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Association for Behavior Analysis International

The Association for Behavior Analysis International® (ABAI) is a nonprofit membership organization with the mission to contribute to the well-being of society by developing, enhancing, and supporting the growth and vitality of the science of behavior analysis through research, education, and practice.

43rd Annual Convention; Denver, CO; 2017

Program by Day for Thursday, May 25, 2017


 

Workshop #W1
CE Offered: PSY/BACB — 
Ethics
If You Are a BCBA, Are You/Can You Become a Dog Trainer? Some Ethics and Some Steps in That Direction
Thursday, May 25, 2017
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Hyatt Regency, Centennial Ballroom C
Area: AAB; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Terri M. Bright, Ph.D.
TERRI M. BRIGHT (MSPCA Angell)
Description: When you have studied behavior analysis, you find yourself being asked about the behavior of non-human species, usually dogs. Do you pause before stepping into the breach and making suggestions? Until you have the tools to implement the assessments and interventions you have used with humans, you will likely not be able to generalize your skills to another species. Safety is also a reason: 4 million people are bitten by dogs each year. To a trained professional, the precursors of aggression are like a blinking neon sign; to a novice, they are unnoticed. Whether in your neighborhood, your home, or your workplace, dogs pose a bite risk to humans. This workshop will first remind BCBAs and others what the ethics are of teaching outside of their scope of training and experience. It will also teach attendees to identify precursors of canid aggression as well as what to do when they see them. Finally, if you are interested in dog training, this workshop will demonstrate generalization of such skills as preference assessments and functional assessment/analysis of dog behavior, and give some simple tools for training dogs, as well as instructions on how to refer to the right dog trainer.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) via videos and textual prompts, identify the precursors of dog aggression and how to stay safe in the presence of an aggressive dog; (2) identify how your behavioral skills are skewed towards humans and how your dog-training skills may be skewed away from science; (3) identify when and if you should intervene with a dog's problem behavior; (4) identify an ethical dog trainer in their geographical area should they need a referral; (5) learn to perform preference assessments and use the Functional Assessment of Dog Behavior (FADB), an assessment created by the workshop presenter.
Activities: Activities will include lecture, discussion, surveys, choral responding, small group breakout, still photos of dogs, dog behavior videos and textual prompts. Objectives will be met through a mixed presentation of discussion, self-scoring, lecture and video demonstrations of dog behavior. Supplemental materials will be provided such as participants will be able to review all photos, videos and surveys after they leave the workshop.
Audience: This basic workshop is meant for those who find themselves in the company of dogs and who are tempted to train them. Though participant's individual dogs' behaviors are not the target of the workshop, enough information will be disseminated so that participants can, perhaps, begin their dog-training at home, using the tenets of ABA and within the scope of the BACB Task List; they will be able to recognize the limits of their behavioral skills across species. Those who come into contact with dogs in the community or workplace and who are fearful or uncertain will be better equipped to act appropriately, be it to gain safety or to find referrals.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
Keyword(s): dog behavior, functional assessment, training ethics
 
Workshop #W2
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Hot Topics in Communication Intervention
Thursday, May 25, 2017
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Hyatt Regency, Quartz A
Area: AUT/DDA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Catherine Horton, M.S.
CATHERINE HORTON (Pyramid Educational Consultants), LORI FROST (Pyramid Educational Consultants), JAIME WEDEL (Pyramid Educational Consultants)
Description: A variety of communication options are available for our learners with complex communication needs. Practitioners must routinely make a choice between implementing low-tech versus high-tech options. This presentation will review the literature related to this topic, including review of the teaching strategies related to the Picture Exchange Communication System. This evidence-based protocol can also be used to successfully teach learners to use Speech Generating Devices (SGDs) and/or tablets with communication apps. Additional concepts related to use of technology for communication purposes will be explored. The concept of Core Vocabulary will be addressed, including characteristics of each individual Core Vocabulary item, with a particular focus on vocabulary functions and relationships to vocabulary size during development. Considerations for appropriately teaching Core Vocabulary will be discussed. A popular approach to teaching Core Vocabulary, known as Aided Language Stimulation, will be reviewed including both pros and cons associated with the approach. In addition, other current approaches to teaching communication skills will be discussed and analyzed in terms of behavioral principles. The talk will conclude with discussion and recommendations for making informed, data-based decisions for teaching communication skills to our learners.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) identify specific functions of individual core vocabulary items; (2) describe criteria for determining when a given vocabulary item should be introduced into a given learner's vocabulary; (3) describe teaching strategies related to both high- and low-tech communication systems.
Activities: Review of literature regarding high and low-tech communication, review PECS protocol, review published guidelines on how to effectively transition from PECS to SGD, review videos demonstrating effective use and potential problems with transitions, and review how to transition from PECS to SGDs and/or tablet apps brought to the workshop by participants.
Audience: This workshop is appropriate for any team member working with learners with complex communication needs. This may include behavior analysts, speech/language pathologists, teachers and/or others involved with communication training with children and adults with disabilities including ASD.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Aided Language, Core Vocabulary, PECS, Pyramid
 
Workshop #W3
CE Offered: BACB/PSY/QABA
Application of the Play and Language (PAL) Program for Early Autism Intervention
Thursday, May 25, 2017
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Hyatt Regency, Mineral Hall B
Area: AUT/DDA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Evelyn Amanda Boutot, Ph.D.
EVELYN AMANDA BOUTOT (Texas State University), SAMUEL DIGANGI (Arizona State University)
Description: This hands-on workshop will teach participants how to use a new early intervention assessment and curriculum, the PAL, to develop instructional programs for young children with or at risk for autism spectrum disorder or other developmental disabilities. Based on 2 years of pilot use and 2 years of broader practice, the PAL is designed for infants and toddlers ages 0-5 years of age and covers five domains: Imitation and play skills, joint attention and social interaction, visual discrimination, receptive language, expressive language. The authors/presenters will provide participants with a basic overview of the PAL development (over a 10 year period, including pilot testing and content analysis by subject matter experts), demonstrate and provide opportunities to practice scoring the assessment for initial program development and on-going progress monitoring, and will demonstrate and provide practice on developing an intervention program based on assessment results. Presenters will also describe how the PAL should be part of a comprehensive assessment protocol, including other assessments such as the VB-Mapp as a companion assessment.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to:(1) List and describe the 5 domains areas covered by the PAL; (2) Describe at least 2 uses of the PAL and for whom it is suited; (3) Score the PAL across multiple domains for both initial program planning and on-going progress monitoring; (4) Describe how the PAL can be used to develop and monitor intervention programs; (5) Discuss the usefulness of the PAL as part of a comprehensive assessment protocol.
Activities: Workshop objectives will be met through a combination of lecture, discussion, guided practice, small group breakout, and video observation.
Audience: BCaBAs and BCBAs/BCBA-Ds working with infants, toddlers and/or preschoolers with autism spectrum disorder or other developmental disability or delay. Target audience are those whose responsibility it is to assess for initial program development and/or on-going progress monitoring.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
Keyword(s): assessment, infants, play, program development
 
Workshop #W4
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Sexuality and Safety for Individuals With Autism Spectrum Disorder and Developmental Disabilities
Thursday, May 25, 2017
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Convention Center 406/407
Area: AUT/DDA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Bobbie Gallagher, M.A.
BOBBIE GALLAGHER (Autism Center for Educational Services; The Chicago School of Professional Psychology)
Description: Recent research acknowledges that individuals with ASD are no less interested in sex than their peers but are often unaware of appropriate sexual interactions. Case studies will be reviewed to address issues such as the fear that addressing sexuality will increase awareness. Functional behavioral assessments should ensure that inappropriate sexual behaviors are not maintained by functions other than self-stimulatory and that interventions are based on the results. The audience will receive suggestions for teaching appropriate social interactions and safety skills to decrease exposure to possible abuse as well as avenues for teaching about sexual activity. Focus will be given to research in the areas of discrimination trials, social stories, visual supports and video modeling.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to:(1) describe recent research in the area of sexuality and individuals with ASD and DD; (2) describe supports needed to facilitate safe sexual behaviors; (3) describe interventions needed for inappropriate sexual behaviors.
Activities: This workshop is conducted using lecture, discussion and audience participation via answering questions that guide the conversation.
Audience: Intermediate to advanced BCBAs are the appropriate audience. Those with experience working with adolescents and adults.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): sexuality, masturbation
 
