / groups. The model has recently been implemented with Autistic children, supporting communication and social skills on an individual level and as a preparation for inclusion. The rationale behind developing the model (Eldar & Ayvazo, 2009) will be discussed and specific behavioral procedures and principles supporting the model will be cited (Eldar, 2008). The structure of the model will be described, followed by implementation examples. Components of the model, modified during the past 18 years, will then be portrayed. The workshop will conclude with recommendations and examples for utilizing the model in a variety of educational and clinical settings applicable to various populations. Attention will be devoted to using these procedures as a part of an individual program for Autistic populations and for supporting their inclusion in the regular education system.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) Explain the unique characteristics of physical activity and games as supportive learning contexts; (2) Cite behavioral principles and procedures that enhance learning in these contexts; (3) Present the general structure of the model and describe its components; (4) Design various physical activities as clinical scripts, serving specific behavioral goals.; (5) Use and modify observation forms to evaluate students'progress; (6) Adapt the components of the model to different populations and programs; (7) Explain the rationale of the model to parents and practitioners.
Activities: 1. A presentation of the theoretical background of the model, defining the rationale behind it. 2. An open discussion: How physical activity can serve as a learning context. 3. A video presentation illustrating the implementation of the model in various settings and in different cultures. 4. Active demonstration of games involving the workshop's participants. 5. Planning trials - participants will practice activity and program design based on the model.
Audience: Behavior Analysts, Teachers, Clinicians, Psychologists, Physical Educators
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Autism, Physical Activity, Self Control, Social Skills
 
Workshop #W86
CE Offered: PSY/BACB — 
Supervision
CANCELED: Competency Building Through Performance Planning: Applications of ABA for the Development of Professional and Clinical Skills in Pre-Certification BCBA and BCaBA Trainees
Friday, May 26, 2017
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Hyatt Regency
Area: PRA/TBA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Rachel N.S. Cavalari, Ph.D.
RACHEL N.S. CAVALARI (Institute for Child Development; Binghamton University)
Description: Trainees pursuing the BCBA and BCaBA credentials are required to be supervised by certified professionals who have completed training based on the BACB Supervisor Training Curriculum Outline. This outline cites responsibility for improving and maintaining effective repertoires of the trainee, specifying the importance of behavioral skills training along with ongoing objective assessment of specified performance criteria. Although targeted behavior analytic skills are clearly an area of focus, evaluation of supervisee performance per the BACB Experience Supervision Form requires emphasis on the development of a number of general professional skills, including self-awareness of weaknesses for further development. This workshop will review evidence-based approaches to supervision (Reid & Parsons, 2006; Reid, Parsons, & Green, 2012) to support pre-certification trainees in pursuit of their BCaBA or BCBA credential. Specific examples of implementation of these approaches to build both task list content mastery and better clinical and professional skills will be provided, including the development of self-awareness of strengths and weaknesses. This training program is based on the BACB Supervisor Training Curriculum Outline but is offered independent of the BACB.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) identify and describe the six areas of supervision outlined in the BACB Supervisor Training Curriculum Outline; (2) develop an outline for pre-certification trainee supervision that involves application of evidence-based strategies to required parameters of BACB supervision; (3) apply a template outline to an initial individual training plan for a hypothetical pre-certification trainee to assess strengths and weaknesses of the template.
Activities: This workshop will involve didactic review of the BACB Supervisor Training Curriculum Outline and evidence-based strategies for supervision (60 minutes; Objective 1). Resource materials and template forms for translating these concepts and strategies into a training outline will be circulated and participants will be asked to create an outline template packet for their own use. This will be accomplished through a combination of guided discussion and small group breakout (45 minutes; Objective 2). Finally, participants will be given a hypothetical pre-certification trainee description and asked to apply their selected template to the supervisee's training plan to determine strengths and weaknesses of their template in small group breakouts (45 minutes; Objective 3). The final portion of the workshop will involve a period for discussion and questions (30 minutes). Participants will be provided with two additional hypothetical trainee scenarios to take with them to continue assessing the effectiveness of their template for use in their practice setting.
Audience: This workshop is intended for BCBA and BCBA-D intermediate-level certificants who are developing their supervision skills in preparation for supervising pre-certification trainees.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): competence, skill-building, supervision
 