Workshop #W5
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Establishing Social Repertoires in Toddlers With Autism: The Nuts and Bolts of Teaching
Thursday, May 25, 2017
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Hyatt Regency, Mineral Hall G
Area: AUT; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Rebecca P. F. MacDonald, Ph.D.
REBECCA P. F. MACDONALD (New England Center for Children), PAMELA NICHOLE PETERSON (New England Center for Children), BRIANNA RACHEL HOLOHAN (The New England Center for Children), CAROLYN WALKER (New England Center for Children )
Description: It is widely known that Early Intensive Behavioral Intervention (EIBI) can produce large gains in social, cognitive, and language development in children with ASD, especially when treatment begins prior to their second birthday. The nature of EIBI requires that instruction be delivered throughout the child's waking day. As a result, both therapists and caregivers should be actively involved in the delivery of behavior-analytic programming. When therapists and parents work in coordination and take advantage of the many learning opportunities that arise in the natural environment, rates of skill acquisition increase as well as generalization and maintenance of skills. The purpose of the present workshop is to highlight key social skills (joint attention, social referencing, and play skills) to include in EIBI and to provide strategies for coaching and training both therapists and parents on the delivery of these services. A variety of exercises will allow participants to identify learning opportunities and practice developing and implementing treatment protocols. In addition we will present staff and parent training protocols and review data from our research on the efficacy of these procedures.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) describe the key social skills to include in an EIBI program for toddlers, children under 2 years of age; (2) describe strategies for training/coaching both therapists and parents to provide natural behavioral interventions; (3) identify opportunities for teaching in the natural environment and develop strategies for embedding instruction in these situations.
Activities: Lecture, Role-play, Guided practice, small group discussion
Audience: Intermediate
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): EIBI, Joint Attention, Parent Training, Social Skills
 
Workshop #W6
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Parent Training: One Size Does Not Fit All
Thursday, May 25, 2017
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Hyatt Regency, Centennial Ballroom A
Area: AUT/CBM; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Jessica R. Everett, Ph.D.
JESSICA R. EVERETT (Melmark New England), BARBARA O'MALLEY CANNON (Melmark New England)
Description: Applied behavior analytic services that are provided to children with autism spectrum disorders often include a parent training component. Parent training provides parents with needed skills to effectively manage their child's behavior as well as strategies for generalizing mastered skills. Additionally, parent training has been found to reduce stress related to parenting. Behavioral consultation that includes parent training may take the form of didactic or hands-on instruction, may be conducted either individually or in a group setting, and is typically focused on the acquisition of new parenting skills and knowledge. The present workshop will outline a continuum of parent training supports (e.g., parent education, behavioral consultation, individual and group based curriculum) and review variables that increase or decrease the likelihood that data-based treatment gains will be attained and generalized by parents. Outcome measures to discuss the efficacy of individualized parent training will be reviewed. Clinical strategies for effecting change in parents and families with complicated profiles will be presented. Data will be shared from pilot studies using the Incredible Years Parent Training Program and the Optimistic Parent Training Program.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) Identify a variety of evidence-based parent training interventions that are delivered individually, within multiple family members, and in groups; (2) Identify variables that increase or decrease the likelihood that parent training will be effective for individual families; (3) Identify individualized outcome measures to assess the efficacy of parent training.
Activities: Workshop activities include didactic instruction, discussion, review of case examples, and video modeling . Participants will have the opportunity to engage in small group activities that focus on collaborative problem-solving and decision making.
Audience: Individuals working with parents in home, school, or clinic-based settings such as psychologists, special education teachers, or behavior analysts.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Collaboration, Incredible Years, Optimistic Parenting, Parent Training
 
Workshop #W7
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Teaching Play Skills and Establishing Creativity in Children With Autism Spectrum Disorder
Thursday, May 25, 2017
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Hyatt Regency, Granite B
Area: AUT/DDA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Robert K. Ross, Ed.D.
ROBERT K. ROSS (Beacon ABA Services), JENNIFER SMITH (Beacon ABA Services)
Description: The purpose of this intermediate workshop is to train participants in the use of various strategies to teach creative play, through the use of visual supports. Creativity will be defined using behavioral definitions with an emphasis placed on planning for generalization. A variety of systematic strategies for teaching creative play using visuals will be reviewed with participants. Some of these strategies will include: Matrix training, Video modeling, Visual checklists and Picture Activity Schedules. Video modeling has been shown to be a successful teaching strategy in increasing pretend play skills in children diagnosed with autism (MacDonald, Sacramone, Mansfield, Wiltz & Ahearn, 2009), while matrix training has demonstrated successful results in teaching generalized language responses without direct teaching (Goldstein & Mousetis, 1989). Picture Activity schedules have also been used to foster independent play in children with ASD (MacDuff, G. S., Krantz, P. J., & McClannahan, L. E., 1993), This workshop will describe the expanded use of visual supports to facilitate generalization of materials, settings and play skills.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) Describe the deficits in children with ASD to rationalize a need for teaching creativity; (2) Identify the need to plan for generalization; (3) Describe matrix training and create a matrix for a pretend play activity; (4) Describe video modeling and one scenario in which to implement it; (5) Identify settings and occasions to use scenarios and learners to use them with; (6) Describe various forms and modalities of activity schedules and match them to individual learning styles.
Activities: Workshop objectives will be met through a combination of lecture, small group instruction, guided practice, and video observation.
Audience: Certified behavior analysts, graduate students, ABA practitioners
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Matrix Training, Play skills, Recombinative Generalization, Video Modeling
 
Workshop #W8
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Rules to Live By: Teaching Rule-Governed Behavior to Individuals With Autism Spectrum Disorder
Thursday, May 25, 2017
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Hyatt Regency, Mineral Hall E
Area: AUT/PRA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Jennifer Yakos, M.A.
JENNIFER YAKOS (Institute for Behavioral Training), CECILIA KNIGHT (Institute for Behavioral Training)
Description: Social skills instruction is a primary focus of many ABA intervention programs designed for individuals with ASD. While basic social skills targets may be effectively taught using traditional contingency shaped learning strategies, intermediate and advanced skills generally require the individual to learn and apply numerous rules to dynamic social situations that are constantly changing. This workshop will discuss and review evidence-based procedures to teach rule governed behavior to individuals with ASD, specifically regarding rules which relate to social norms, contexts and boundaries, as well as interpersonal behaviors involving perspective taking, conversation skills, and self-regulation. This workshop will include several case studies demonstrating rule governed behavior instruction, as well as practice opportunities to develop instructional strategies for teaching and applying rules.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) identify and review evidence-based procedures for teaching rules to individuals with ASD; (2) review and discuss examples of teaching rule-governed behavior across several different skill repertoires, including social skills, perspective-taking, and executive function; (3) practice developing instructional strategies to teach rule-governed behavior by incorporating evidence-based treatment protocols.
Activities: Workshop activities will include a combination of lecture, video demonstration, guided practice, small group practice and group discussion.
Audience: This workshop is appropriate for BCBAs, BCaBAs, educators, therapists, administrators, and other professionals involved in the development and implementation of treatment for individuals with ASD.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Autism, Social Rules, Social Skills
 
Workshop #W9
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
CANCELED: Intensive Social Skills Instruction and Inclusion Within a Preschool for Children With Autism
Thursday, May 25, 2017
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Hyatt Regency
Area: AUT/EDC; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Esther Bubb-McKinnie, M.S.
ASHLEE LAMSON (Elwyn), ESTHER BUBB-MCKINNIE (Elwyn)
Description: Section 2.09(a)of the Treatment Intervention/Efficacyof the Professional and Ethical Compliance Code for Behavior Analysts states, "Clients have a right to effective treatment."Research suggests the importance of early diagnosis and effective intervention for students with autism (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2014). Since Autism Spectrum Disorder is characterized by deficits in social communication skills, behavior analysts are faced with the responsibility of designing evidence-based, behavior-analytic interventions to facilitate social skills. Behavior analysts must also provide opportunities for children with autism to integrate with their typically-developing peers in the least restrictive environment (US Department of Education, 2015). Considering the lack of neurotypical students at Elwyn Seedlings, behavior analysts were charged with providing opportunities for the preschoolers to interact with neurotypical peers, while incorporating effective instruction to promote social skill acquisition. Thus, Seedlings administration created an Intensive Social Skills program in partnership with a neighboring preschool, which consisted of parent involvement, monitoring of treatment fidelity, tracking of student outcomes, and coaching and consultation. Content has obtained credibility, as demonstrated by the involvement of the broader practice, education, and science communities in studying or applying the findings, procedures, practices, or theoretical concepts. The presenters are salaried employees of Elwyn and Elwyn Seedlings.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) Identify each of the four components of the Intensive Social Skills program discussed during the workshop; (2) Define the Intensive Social Skills program design, philosophy, and curriculum; (3) Define and describe the data collection procedures implemented in the Intensive Social Skills program; (4) Outline the feasibility and sustainability of the Intensive Social Skills program relative to participants' professional settings; (5) State further applications of behavior analysis in relation to effective social skills instruction for children with autis; (6) State further applications of behavior analysis in relation to the effective implementation of inclusionary opportunities for children with autism.
Activities: Workshop objectives will be met through a balanced presentation of lecture, video observation, visual analysis of supplemental materials, and small group breakout discussion. Core content will be taught through lecture and video demonstrations of strategies will be provided. Group discussions will facilitate participants' understanding of group members' experiences relevant to the core content. Visual images of supplemental materials for assessment of student skills and staff fidelity of implementation will reviewed in order to support comprehensive participant learning.
Audience: BCBAs, administrators, educators, school personnel
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Autism Support, Preschool Inclusion, Structured Playgroups, Video Modeling
 
 
Workshop #W10
CE Offered: PSY/BACB — 
Ethics
Neurobehavioral Analysis of Epilepsy
Thursday, May 25, 2017
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Hyatt Regency, Capitol Ballroom 7
Area: AUT/DDA; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: John C. Neill, Ph.D.
JOHN C. NEILL (Long Island University)
Description: Up to 50% of individuals with severe developmental disabilities have epilepsy. Remarkably, behavior analysts are often unaware how epilepsy impairs their client's ability to learn and remember contingencies of reinforcement. In addition, persons with epilepsy often have behavior disorders which can be exacerbated by seizures. These seizures could be managed better, and important new life skills could be acquired, if their behavior analyst knew basic epileptology. This workshop will educate behavior analysts about epilepsy with a behavioral approach. The neuroanatomy, neurophysiology and molecular events responsible for seizures and seizure-induced impairments in learning and behavior will be briefly reviewed. The etiology, genetics and classification of various seizure disorders will be reviewed. Behavioral research on several animal models of seizures will be related to analog human studies. Many clients are improperly medicated for pseudo-seizures. EEG (electroencephalography) is a crucial test for accurate diagnosis of epilepsy, and participants will learn how to prepare a client for cooperating with this test, without sedation or anesthesia. Epileptic seizures dynamically modulate an organism's ability to operate on their environment. Conversely, the environment often modulates the frequency, intensity and duration of epileptic seizures. Behavior analysts will benefit their clients who have epilepsy by learning about these relationships. Dr. Neill's articles and publications can be viewed at https://www.researchgate.net/profile/John_Neill/contributions and https://scholar.google.com/citations?user=7LVjQ7MAAAAJ&hl=en.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will be able to: (1) Define an epileptic seizure; (2) Describe some of the developmental and neurological events responsible for epileptic seizures; (3) Recognize the importance of measuring the effects of seizures on learning and behavior; (4) Objectively describe, count and time seizures in relation to environmental conditions; (5) Recognize the importance of reviewing a client's history to determine etiology, and its particular impact on behavioral progress; (6) Recognize the effects of the environment on epileptic seizures; (7) Prepare a client for cooperating with EEG tests, without sedation or anesthesia; (8) Discriminate pseudoepileptic versus epileptic seizures; (9) Manage learning and behavior disorders effectively in clients with epilepsy.
Activities: Lecture and video presentations will alternate with discussions of key topics and audience questions and experiences regarding epilepsy.
Audience: Applied behavior analysts, special education teachers, psychologists and therapists who write behavior plans for individuals with developmental disabilities
Content Area: Methodology
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): autism, behavior disorders, epilepsy, seizures
 
Workshop #W11
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
How to Teach ABA Visually for Parents, Paras, and RBTs to Implement and Maintain Home or School Programs
Thursday, May 25, 2017
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Hyatt Regency, Capitol Ballroom 3
Area: AUT/PRA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Laura Kenneally, Ed.D.
LAURA KENNEALLY (Advance Learning Center)
Description: Students with autism often have a caring team consisting of their parents, a one-to-one paraprofessional in school, and RBTs at home who want to help them learn. Unfortunately, even with an ABA trained team, treatment adherence fails when the BCBA is not on-site. Why is this? Even simple ABA programs require large amounts of training and support from a BCBA in order to implement programs correctly. BCBAs have limited time to train and provide behavioral support. This results in well-intentioned ABA programs being implemented incorrectly, continued or worsening challenging behaviors, limited treatment integrity and parental adherence, and frustration for all involved. This workshop is a step-by-step simple curriculum to help a BCBA create a simple effective program which all staff and parents can implement. This program teaches the staff how to implement basic ABA programs using a visual training program. In addition, the student will be able to perform a range of skills from simple directions to complex communication, and independent activities. The student will learn to increase his attention span, markedly improve his following directions skills, all while simultaneously decreasing self-stimulatory behavior and other disruptive behavior including aggression and self-injurious behaviors using positive behavioral supports. In short, this simple easy ABA curriculum will help BCBAs effectively train staff to implement and maintain home and school programs.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) Determine and make environmental changes that reduce the need for behavior analysis services; (2)Identify the contingencies governing the behavior of those responsible for carrying out behavior change procedures and design interventions accordingly; (3)Determine and make environmental changes that reduce the need for behavior analysis services; (4)Use differential reinforcement; (5)Use discrimination training procedures; (6)Use prompt and prompt fading; (7)Use instructions and rules; (8)Use modeling and imitation; (9)Use shaping; (10)Use chaining; (11)Use incidental teaching techniques.
Activities: The format combines lecture, video examples, small group hands on activities and guided practice.
Audience: BCBAs, teachers, administrators, CST members
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W12
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Recent Research on Emergent Behavior: How to Get Started
Thursday, May 25, 2017
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Hyatt Regency, Granite A
Area: AUT/CSS; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: John W. Esch, Ph.D.
JOHN W. ESCH (Esch Behavior Consultants, LLC)
Description: In a review of observational learning, Townley-Cochran, J.B. Leaf, Taubman, R. Leaf, and McEachin (2015) state, "if the goal of intervention for individuals is to not only treat areas of deficit, but to establish a rate of learning that is similar to typically developing peers for certain individuals, learning through observation is a vital for these individuals" (p 269). Another review (Petursdottir and Carr, 2011) have questioned the traditional ASD sequence of instruction i.e., receptive targerts before expressive targets. They found little empirical evidence for such a sequence. Offering support, Delfs, Conine, Frampton, Shillingsburg, and Robinson (2014) found that emergent (untrained learning) was more probable through expressive training first than with receptive training first. And, Axe (2010) and Ribiero, Miguel, and Goyos (2015) used matrix training procedures to develop untrained emergent behavior. This workshop will present instructional procedures, instructional settings, and instructional sequences that may be instrumental in the development of emergent behavior. Participants will participate in the development of procedures and assessments for the occurrence of emergent behaviors.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1)describe changes to teaching sequences for ASD children recommended in recent reviews and reseach; (2)describe the importance of developing instructional procedures that focus on emergent behavior; (3)list 3 behavioral procedures that might be used to develop emergent behavior; (4)develop sample materials and data sheets for assessing the occurrence of untrained behavior.
Activities: Workshop objectives will be met throught lecture, keynote presentation, video instruction discussion, and practice developing simple instructionals materials and data sheets for assessing the occurence of emergent behavior.
Audience: The workshop is designed for BCBAs, BCaBAs with experience in providing direct instruction to persons with an ASD diagnosis and for persons who are responsible for the supervision of others providing direct instruction.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W13
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Medication and Applied Behavior Analysis: Best When Taken Together
Thursday, May 25, 2017
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Hyatt Regency, Centennial Ballroom E
Area: BPN/CBM; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Elizabeth Dayton, M.S.
ANNA MARIE DIPIETRO (Melmark), ELIZABETH DAYTON (Melmark), JENNIFER QUIGLEY (Melmark; The Chicago School of Professional Psycho), TIMOTHY NIPE (Melmark; Endicott College)
Description: In clinical practice, psychiatric practitioners and board certified behavior analysts (BCBA) often make changes to an individuals medication and behavioral treatment packages without much collaboration between the two disciplines. Integrated efforts in the fields of psychiatry and behavior analysis are sparse in both the research literature as well as within applied settings. The potential benefits of collaboration between psychiatry and behavior analysis include more complete designs to evaluate treatment effect and more in-depth measures of behavioral changes and side effects (Blum et al., 1996). Connor & McLaughlin (2005) found that multiple and complex medication regimens could be reduced in (1) a structured and therapeutic residential environment, (2) the use of best practice prescribing guidelines, (3) long lengths of stay. The Residential Treatment Facility (RTF) at Melmark specializes in the assessment and treatment of severe and treatment resistant challenging behavior for children with intellectual disability and co-morbid psychiatric/neurological disorders. Through collaboration between BCBAs and the prescribing psychiatric nurse practitioner, polypharmacy has been reduced by 36%. This workshop will focus on medication education and will suggest methods to facilitate communication between BCBAs and prescribers.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) understand classes of psychotropic medication, intended uses, potential side effects, and other considerations as applicable to clinical practice; (2) communicate effectively with prescribers, including presenting relevant behavioral data and engaging in meaningful and productive discussion; (3) utilize single-subject design in collaboration with prescribers to assess relevant behavior and medication effect.
Activities: Instructional strategies include: lecture addressing medication education and relevant background information by a prescriber; discussion targeting group experience and barriers to effective communication and collaboration; modeling of effective communication between the prescriber and behavior analysts; small group breakout sessions in which participants will role play effective communication with a prescriber with oversight by medication prescriber and behavior analysts; supplemental materials including a quick reference guide to medication information presented and handouts to guide practitioners in the discussion of relevant data with prescribers.
Audience: The target audience for this workshop includes BCBAs, behavior analysts, clinicians, and related practitioners who interact with medication prescribers including psychiatrists and nurse practitioners or anyone interested in learning about psychotropic medications, their use in applied settings, and how behavior analysis can enhance prescribing practices.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): ABA, collaboration, medication, pharmacology
 