 
Workshop #W87
CE Offered: PSY/BACB — 
Ethics
CANCELED: Acting Out: Learning BACB Ethics and Problem-Solving Strategies Through Interactive Team-Based Learning
Friday, May 26, 2017
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Hyatt Regency
Area: PRA/AUT; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Richard Wayne Fuqua, Ph.D.
RICHARD WAYNE FUQUA (Western Michigan University), JON S. BAILEY (Florida State University)
Description: This workshop is designed primarily for practitioners who have some familiarity with the Professional and Ethical Compliance Code for Behavior Analysis from the Behavior Analysis Certification Board (BACB) and wish to improve their skills to (a) identify and analyze ethical challenges, (b) develop strategies to resolve ethical challenges, (c) refine their skills to tactfully and effectively resolve ethical challenges, and (d) obtain CEUs in the ethics domain as required for BACB recertification. Others, including licensed psychologists, who are interested in applying BACB ethical guidelines to real-world ethical challenges in practice and research are also encouraged to attend. Participants should be prepared to describe and discuss real world ethics cases in a manner that protects the identity of those individuals involved in the ethics cases.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) identify and analyze ethical challenges; (2) identify and troubleshoot strategies to resolve ethical challenges; (3) refine their skills to tactfully and effectively resolve ethical challenges, (4) identify team based learning strategies that can be used to promote BACB ethics in work and educational settings.
Activities: This workshop will include very limited lecture content. Emphasis will be placed on small group activities and discussion, role plays, guided practice and fluency building exercises.
Audience: Intermediate level. This workshop assumes some familiarity with the Professional and Ethical Compliance Code (PECC) for Behavior Analysis from the Behavior Analysis Certification Board (BACB).
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
 
Workshop #W88
CE Offered: PSY/BACB — 
Supervision
CANCELED: The Apprentice: An Innovative Approach to Meet the BACB’s Supervision Standards
Friday, May 26, 2017
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Hyatt Regency
Area: PRA/AUT; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: William Tim Courtney, M.A.
WILLIAM TIM COURTNEY (Little Star Center), MARY ROSSWURM (Little Star Center)
Description: Increased standards for supervision are needed for the betterment of the field. However, it is a challenge for organizations to meet these standards. Throughout the ages, experts in all trades have passed along their wisdom through apprenticeship opportunities. An apprenticeship model to mentor, educate, and train students on the science of human behavior will be discussed, including a summary of the model, typical supervision activities, and meeting schedules. In addition, the presentation will include billing considerations and general logistical issues associated within an apprenticeship model. The content of this workshop is based upon the article, "The Apprentice: An Innovative Approach to Meet the Behavior Analysis Certification Board's Supervision Standards," published in Behavior Analysis in Practice.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) Identify the key responsibilities in an apprenticeship model for BCBA supervisors; (2) Identify the key responsibilities of the supervisees to gain fieldwork experience to become BCBAs; (3) Create performance-based objectives relevant to what the supervisee will both experience and accomplish through the apprenticeship model; (4) Identify and manage logistical and billing considerations that are part of the apprenticeship model; (5) Pinpoint key objectives to measure the apprentice's performance on a monthly basis.
Activities: Instructional strategies include: lecture, discussion, and small group breakout
Audience: For BCBA practitioners who provide supervision under the Behavior Analysis Certification Board's requirements.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
 
Workshop #W89
CE Offered: PSY/BACB — 
Supervision
CANCELED: Ethical Issues in Training and Supervising RBTs, BCaBAs, and Candidates for the BCBA Credential
Friday, May 26, 2017
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Hyatt Regency
Area: PRA/EDC; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Melissa L. Olive, Ph.D.
MELISSA L. OLIVE (Applied Behavioral Strategies LLC)
Description: Many practicing BCABAs and BCBAs have a responsibility of supervising front-line therapists and RBTs. Some BCBAs have an additional responsibility of supervising BCaBAs or Candidates for the BCBA credential. This session will identify the BACB Professional and Ethical Compliance Code for Behavior Analysts that relate to this job duty which is only one of many duties of practicing behavior analysts. Participants will use case studies to practice recognizing and describing potential ethical violations as well as how to address them. Participants will learn several strategies for preventing subsequent violations, and finally they will discuss steps for re-training implementers to prevent future violations. Time will be allotted for extensive question and answer. Detailed handouts will be provided.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) describe the new supervision requirements; (2) describe the reasons for effective, evidence-based supervision; (3) describe the potential outcomes of ineffective supervision; (4) describe or demonstrate components of effective, evidence-based supervision; (5) identify potential ethics violations for front-line therapists and other non-certified implementers; (6) recognize and describe possible ethical violations; (7) list 5 strategies for preventing subsequent violations; (8) discuss three methods for providing training or re-training implementers to prevent future ethical violations; (9) describe methods for his/her ongoing professional development as a supervision; (10) describe methods for the ongoing professional development of the supervisee.
Activities: Lecture, Discussion, Case Study, Question and Answer
Audience: Practicing Behavior Analysts, Supervisors of Practicing Behavior Analysts
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Ethics, Supervision
 