Workshop #W14
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Treating Children With Behavioral and Emotional Disorders: Integrating Emotional and Moral Behaviors to Promote Generalization
Thursday, May 25, 2017
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Hyatt Regency, Centennial Ballroom H
Area: CBM/DEV; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Jeannie A. Golden, Ph.D.
JEANNIE A. GOLDEN (East Carolina University)
Description: Children that have been abused and/or neglected often exhibit behaviors that appear to be callous, unemotional, antisocial and immoral. Learning histories of these children affect their thoughts and feelings and these private events can serve as motivational operations. Using a contingency-based focus for managing children's behavior in a structured setting where staff follow-through with predictable contingencies does not prepare them to function in a generalized setting. The presenter will provide a behavioral explanation for the lack of emotional and moral behaviors and ways to develop effective behavioral treatments that are relationship-based, focus on emotional and moral skills, and promote generalization.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) describe how the learning histories of children that have been victims of abuse and/or neglect effect their emotional and moral behaviors; (2) explain why these children lack a repertoire for appropriate emotional and moral behaviors and how thoughts and feelings can serve as motivational operations; (3) describe the difference between contingency-based and relationship-based treatment approaches; (4) describe what environmental factors can encourage appropriate emotional and moral behaviors; (5) describe ways to develop effective behavioral treatments that are relationship-based and promote generalization.
Activities: Participants will listen to didactic information and real-life case histories in homes, schools and community settings, take notes, ask questions, view a power point presentation, present their own cases for feedback, and participate in role-play situations.
Audience: Participants would include board certified behavior analysts, psychologists, counselors, health care providers, social workers and/or teachers who serve children with developmental disabilities or children who are typically-developing who have emotional difficulties and/or have been given psychiatric diagnoses.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W15
CE Offered: BACB/PSY/QABA
Behavioral Relaxation: Training and Scale
Thursday, May 25, 2017
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Hyatt Regency, Mineral Hall C
Area: CBM/DDA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Victoria Stout Kubal, M.S.
VICTORIA STOUT KUBAL (California Consulting and Research Institute)
Description: Relaxation techniques are an integral part of the successful treatment of those exhibiting anxiety-related, pain-related, and/or anger-related behaviors. The sooner a client learns relaxation and other types of self-control techniques, the safer his/her internal and external environments may become. In addition, due to limitations in funding, providers must often demonstrate that extensive treatment progress has been made within a relatively short period of time. Poppen's (1998) Behavioral Relaxation Scale (BRS) is an assessment tool for measuring the progress of an individual demonstrating the 10 overt relaxed behaviors taught to criterion with Behavioral Relaxation Training (BRT). BRT can be an effective part of treatment for individuals with emotional/mental disorders, hyperactivity, schizophrenia, traumatic brain injury, physical limitations, and/or restricted cognitive/intellectual capabilities. This workshop will provide an opportunity to experience Poppen's (1998) Upright Behavioral Relaxation Training (URT) by means of labeling, modeling, imitation, practice, and corrective feedback. Once workshop participants are proficient in demonstrating URT and can verbally describe these 10 relaxed behaviors and corresponding examples of unrelaxed behaviors, they will be taught how to assess URT using the BRS.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) Position his/her own body in alignment with the 10 overt relaxed behaviors from Upright Behavioral Relaxation Training (URT); (2) Write a description of each of the 10 overt relaxed behaviors from URT in his/her own words and provide corresponding examples of unrelaxed behaviors; (3) Give another individual appropriate feedback so that the other individual can correct himself/herself according to the 10 URT postures; (4) Observe, record, and assess another individual's performance of the 10 relaxed behaviors from URT by accurately using the Behavioral Relaxation Scale (BRS).
Activities: Verbal Behavior: Listen to a presentation regarding the physiological effects of relaxation, the history of using relaxation training to treat psychological and physical disorders, and Poppen's (1998) development of Behavioral Relaxation Training and the Behavioral Relaxation Scale. Labeling and Modeling: View a live demonstration of the 10 postures included in Upright Behavioral Relaxation Training (URT). Each relaxed posture will be labeled, described topographically, and demonstrated physically. Modeling and Imitation: Learn how to breathe diaphragmatically, then imitate the other 9 relaxed behaviors of URT while viewing an instructor as model. After each participant has proficiently demonstrated each posture separately, he/she will practice relaxing all 10 areas at the same time. Feedback: Practice silently while the instructors are giving each participant individual corrective feedback. Later, workshop participants will form pairs and alternate practicing URT and giving each other corrective feedback. Criterion Tests: Take URT Written Criterion Test; score one another's criterion test. Take BRS Written Criterion Test; score one another's criterion test. Assessment: Behavioral Relaxation Scale (BRS) scoring methodology will be explained and demonstrated. All observers, including the instructor, will simultaneously score the BRS for the model.
Audience: The target audience for this workshop is comprised of practitioners who are certified by the Behavior Analyst Certification Board at the Doctoral (BCBA-D), Master's (BCBA), or Bachelor's (BCaBA) degree levels and who work with the following populations: clients with anxiety disorders, pain-related difficulties, or anger management problems; individuals who suffered a traumatic brain injury; individuals diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder, intellectual disability, or other developmental disabilities; persons exhibiting hyperactive or repetitive behaviors; clients exhibiting schizophrenic behaviors; and persons who experience an extreme amount of stress. Professionals with a strong interest in behavioral medicine, clinical behavior analysis, family and child therapy, and/or health and fitness training will also benefit from attending this workshop.
Content Area: Methodology
Instruction Level: Basic
Keyword(s): Mindfulness, Relaxation, Self-Control, Stress Management
 
Workshop #W16
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Brain Injury and ABA: Acquiring Skills to Manage Behavior
Thursday, May 25, 2017
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Convention Center 405
Area: CBM/BPN; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Michael P. Mozzoni, Ph.D.
MICHAEL P. MOZZONI (Mozzoni Associates LLC BCBA-Applied Neurobehavioral Services), DIXIE D. EASTRIDGE (Learning Services Neurobehavioral Institute)
Description: This workshop will focus on what behavior analysts can contribute to the rehabilitation of people with acquired brain injuries (ABI). Unlike other populations who are born with their impairments many persons with ABI had skills that were lost following their injuries. Re-teaching lost skills presents different challenges than teaching new skills. This workshop will present methods found in the behavioral literature to retrain social skills and manage behaviors. Participants will learn how to apply: mindfulness, fluency, discounting, and contingency management strategies to adults recovering from and living with ABI. Funding regulations regarding client rights will also be discussed as it applies to contingency management.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) discriminate differences between acute and post-acute behavioral presentations; (2)describe how to use fluency training to teach facial recognition of emotions; (3)identify human rights issues in relation to contingency management.
Activities: Lecture, small group break out to work on core content. Participant will be given instructional materials to practice fluency, discounting and mindfulness exercises.
Audience: Intermediate Skill Level. Teachers, rehabilitation professionals and behavior analysts who wish to expand their scope of practice are strongly encouraged to attend.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W17
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
The Matrix Project: Using Behavior Analysis to Promote Social Change
Thursday, May 25, 2017
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Hyatt Regency, Mineral Hall D
Area: CSS/PCH; Domain: Theory
CE Instructor: Molli Luke, Ph.D.
MOLLI LUKE (Behavior Analyst Certification Board; Behaviorists for Social Responsibility), TRACI M. CIHON (University of North Texas; Behaviorists for Social Responsibility), MARK A. MATTAINI (Jane Addams College of Social Work-University of Illinois at Chicago; Behaviorists for Social Responsibility), RICHARD F. RAKOS (Cleveland State University; Behaviorists for Social Responsibility), HOLLY SENIUK (University of Nevada, Reno; Behaviorists for Social Responsibility), JOMELLA WATSON-THOMPSON (University of Kansas; Behaviorists for Social Responsibility)
Description: Workshop participants will learn principles of behavioral systems theory and how they can be applied to analyze the systems that promote and hinder behavioral approaches to understanding and addressing societal issues (with a primary emphasis on issues outside autism/developmental disabilities). After a brief introduction to behavioral systems analysis, participants will actively engage in guided exercises, taking a constructional approach for analyzing and impacting large-scale social issues. Participants will learn to employ a matrix methodology for this purpose through hands-on exposure to an on-going, large-scale, evidence-based matrix project being conducted by the Behaviorists for Social Responsibility SIG (see www.bfsr.org for additional information about this project, which targets increasing the number of behavior analysts contributing to solutions to a range of social and global issues). Participants will then have opportunities to collaboratively select a cultural practice to be increased, and complete an analysis of antecedents and consequences likely to support or hinder the incidence of that practice. Finally, leaders and participants will discuss how this approach can realistically be used to promote social change in participants' areas of interest.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) explain how behavioral systems theory can be operationalized using a matrix methodology to promote social change; (2)locate and use empirical data to support behavioral systems analyses; (3)select a cultural practice for constructional increase, and complete an analysis of antecedents and consequences likely to promote and hinder the incidence of that practice; (4) apply this approach to promote social change in their own settings.
Activities: Introduction to behavioral systems analysis to promote social change, Small group exercises (verbal and charting),large group presentations,closing exploration of potential applications.
Audience: Graduate students, graduate level behavior analysts (BCBAs), and faculty members.
Content Area: Theory
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): behavioral systems, constructional approach, matrix methodology, social change
 
Workshop #W18
CE Offered: BACB/PSY/QABA
Learn to Play and Play to Learn: Integrating Verbal and Social Skills Instruction Into Common Play Activities
Thursday, May 25, 2017
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Hyatt Regency, Capitol Ballroom 4
Area: DDA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Jeffrey Skowron, Ph.D.
JEFFREY SKOWRON (Beacon ABA Services), SUZANNE SANDA (Beacon ABA Services/Beacon Assessment Center), BROOKE HYLAND LITTLETON (Beacon ABA Services)
Description: In this interactive workshop, we will identify and practice methods for teaching verbal behavior and adaptive social skills in the context of common games and play activities of toddlers and pre-school aged children. The presenters will provided an overview of the different developmental stages of play, as well as a review of empirically supported strategies for teaching play skills. We will then review the verbal operants, as well as age- and developmentally-appropriate social skill behaviors. With this foundation, the presenters will guide participants in identifying and modeling strategies for using common games, toys, and play materials to teach young children developmentally appropriate skill sequences. Special emphasis will be given to mand training and instruction in basic attentional and social skills (e.g., listening; joining in; sharing). Participants will have an opportunity to ask questions and receive feedback about ways of integrating this material into their current clinical work.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) identify and provide examples of different developmental stages of play; (2) identify appropriate social skills to target with instruction for young children; (3) identify the different verbal operants and provide examples of common topographies in young children; (4) develop and model strategies for teaching social skills to young children in the context of typical play routines; (5) identify and model strategies for teaching verbal behavior to young children in the context of typical play routines; (6) discuss strategies for applying skills and strategies from this workshop into their current clinical activities.
Activities: This workshop will includesmall- and whole-group activities, augmented with lecture and video models of concepts and techniques. Participants will have the opportunity to model skills in small groups using actual play materials. The workshop is Intermediate level, designed for early career or other BCBAs looking to expand their repertoire of skills related to teaching early skills to young children. Though the presenters work primarily with children diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder, the content is applicable to any child in need of instruction in verbal or social skills.
Audience: intermediate
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Play skills, Social skills
 
Workshop #W19
CE Offered: BACB — 
Supervision
Using Applied Behavior Analysis in K-12 Teacher Supervision, Training, and Professional Evaluation: Practice and Hands-on Application of ObserverWare Software
Thursday, May 25, 2017
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Hyatt Regency, Capitol Ballroom 5
Area: EDC/PRA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Thomas L. Sharpe, Jr., Ed.D.
THOMAS L. SHARPE, JR. (Educational Consulting, Inc.; ABA Therapy Solutions, LLC), JOHN KOPERWAS (Educational Consulting, Inc.)
Description: This workshop will provide hands on application of a data supported set of procedures for the description, analysis, feedback and goal-setting activities necessary to effective teacher supervision, evaluation, and training in K-12 teaching settings, and also in postsecondary professional practice environments. Workshop activities include (a) introduction to the importance of a behavior systems approach to teacher education, (b) hands-on observation system construction, and (c) data collection, analysis, and feedback activities designed for instructional and on-site practicum supervision purposes. Additionally, explanation and hands-on interaction with procedures designed for logically sequenced training activities are provided, including (a) classroom video observations, (b) on-site data-based assessment and immediate feedback and goal-setting, and (c) research and development into effective educational practice. Workshop participants will leave with a familiarity with behavior systems educational procedures designed for effective ongoing teacher supervision and professional education practice. Participants will be provided with a complimentary downloadable copy of the complete software tools,MS Wordfiles of all necessary illustration materials, and a PDF file of a summary copy of a compatible methodology textbook in relation to the procedures discussed as a function of workshop participation. Content has obtained credibility, as demonstrated by the involvement of the broader practice, education, and science communities in the study or application of findings, procedures, practices, and theoretical concepts. It is recommended that workshop participants bring their own IBM compatible laptop and/or aniPad to facilitate hands-on workshop interactions.
Learning Objectives: Workshop participants will exit with skills in the area of applied behavioral teacher supervision and professional teacher training. Skills include the ability to design observation systems that match with training objectives, construct video-based observational learning laboratory experiences, implement on-site data-based feedback and goal-setting experiences to determine if supervision and educational objectives have been met, and for those engaged in postsecondary professional education, develop a set of applied research activities to document the relative effectiveness of professional training activities. At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) discuss the principles and practice of applied behavior systems analysis in relation to teacher supervision and professional teacher training; (2) construct observation systems relevant to their particular professional teacher supervision and teacher training objectives; (3) design and implement video-based observational learning activities in relation to educational objectives for professionals in training and professional in practice; (4) understand and apply a range of computer-based data collection and analysis techniques in relation to recommended data-based on-site feedback and goal setting procedures; (5) develop applied research activities in relation to teacher supervision and professional teacher training objectives to determine the relative effectiveness of those efforts.
Activities: Workshop format combines lecture, small group and individualized activities, guided practice, and competency building exercises. Specific activities include: (1) Review of applied behavior systems analysis in relation to teacher supervision and professional training activities; (2)Hands on application of observation system construction designed as compatible with teacher supervision and professional training objectives; (3)Hands-on application of observational laboratory development in relation to the classroom instruction of relevant behavior analytic professional training objectives; (4)Hands-on application of data-based on-site feedback and goal-goal setting procedures in relationship to teaching practices of teachers on the job and teachers in training; (5) Introduction and review of recommended research activity development in relation to determining the relative effectiveness of recommended supervision and professional training activities.
Audience: K-12 lead teachers and administrators engaged in the ongoing supervision and evaluation of teachers on the job. Advanced graduate students and behavior analysts working in the area of professional teacher education in specific, and in the area of postsecondary training for professional competencies in general. Those working in postsecondary educational settings where focus is on the education, on-site training, and assessment of professional practice competencies, and who are challenged with how to teach, describe, and analyze highly interactive behavioral transactions that characterize education settings should find the workshop experience and complimentary materials particularly appealing to a wide range of professional training, assessment, and applied research applications.
Content Area: Methodology
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W20
CE Offered: BACB
CANCELED: Never Too Late for Sex Ed: A Behavior Analytic Opportunity to Build Your Sexual Knowledge
Thursday, May 25, 2017
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Hyatt Regency
Area: EDC/CSS; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Fawna Stockwell, Ph.D.
WORNER LELAND (Upswing Advocates), FAWNA STOCKWELL (Upswing Advocates)
Description: Sexual stimulation is a primary reinforcer, yet the discussion of human sexuality and sexual behavior is often overlooked or is a source of discomfort for many. Sexual education is often thought to be the burden of the school system, yet portions of American sex education continue to utilize curricula containing distorted information and basic scientific errors (U. S. House of Representatives Committee on Government Reform, 2004). This lack of affirming sex education has led to a population in which people of all ages may have a deficit in their sexual health knowledge. Because of this, their ability to consensually engage in informed sexual behavior is negatively impacted. This workshop provides a sexual education framework that centers consent, knowledge of the human body, sexual safety, and reinforcement-centric sexuality conceptualization. This workshop will equip attendees with scientifically accurate sexual health information that is affirming of all individuals, and will provide practice opportunities for conceptualizing and tailoring this information in ways which may benefit populations they serve. Empirically supported literature and data will be presented where applicable and available, and audience questions and discussion will be welcomed throughout the workshop.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will be able to: (1) state the key components of consensual sexual behavior; (2) describe the ways in which the human body's physical characteristics show variability across people; (3) apply strategies to select fact from fiction regarding scientific information on most common fictions specific to sexual health; (4) model the use of barriers used in safer sex practices, such as condoms, utilizing props.
Activities: Workshop objectives will be met through lecture, group discussion, modeling, and guided group practice. Supplemental sexual health and safety materials will be provided to support participant learning.
Audience: This workshop content is geared towards a general population audience and anyone who feels they may benefit from more comprehensive, behavior analytic sexual education; behavior analysts and other educators who have clients who may benefit from more comprehensive, behavior analytic sexual education; behavior analysts and other educators seeking behavior analytic content for sexual education.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
Keyword(s): consent education, human sexuality, sexual behavior, sexual education
 