 
Workshop #W90
CE Offered: PSY/BACB — 
Ethics
Aggressive and Violent Behavior: Behavioral Conceptualization, Prevention, and Treatment
Friday, May 26, 2017
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Hyatt Regency, Mineral Hall F
Area: PRA/CBM; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Peter Sturmey, Ph.D.
PETER STURMEY (The Graduate Center and Queens College, City University of New York)
Description: Behavior comes from three causes: Biological evolution, cultural evolution and evolution of the operant during the life span. Although Applied Behavior Analysis has long focused on functional analysis and treatment of aggression and violence, especially in people with little developmental disabilities, less attention has been paid to the broad context of the causes of aggression and violence . This workshop will provide a comprehensive review of aggression and violence and its implications for prevention and treatment at the level of individuals, couples and society.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) describe the evidence for evolution of aggression and violence; (2) describedifferences between and within cultures in the degree of aggression and violence; (3) describe the development of aggression and violent behavior within individual humans; (4) describe the implications for prevention and treatment at the level of the individual, couple, and society.
Activities: The workshop will use lecture, video demonstrations, and a group exercise.
Audience: Intermediate including Masters and Doctoral level practitioners and teachers.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W91
CE Offered: BACB/PSY/QABA — 
Ethics
Gender-Affirming Clinical Skills for Behavior Analysts: Looking Through the Lens of BACB Ethics
Friday, May 26, 2017
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Hyatt Regency, Mineral Hall G
Area: PRA/CSS; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Fawna Stockwell, Ph.D.
FAWNA STOCKWELL (Upswing Advocates; The Chicago School of Professional Psychology, Chicago Campus), WORNER LELAND (Upswing Advocates)
Description: Transgender and gender nonconforming identities have gained increasing visibility within recent years, and gender plays a significant role in how social interactions are constructed for people of all gender identities. This workshop provides an overview of key concepts and social practices related to gender, as well as ways that the BACBs Professional and Ethical Compliance Code addresses gender. The instructors will facilitate a nonjudgmental space for participants to ask questions, explore new content, and brainstorm ways to build gender-affirming practices in their professional work. Participants will learn specific strategies of how Behavior Analysts can promote gender-affirming interactions with their clients, staff, and others. Empirically supported literature and data will be presented where applicable and available, and audience questions and discussion will be welcomed throughout the workshop.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will be able to: (1) state which guidelines in the Professional and Ethical Compliance Code for Behavior Analysts (BACB, 2014) are applicable to gender, (2) select key differences between gender identity, biological sex, gender roles, gender expression/presentation, and sexual orientation, (3) describe ways that the gender binary may restrict responding for all individuals, not only transgender people, and (4) state several concrete strategies to apply to the professional workplace that create a gender affirming environment for clients and staff.
Activities: Activities will include: Pre/post quizzes, lecture, small group discussion, FreeWrite exercises, worksheets, video examples, and online learning activities.
Audience: Audience: BCBA-D, BCBA, BCaBA, RBTs, or those training to be any of these who are interested in building their competence around the topic of gender. Teachers, therapists, and other helping professionals are also welcome to attend.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
Keyword(s): diversity, ethics, gender, sexuality
 