 
Workshop #W21
CE Offered: PSY/BACB — 
Supervision
Part One: Effective Supervisors Do What It Takes! Improving Staff and Organizational Performance to Achieve Desired Client Outcomes
Thursday, May 25, 2017
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Hyatt Regency, Quartz B
Area: OBM/AUT; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Guy S. Bruce, Ed.D.
GUY S. BRUCE (Appealing Solutions, LLC)
Description: Do you work as an employee, supervisor, or director of an agency that provides services to clients with learning difficulties? Are you satisfied with your clients’ progress? Behavior analysis developed a powerful technology for helping people, but too many clients don’t receive the benefits. Why not? The easy answer is that employees don’t do what they are told. But the employees’ performance, just like their clients’ performance, is a product of their environment. Do employees have the resources, training, and management necessary to help their clients achieve their goals? What about their supervisors? What about their directors? Organizations are groups of individuals who must work together to provide their clients with the outcomes they want. The failure of clients to make adequate progress is not usually an individual employee performance problem, but a performance problem at the system process, and individual levels of the organization. This workshop will provide participants with a set of tools to pinpoint organizational performance problems, analyze their causes, recommend the best solutions, solve the problems by designing and implementing solutions that might include more efficient resources, training, and management practices, and evaluate their effectiveness, efficiency, and return on investment. Please note: This workshop takes place in three parts; attendees must complete all three parts to receive continuing education credits.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) define desired client results and necessary performance, then measure and evaluate current client results and performance, including measures of client progress called "celeration efficiency;" (2) define desired staff performance at the system, process, and individual levels; measure and evaluate current staff performance at each level; (3) perform a data-based analysis of staff performance problems to identify their causes; (4) recommend solutions to performance problems with the best return on investment; (5) design and implement those solutions, which may include staff resources, training and management; (6) evaluate the effectiveness, efficiency, and return on investment of those solutions.
Activities: This workshop provides a variety of training aids including case studies, practice cards, practice exercises, project worksheets, job aids, and computer-based charting software.
Audience: This three-part workshop is for supervisors, staff trainers, program designers, and directors of schools and agencies serving people with learning difficulties. Attend this workshop to learn the skills needed to ensure that employees are effective in helping clients achieve their goals! Earn a total of 12 CEUs by completing all three parts. (You may use 3 of these to meet the new BACB requirement for supervisors.)
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): celeration efficiency, improvement process, organizational performance, pragmatism
 
Workshop #W22
CE Offered: PSY/BACB — 
Ethics
Leadership in Behavior Analysis: How to Use Behavioral Science to Lead Ethically in Our Field
Thursday, May 25, 2017
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Hyatt Regency, Centennial Ballroom F
Area: OBM/PRA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Adam E. Ventura, M.S.
ADAM E. VENTURA (World Evolve, Inc.), ASHLEY TUDOR (BCBA)
Description: When considering leadership behavior in our field, several questions emerge, namely, What is leadership in behavior analysis? Why is it important, Who can lead others, and most importantly how do you shape the behavior of a behavior analysis leader? More specifically, how do you shape ethical leadership behavior? Identifying all of the elements that yield the ideal behavior analysis leadership mixture can be challenging. Leaders in our field are made up of a variety of different behavioral particles that if heated to the appropriate temperature can create a catalyst that brings out the best OR worst in their followers. But what is the appropriate formula for developing leaders and how can current leaders help energize their followers towards accomplishing the mission in an ethical manner? This workshop will provide answers to those questions and provide behavioral skills training on the intricacies of preparing to lead, leading others, and leading leaders in behavior analysis that will help grow your organization, achieve a high level of prominence within our field, and help to establish a long lasting (and positive) legacy for everyone at your organization.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) identify and define the definition of leadership in behavior analysis; (2) identify and execute steps for preparing to lead in behavior analysis; (3) identify and execute steps for leading others in behavior analysis; (4) identify and execute steps for leading leaders in behavior analysis.
Activities: Workshop objectives will be met through the use of behavioral skills training and precision instruction utilizing a combination of the following activities: 1. Instructor presentation and group discussion 2. Individual and small group activities 3. Individual and small group competency building exercises 4. Individual and small group fluency building exercises
Audience: Workshop target audience is ABA Managers, ABA business owners, ABA Supervisors, ABA program directors, ABA clinical directors, and ABA administrators.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Ethics, Leadership, LIBA, OBM
 