Workshop #W92
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Troubleshooting Speech Programs
Friday, May 26, 2017
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Hyatt Regency, Agate A
Area: PRA/AUT; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Barbara E. Esch, Ph.D.
BARBARA E. ESCH (Esch Behavior Consultants, LLC)
Description: This workshop is an extension of the earlier workshop Developing Vocal Verbal Behavior and will provide participants the opportunity to present individual cases for speech program review to identify specific issues in order to determine appropriate next steps. For participants not presenting a case, its an opportunity to observe the problem solving process related to speech development programs. As a group, we will review information from each selected case. This will include results from echoic assessment and vocalization baselines, video clips, current program data, and other relevant information. For each case, Dr. Esch will discuss how to use this information to select appropriate speech teaching targets, how to best sequence these targets, and how to troubleshoot current problems in the program. General dos and don'ts when teaching speech and articulation will be included. Participants who pre-register for the workshop will be offered the opportunity to submit their learner's case for the group consultation. Prior to the workshop, participants presenting cases will need to submit to Dr. Esch a video permission form, signed by parent or guardian, to allow video review by the workshop audience. Workshop content has obtained credibility, as demonstrated by the involvement of the broader practice, education, and science communities in studying or applying the findings, procedures, practices, or theoretical concepts.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: Describe assessment results, identify appropriate starting points for speech targets, and suggest appropriate next steps for programming.
Activities: Reviews of assessment information, video observation, case consultation, and participant discussion of program recommendations for individual cases submitted by participants.
Audience: Speech pathologists, behavior analysts, clinicians, program directors, and any others who are responsible for helping individuals learn to speak.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): speech acquisition, vocal-verbal
 
Workshop #W93
CE Offered: BACB
Treatment Goal Development for Insurance Approval
Friday, May 26, 2017
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Hyatt Regency, Agate B
Area: PRA/AUT; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Linda S. Heitzman-Powell, Ph.D.
KATRINA OSTMEYER (Integrated Behavioral Technologies, Inc.), LINDA S. HEITZMAN-POWELL (The University of Kansas Medical Center), MIKAYLA M MCHENRY (Integrated Behavioral Technologies, Inc.; Washburn University)
Description: Over the past fifteen years, the forty-three states and the District of Columbia have instituted insurance reforms covering applied behavior analysis (ABA) therapy for individuals affected by autism spectrum disorder (ASD: Autism Insurance Reform, 2015). With these mandates, ABA clinicians are increasingly called to work with third-party payers for approval and ongoing review of ABA treatment plans, a skill set many clinicians have to develop through practice and trial-and-error learning. In this workshop, we will identify many of the difficulties faced by clinicians in working with insurance companies as they work to provide evidence-based interventions for the individuals they serve such as disagreement about appropriate goals, dosage recommended by "medical-necessity," insurance mandate, and best-practices, and what constitutes sufficient progress for continued coverage. Possible solutions and strategies to these challenges will be discussed with a focus on goal development and tracking. Finally, recommendations for successfully working through the appeal process will be discussed.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will be able to: (1) Identify common problems faced by clinicians working with third-party payers; (2) Identify the core deficits in autism spectrum disorders based on both DSM-IV-TR and DSM-5 criteria; (3) Be able to tie identify goals that map onto the core deficits of autism spectrum disorder without compromising treatment plan integrity; (4) Be able to write goals that meet common "medical necessity" criteria; (5) Identify the steps in an appeals process and strategies for a successful appeal.
Activities: During the course of the workshop, lecture will be utilized to convey information prior to moving to guided practice and small group. During guided practice and small-group activities, participants will review treatment goals that have been denied for a variety of reasons and work to rewrite goals for increased likelihood of approval and/or develop rationales for approval without reworking. During guided practice, the group will also work through an appeal. Participants will have the opportunity to share identified goals and plans for feedback on changes to make to increase the likelihood of plan approval.
Audience: This workshop is designed for behavior analysts who work with third-party payers to provide ABA services to individuals diagnosed with autism.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Insurance, Insurance Appeals, Peer Review
 
Workshop #W94
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
CANCELED: Dealing With Adolescence Changes, Transition, and Teaching Adaptive Behavior
Friday, May 26, 2017
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Hyatt Regency
Area: TBA/AUT; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Meera Ramani, M.S.
MEERA RAMANI (ABA India; Behaviour Enrichment Dubai)
Description: Several studies have shown that Applied Behavior Analysis can provide an in-depth structured approach that, if administered by qualified personnel, can lead to positive effects on social behavior. Socialization between individuals is an important characteristic in human development. In individuals with autism, there is a profound deficit with social skills and with social reciprocity. The purpose of this workshop is to demonstrate teaching adaptive behavior such as private and public behavior, avoidance of danger, peer refusal skills, personal space, right and wrong and avoidance of engagement in self-stimulation. The importance of using Applied Behavior Analysis such as shaping, teaching interaction and Discrete Trial Training in teaching these skills will be demonstrated. In this workshop, you will learn what happens before an undesired behavior occurs, what to do after it occurs and how to set goals to change the behavior. You will also learn about strategies you can use to teach your student replacement behaviors.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will be able to: (1) Identify three core deficits; (2) Identify three precursors which lead to inappropriate behaviour; (3) Identify three different teaching procedures and strategies that can be used in teaching adolescent students about abstaining from undesirable behaviour.
Activities: Workshop objectives will be met using instructional strategies including lectures, discussion, case review, small group practice activities and group feedback.
Audience: Behavior analysts, BCBAs, BCaBAs, teachers, psychologists, speech therapists, social skills instructors and other professionals who work with individuals diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorder, specifically in the areas of social skill development.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Perspective taking, Public behaviour, Social relationships, Social skills
 
 
Workshop #W95
CE Offered: PSY/BACB — 
Supervision
Leading by Example: Keys to Effective Behavior Analytic Supervision
Friday, May 26, 2017
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Hyatt Regency, Granite A
Area: TBA/PRA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Jennifer Yakos, M.A.
JENNIFER YAKOS (Institute for Behavioral Training (IBT)), CECILIA KNIGHT (Institute for Behavioral Training)
Description: As more individuals enter the field of Behavior Analysis, defining parameters for appropriate supervision to those seeking BCBA, BCaBA and RBT certification is an important topic of discussion. Providing effective, behavior analytic supervision requires utilizing effective instructional techniques such as Behavioral Skills Training, shaping appropriate professional and ethical behaviors of supervisees, and promoting independence and generalization of skills into the natural setting with clients. This workshop will focus on specific keys to effective supervision, most importantly the practice of leading by example as supervisors. Specific topics will include how to model best practice strategies within supervision, adjusting to the individual needs of each supervisee, providing effective performance feedback, and adhering to ethical guidelines at all times. Additional discussion will focus on specific ethical considerations that arise within supervisory practices and ways to address them, particularly issues with supervising employees, supervising long distance via remote on-line contact, and handling subpar performance of supervisees.
Learning Objectives: Identify and review BACB guidelines for effective, evidence based supervisory practices, including implementing Behavioral Skills Training, delivering effective performance feedback, and individualizing supervision based on the candidate's specific needs. Identify several key strategies for effective supervision, including modeling target behaviors in training sessions, overlap in the natural environment, promoting independent problem solving, and tracking/monitoring supervisee progress. Identify several ethical issues which commonly arise within supervision of BCBA/BCaBA candidates and RBTs, including confidentiality, dual relationships, scope of expertise and ensuring quality of service
Activities: Workshop activities will include a combination of lecture, video demonstration, small group practice activities and large group discussion.
Audience: This workshop would be appropriate for BCBAs providing behavior analytic supervision to individuals seeking BCBA/BCaBA certification, or ongoing supervision to BCaBAs and RBTs. It would also be appropriate for any therapist, educator, administrator, or professional who is supervising and managing the performance of staff, parents, instructional aides, or others.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): BCBA Supervision, Effective Supervision, Supervisory Practices
 