Workshop #W23
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Stimulus Control and its Relationship to Teaching, Prompting, Error Correction, and Errorless Learning
Thursday, May 25, 2017
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Hyatt Regency, Centennial Ballroom B
Area: PCH/AUT; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Andy Bondy, Ph.D.
ANDY BONDY (Pyramid Educational Consultants), ANTHONY CASTROGIOVANNI (Pyramid Educational Consultants)
Description: Behavior analysis can be succinctly described as the study of behavior under what conditions. That is, while the emphasis on behavior per se is novel to many people, the most unique characteristic of behavior analysis is the emphasis on how environmental conditions systematically influence behavior. In the study of operant behavior, not only did Skinner place emphasis on the role of consequences but his work also emphasized how the three-term contingency brings about stimulus control. Furthermore, an in-depth understanding of stimulus control may reduce the likelihood of engaging in ineffective, ritualistic teaching strategies. The first section will introduce critical nuances in the establishment of stimulus control, using examples from discrimination training. We will note that the definition of prompt is just as dependent upon behavior as is the term reinforcer. Next, we will focus in detail on the critical distinction between prompts and cues. The content will then focus on a major current aspect of most lessons, the removal of the prompts. Finally, we will focus on stimulus control and error-correction as well as various errorless teaching formats. We will use a variety of didactic strategies to review common teaching errors and practice identifying stimulus control issues within various lessons.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) describe stimulus control as defined within the laboratory and applied situations; (2) describe how stimulus control related to applied definitions of prompt and cue; (3) describe a variety of teaching strategies in terms of changes in stimulus control; (4) describe simple rules associated with prompt inclusion and removal; (5) describe how stimulus control relates to both error-correction strategies and errorless learning strategies within their own lessons.
Activities: Review standard definitions of stimulus control including the dependency between discriminative stimuli and behavior, review operational distinctions between the terms prompt and cue, review a variety of lesson formats and identify critical stimulus control issues within each lesson type (e.g., least-to-most prompt hierarchy, time delay, etc.), review video and case descriptions of a variety of teaching errors in terms of poor stimulus control, review various strategies commonly grouped as errorless-learning strategies, and review the difference between error fixing and error correction.
Audience: Anyone arranging lessons for a variety of learners in which prompts or shaping play a prominent role. This may include behavior analysts, speech/language pathologists, teachers or others involved with communication training with children and adults with disabilities including ASD.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W24
CE Offered: BACB/PSY/QABA — 
Ethics
Solving Ethical Dilemmas in the Practice of Applied Behavior Analysis
Thursday, May 25, 2017
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Convention Center 401/402
Area: PRA/DDA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Weihe Huang, Ph.D.
WEIHE HUANG (Creating Behavioral + Educational Momentum)
Description: This workshop is designed to increase participants' ability to ethically practice applied behavior analysis (ABA) by describing the characteristics of ethical dilemmas and discussing three tools that could be utilized to solve these dilemmas: core ethical principles in the ABA field, the Professional and Ethical Compliance Code for Behavior Analysts (the Code), and an ethical decision making model. When making ethical decisions, many behavior analysts tend to believe that these decisions are solely based on the analysis of objective data and relevant evidences. However, in reality the decision-making process is also influenced by behavior analysts' values, as well as societal values including those of services recipients. Behavior analysts often encounter ethical dilemmas when these values conflict. In the process of solving ethical dilemmas, the Code is helpful in many situations. In some cases, however, ethical dilemmas cannot be resolved by appealing to the existing guidelines or regulations. Part of this workshop is aimed at providing applied behavior analysts with ethical reasoning strategies in the event that the Code alone is insufficient. These strategies are based on the presenter's relevant experience of international as well as local practice and the available literature in the field of behavior analysis.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) Name two historical cases that led the field of behavior analysis to its current understanding of professional ethics and describe two differences between behavior modification practiced in 1970s and behavior analysis ethically practiced today; (2) List and describe at least five core ethical principles in the field of Applied Behavior Analysis;(3) Identify and describe at least three of the most common ethical dilemmas faced by behavior analysts; (4) Demonstrate a working knowledge in the Professional and Ethical Compliance Code for Behavior Analysts by being able to identify appropriate guideline(s) that could address a particular ethical issue; (5) Identify, define, and explain problem-solving strategies in a variety of ethical situations; (6) perform the Six-Step Ethical Decision Making Model and generalize the learned skill to different scenarios by completing 100% of the required steps described in the ethical decision making model for at least two new ethical dilemmas.
Activities: Activities: Instructional strategies for this workshop include lecture and targeted reading. In addition, this workshop will use cases both provided by the presenter and generated by participants to illustrate the implementation of the Professional and Ethical Compliance Code for Behavior Analysts and the steps in the Ethical Decision Making Model. Participants of this workshop will be encouraged to (1) identify their values and compare these values with primary ethical principles in the field of ABA; (2) recognize the characteristics of ethical dilemmas in the practice of ABA; and (3) apply the Professional and Ethical Compliance Code for Behavior Analysts and six steps specified in the Ethical Decision Making Model to cases that involve ethical dilemmas. The emphasis of the discussion will be on the application of the Professional and Ethical Compliance Code for Behavior Analysts and the Ethical Decision Making Model to various clinical settings, including natural homes, residential facilities, day programs, and educational programs.
Audience: The workshop level is intermediate. The target audience of this workshop include BCBA-Ds, BCBAs, BCABAs, RBTs, and behavioral service providers.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W25
CE Offered: PSY/BACB — 
Ethics
Molecular Functional Analysis: Ethical and Legal Challenges and Potential Solutions
Thursday, May 25, 2017
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Hyatt Regency, Capitol Ballroom 6
Area: PRA/AUT; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Michael Weinberg, Ph.D.
MICHAEL WEINBERG (Orlando Behavior Health Services, LLC; Amego, Inc; BEST Consulting Services), WILLIAM T. MARSH (Brevard Public Schools)
Description: In recent years the issue of conducting functional assessment vs. functional analysis has posed increasing ethical, legal and regulatory dilemmas for behavior analysts. Ethically, we are bound to conducting the most efficient, evidence-based assessment to find the function and other maintaining variables for problem behavior and devise a plan that is most likely to be effective based on the literature. However, there have been legal and ethical challenges to doing so in many states and jurisdictions and in various settings such as public schools, as well as via public funded services such as state departments of developmental disabilities. This presentation will review the main concerns regarding functional assessment and how these are presenting ethical and legal challenges to behavior analysts and some possible solutions to these dilemmas. The presenters will offer approaches to functional assessment and functional analysis including Molecular Functional Analysis which is based on use of trial-based systematic manipulations to reliably and validly identify function. These approaches can be readily implemented in applied settings and may serve as potential solutions to these challenges and permit for ethical, and evidence-based functional analysis methods in settings where these are not currently permitted or are considered an ethical/legal violation.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) Identify at least one main ethical concern being posed in various settings to the use of functional analysis ; (2) Identify two primary bases of legal challenges to functional analyses and explain the reasoning; (3) Describe alternative approaches to functional analysis that will permit for evidence-based methods, and may be acceptable ethically and legally in applied practice settings; (4) Identify how such an alternative will aid in maintaining BACB ethical standards.
Activities: Through the use of lecture and slide presentation, group discussion, practice vignettes, role play and guided practice exercises, and video clips, participant practice with assessment tools, participants will be actively engaged in learning processes throughout this workshop. Participants in this workshop will learn a new and unique method for functional assessment and functional analysis using our methods. Participants will be provided with supplemental materials including our assessment data collection tools and PowerPoint slides that present the methodology and logic.
Audience: Intermediate to Advanced audience. Participants should have training and experience with use of at least descriptive assessment methods and awareness of prevailing functional analysis methodology such as analog conditions (i.e. Iwata et. al., 1982/1994).
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Applied Settings, Ethics, Functional Anaysis, Regulatory Aspects
 
Workshop #W26
CE Offered: BACB/QABA
A Practitioner's Guide to Building a Customized Electronic Data Collection System Using Microsoft Excel
Thursday, May 25, 2017
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Hyatt Regency, Capitol Ballroom 1
Area: PRA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Cody Morris, M.A.
CODY MORRIS (Western Michigan University ), NEIL DEOCHAND (Western Michigan University), NATHAN VANDERWEELE (Western Michigan University)
Description: Electronic data collection is increasing in popularity within the practice of applied behavior analysis. With the growing use of paperless data collection systems, the skills to create or customize electronic data collection systems may be very beneficial to practitioners. This workshop will teach a simple skill set that will allow any practitioner to turn a Microsoft Excel spreadsheet into a functioning and mobile electronic data collection system. Components of this training will include how to (a) create a basic electronic data collection table with dropdown menus and autofill features, (b) create a timestamp for all data entered, and (c) create automatically graphing displays of data. In addition, security and compliance to regulations will be discussed. While participants do not need familiarity with Microsoft Excel to benefit from this workshop, a basic understanding of behavior analytic data collection procedures would be helpful. While it isn't required, participants should bring a computer (any operating system) with the Microsoft Excel program to participate in the guided practice.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) use Microsoft Excel and other free technology to create and modify electronic data collection systems; (2) collect and analyze data on the timeliness of data collection; (3)create graphs that automatically update to allow for instantaneous data analysis.
Activities: Workshop objectives will be met through a combination of presentation/modeling of the skill and guided practice.
Audience: Any practitioner with a basic understanding of behavior analytic data collection procedures. Familiarity with Microsoft Excel is not required.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
Keyword(s): Data Collection, Technology
 