Workshop #W96
CE Offered: BACB/PSY/QABA — 
Ethics
How to Engage in Ethical Practice When One's Supervisor or Agency is Unethical
Friday, May 26, 2017
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Convention Center 406/407
Area: TBA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Ken Winn, M.S.
TERESA CAMILLE KOLU (Cusp Emergence), KEN WINN (Firefly Autism)
Description: This workshop was created due to many prevalent, alarming, and real life student-generated scenarios provided to the author and instructor during a certification-board approved online course sequence in behavior analysis. The growth in online programs reflects an influx of non-behavior analysts to the field hired, in many cases, faster than certification (and training) programs can keep up. In the wake of fluctuating funding streams and new legislation, how can the community of behavior analysts plan to protect against ethical drift and prepare for new challenges? In order to explore this growing concern, we will explore several case studies from the past 5 years of practice in diverse settings in Colorado, a state relatively new to behavior analysis and to insurance-mandated behavior analysis. Case studies and sets of potential solutions will be presented from at least three distinct practice contexts: Instructing new behavior analysis students with varying previous experiences and advanced degrees; supervision in a hospital setting for psychologist-led teams new to behavior analysis; and community behavior analysis settings supporting learners with autism, developmental disabilities, or needs addressed by state-reimbursed early intervention programs. Some implications are discussed for each area of practice, ending with a call to action.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) Discuss rule-governed and contingency shaped examples of code application; (2) Identify features of behavioral environments fostering ethical behavior under optimal (best-case) conditions; (3) Identify discrepancies in resources between best-case and worst-case environments; (4) Tact ways to alter aspects of a behavioral environment contributing to working in long-term worst case scenarios; (5)Identify and generate examples of emergency situations given your client population and behavioral environment; (6) Generate potential solutions (identify connections between situational emergencies or barriers to ethical behavior, and changes in behavioral environments that reduce likelihood of similar future emergency situations); (7)Discuss how to apply ethical, code-complimentary behavior to situations that go beyond common ethics texts.
Activities: Objectives of the workshop will be met through a balance of lecture, small group breakouts, group discussion, and active student responding
Audience: This workshop is intended for new practitioners as well as behavior analysts with many years of experience. Ethical behavior in practice can be a "slippery slope" and practitioners from every level might find this beneficial
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W97
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Teaching Children With Autism to Talk About Private Events: Establishing the Verbal Behavior of Emotions, Inferences, and Perspective Taking
Friday, May 26, 2017
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Hyatt Regency, Granite B
Area: VRB/AUT; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Francesca Degli Espinosa, Ph.D.
FRANCESCA DEGLI ESPINOSA (ABA Clinic, UK)
Description: Educational interventions based on Applied Behaviour Analysis have demonstrated to be most effective in establishing a range of social skills in children with autism. In considering the relationship between social interaction and autism, however, behaviour analysis, both conceptually and in application, has not yet provided a complete operational account of the variables that control the types of behaviour commonly held to denote Theory of Mind, a deficit that is held to be both syndrome-specific and universal to autism (e.g., Baron-Cohen, 2001). This presentation will firstly argue that Theory of Mind should not be viewed as an entity that is either present or absent, but rather as a developmental verbal process that begins in the establishment of tacting public and private events during social interactions in early childhood. Firmly based on such behavioural conceptual framework, the presentation will secondly attempt to provide an analysis of the controlling variables of the component verbal skills that may denote Theory of Mind and in so doing will illustrate a hierarchical sequence of instructional activities to establish: tacting of private events (i.e. emotions), predictions and inferencing (i.e. tacting the source of stimulus control for another person's actual and future behaviour) and, finally, perspective taking in children with autism.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) provide a behaviour analysis of Theory of Mind; (2) illustrate a sequence of instruction; (3) establish the verbal behaviour of private events; (4) illustrate a sequence of instruction to establish perspective taking.
Activities: Lecture and video demonstrations
Audience: Behaviour analysts interested in teaching advanced verbal skills
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Advanced
Keyword(s): Inferences, Perspective taking, Private events
 
Workshop #W98
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
The Acquisition of Behavioral Cusps as the Basics to Develop Language
Friday, May 26, 2017
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Hyatt Regency, Granite C
Area: VRB/AUT; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Richard E. Laitinen, Ph.D.
GLADYS WILLIAMS (CIEL, SPAIN), RICHARD E. LAITINEN (Peronalized Accelerated Learning Systems (PALS)), SARA GARBARINI (David Gregory School )
Description: The purpose of this workshop is to discuss the acquisition of behavioral cusps as basic elements to develop language. Research has shown that basic prerequisites greatly enhance an individual's ability to develop functional language. In this workshop we will provide an overview of the teaching procedures designed to develop these basic skills and tactics to strengthen observational learning in the individual. We will discuss several strategies developed to bring vocal emissions under stimulus control. This discussion will include some basic strategies for teaching tacts as well as a detailed outline of the Rapid Tacting protocol. Building on that knowledge we will introduce a structure that contains elements of Direct Instruction (DI), Precision Teaching (PT) and Relational Frame Theory (RFT), designed to gradually increasing the sophistication and complexity of language with the goal of becoming a functional speaker.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) Identify and describe repertoires that support generative clinical practice; (2) Identify and describe component skills of each repertoire; (3) Practice use of Generative Skills assessment; (4) Formulate training activities that facilitate the emergence of generative clinical application of each repertoire.
Activities: Combination of lecture, discussion, small breakout groups, video observations and demonstrations.
Audience: Intermediate- junior BCBAs, BCBAs and BCBA-Ds
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): ABA, autism, behavioral cusps, verbal behavior
 
Workshop #W99
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
CANCELED: Derived Stimulus Relations: Stimulus Equivalence and RFT Explained?
Friday, May 26, 2017
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Hyatt Regency
Area: VRB/PCH; Domain: Theory
CE Instructor: Timothy M. Weil, Ph.D.
TIMOTHY M. WEIL (Tandem Behavioral Health & Wellness)
Description: Derived stimulus relations is a topic that has been around for awhile but is recently growing in interest with both scientists and practitioners of behavior analysis. There is a great deal of basic behavior analytic research supporting the emergence of derived relations which is currently extending into the applied research domain. Equivalence in particular has been accepted as a necessary topic for behavior analysts as can be seen with its inclusion in the 4th edition of the BACB task list. Students and practitioners will benefit from this workshop in both its basic level, and focus on providing a link from theory to practice. This workshop will gently start with the theoretical system of radical behaviorism/functional contextualism and move towards understanding through presentation on basic and applied research.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) describe basic characteristics of stimulus equivalence; (2)describe basic characteristics of RFT and contrast these with Stimulus Equivalence; (3)describe transformation of stimulus function as a process and identify its crucial outcomes; (4)diagram relational networks and identify transformation of function via myriad relations as a first step towards inclusion in their programming.
Activities: Instruction via lecture and discussion. Individual exercises to establish relational networks and potential function altering effects. Small group activities are included as well.
Audience: Target audience is basic and higher understanding of radical behavioral perspective and skinners operant conditioning model. No knowledge of RFT, Stimulus Equivalence, or derived stimulus relations is necessary as the function of this workshop is to kick off understanding. Those with moderate to advanced understanding of derived stimulus work are encouraged to participate as well.
Content Area: Theory
Instruction Level: Basic
Keyword(s): Derived, RFT, Stimulus Equivalence, Transformation Function
 
 
Special Event #3
Student Welcome Event
Friday, May 26, 2017
6:00 PM–7:00 PM
Hyatt Regency, Capitol Ballroom 1-3
Chair: Christina M. Peters (University of Nevada, Reno)
The ABAI Student Committee will be hosting a Special Welcome Event for current and future student members. During this one-hour session, Student Committee Members will review useful information and distribute materials to help you make the make the best of your convention experience. From tips about how to put your best foot forward, to an overview of must attend events – your Student Committee has you covered. Additionally, ABAI 2017 Student Survival Kits will be available to attendees on a first come first serve basis so don't be late!
 
 
Special Event #4
ABAI Trivia Night
Friday, May 26, 2017
7:00 PM–9:00 PM
Hyatt Regency, Capitol Ballroom 1-3
Chair: Lorraine A Becerra (Utah State University)
Grab your friends and join the Student Committee for a fun night of trivia! Drop in at any time and join one of the 6 rounds hosted by leading researchers and academics in the field of behavior analysis. Test your knowledge about the ABAI organization, the field of behavior analysis, and the city of Denver. Questions will range from easy to difficult and prizes will be delivered for winners of each team. Come mingle with other students and faculty and kick off the conference with a friendly game of trivia!
Keyword(s): Social, Students
 
 
Special Event #5
International Welcome Reception
Friday, May 26, 2017
9:00 PM–10:30 PM
Hyatt Regency, Capitol Ballroom 5-7
Chair: Ingunn Sandaker (Oslo and Akershus University College of Applied Sciences)
All registrants are welcome to join us in celebrating the diversity of our membership and the world-wide dissemination of the science and practice of behavior analysis. A short presentation about international development in the field and ABAI global efforts will be followed by ample time to socialize with friends and colleagues from around the world.
 

BACK TO THE TOP

Modifed by Eddie Soh
SABA DONATE ABAI HOTLINE