Workshop #W27
CE Offered: PSY/BACB — 
Ethics
A Practitioner's Guide to Clinical Decision Making
Thursday, May 25, 2017
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Hyatt Regency, Mineral Hall F
Area: PRA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Erica Jowett Hirst, Ph.D.
ERICA JOWETT HIRST (Southern Illinois University, Carbondale)
Description: This workshop will provide an opportunity for practitioners (or soon-to-be practitioners) to enhance their clinical skill set by working through a variety of activities targeting appropriate skill selection based on the characteristics of an individual client (rather than as a progression through a list of skills), data-based decision making (going beyond the basics, troubleshooting), programming for generalization, and solving common clinical challenges. The content of this workshop is based on the clinical experiences and education of the presenter and is used for training second-year Master's degree students in an ABAI-accredited behavior-analysis program. Overall, participants will have an increased ability to think critically about the decisions they make in the practice of behavior analysis, which should lead to better outcomes for the clients they serve.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) select appropriate skills to target given an individual's age and level of functioning; (2) make decisions based on a set of data (e.g., when to discontinue a skill, change a reinforcer, change a prompt level or type of prompt); (3) program for generalization based on the conditions under which the skill was taught; (4) respond to challenging clinical situations that are common to the practice of behavior analysis.
Activities: All workshop participants will be guided through a workbook that targets skills such as goal selection, data-based decision making, programming for generalization, and problem solving. The presenter will provide instructions for each activity, then participants will work through the activities in the workbook, first individually, then the instructor will lead participants through a group discussion, during which participants can share their answers and receive feedback for the decision they made.
Audience: The target audience is graduate students and new practitioners (less than 5 years experience).
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): decision making, goal-setting, problem solving, programming generalization
 
Workshop #W28
CE Offered: BACB/PSY/QABA
A Progressive Approach to Discrete Trial Teaching: Some Current Guidelines
Thursday, May 25, 2017
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Hyatt Regency, Capitol Ballroom 2
Area: PRA/AUT; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Joseph H. Cihon, M.S.
JUSTIN B. LEAF (Autism Partnership Foundation), JOSEPH H. CIHON (Autism Partnership Foundation; Endicott College), RONALD LEAF (Autism Partnership Foundation), JOHN JAMES MCEACHIN (Autism Partnership Foundation), MITCHELL T. TAUBMAN (Autism Partnership Foundation), JULIA FERGUSON (Autism Partnership Foundation)
Description: Discrete trial teaching (DTT) is one of the cornerstones of applied behavior analysis (ABA) based interventions. Conventionally, DTT is commonly implemented within a prescribed, fixed manner in which the therapist is governed by a strict set of rules. In contrast to conventional DTT, a progressive approach to DTT allows the therapist to remain flexible, making in-the-moment analyses and changes based on several variables (e.g., individual responding, current and previous history). The instructors will 1) describe some guidelines to a progressive approach to DTT, 2) provide research, clinical data, and video examples of a progressive approach to DTT, and 3) provide opportunities for the participants to practice components of a progressive implementation of DTT.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) identify 8 guidelines to a progressive approach to DTT; (2) identify the disadvantages associated with a not adopting a progressive approach to DTT; and (3) identify considerations while training staff in a progressive approach to DTT.
Activities: Instructional strategies include a balance of: lecture, video observation, discussion, and guided practice.
Audience: Behavior analysts who have previous experience working with individuals diagnosed with autism or developmental disabilities and who have and have not implemented DTT.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
Keyword(s): autism, DTT, progressive ABA
 
Workshop #W29
CE Offered: BACB/PSY/QABA — 
Ethics
CANCELED: Marijuana, Client Abuse, and Coursework: Applying the Professional and Ethical Compliance Code for Behavior Analysts
Thursday, May 25, 2017
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Hyatt Regency
Area: PRA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Janet L. Montgomery, M.S.
JANET L. MONTGOMERY (ABA Technologies, Inc.; Florida Institute of Techn), CHRISTI A. REED (ABA Technologies Inc.; Florida Institute of Techno), EMILY MEYER (ABA Technologies Inc.; Florida Institute of Technology)
Description: Behavior analysts face dilemmas every day without obvious professional or ethical solutions. Practitioners have a science to help change behavior, but this isn't enough. Surrounding ethical contingencies must be considered when selecting the best course of action. The BACB's Professional and Ethical Compliance Code for Behavior Analysts provides an excellent resource. The code should guide decisions so that the best interest and well-being of the client is always prioritized. Application of the compliance code is not always clear-cut or easy, however, the code elements provide a backdrop for ethical decision making. Practice using the code will assist the practitioner in exploring appropriate options. This workshop will highlight a variety of real-life examples with identification of applicable code elements and options for resolution. Scenarios will include the areas of child welfare, traumatic brain injury, autism spectrum disorder, applied behavior analysis clinics, controversial medical interventions, supervision, and academic settings. Participants will have the opportunity to interact, discuss and apply code elements to existing workshop scenarios in addition to reviewing audience generated ethical challenges.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) identify ethical violations in a given scenario; (2) identify the applicable code element(s) from the Professional and Ethical Compliance Code for Behavior Analysts related to the scenario; (3) identify possible solutions or actions given an applied scenario; (4) discuss ethical dilemmas from personal clinical applications and related code elements.
Activities: The workshop includes lecture, discussion, small group breakout with opportunities for audience presentation.
Audience: This workshop is appropriate for practicing BCaBAs and BCBAs at all levels interested in additional BACB Code Practice.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Advanced
Keyword(s): BACB Code, Ethics, Scenarios
 
 
Workshop #W30
CE Offered: BACB/PSY/QABA
Inner Behavior: Changing Thoughts, Feelings, and Urges
Thursday, May 25, 2017
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Convention Center 403/404
Area: PRA/CBM; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Abigail B. Calkin, Ph.D.
ABIGAIL B. CALKIN (Calkin Consulting Center)
Description: Based on Skinner's writings and Lindsley's seminal work and research in identifying, counting, and analyzing inner behavior, this workshop looks at thoughts, feelings, and urges as behaviors that a person can observe, count, and change. It takes the participants on a journey to some of their own inner behaviors. It includes some charts of people who have counted inner behaviors in the past 50 years. The workshop reviews how to use the Standard Celeration Chart to record the frequencies and changes of any inner behavior.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) State the research background and their familiarity with research on observing and changing inner behavior; (2) Define thoughts, feelings, and urges and name specific examples of each; (3) Practice writing positive thoughts, feelings, and/or urges at 30-35 per minute or saying them at 50-75 per minute; (4) Count and record some specific inner behaviors for the duration of the workshop; (5) Develop a plan to change inner behaviors of self or clients.
Activities: The primary focus is to identify, list, count, record, and change inner behavior and to practice these skills. There is some information on the literature and successes of this technique. Participants can leave with a written plan for at least one client. The format is slide presentations with comments, and large and small group discussion.
Audience: Psychologists, clinical behavior analysts, parents and teachers of regular or special education children, including those with behavior disorders.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): celeration chart, inner behavior, PTSD
 
Workshop #W31
CE Offered: BACB — 
Ethics
The Business of Applied Behavior Analysis: Setting Up, Growing, and Maintaining Applied Behavior Analysis Businesses
Thursday, May 25, 2017
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Hyatt Regency, Centennial Ballroom G
Area: PRA/AUT; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Misty Jones, M.A.
PETER STURMEY (The Graduate Center and Queens College, City University of New York), ADRIENNE FITZER (The Applied Behavior Analysis Center, Inc. (ABAC)), MISTY JONES (Long Island ABA)
Description: Graduate training in Applied Behavior Analysis gives new professionals basic training in theory and skills focused mostly on working with individuals. Some people, however, desire or go on to set up their own business, an endeavor that requires new skills not taught at graduate school. The workshop will review some of the issues in setting up ABA businesses illustrated by two different companies. The first provides online continuing education and training and consultation services. The second provides ABA services mostly to children and adults with Autism Spectrum Disorders and Intellectual disabilities, their staff and families. The workshop will discuss the application of general ABA and organizational behavior management principles, such as data collection and analysis, modification of effort to increase recruitment to services in ABA businesses. The workshop will also identify common ethical challenges in the business of ABA and how to manage and resolve such challenges.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) list common challenges when first opening their own business, including business plans, hiring independent contractors and employees, health care law, insurance billing and state regulations; (2) describe the difference between being an independent contractor and a business owner; (3) identify key things a business owner needs to do at the inception of the business and the behavior that they must engage in to grow and maintain their new business; (4) identify common pitfalls and managing the risks; (5) describe how to diversify your business, expand your client base, develop your staff, reduce turnover; and (6) identify common ethical challenges in business and how to resolve them.
Activities: Instructional strategies include lecture, discussion, and small group work on case studies.
Audience: The target audience includes graduate level trainees in ABA and new practitioners considering or involved in setting up ABA businesses.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W32
CE Offered: BACB
CANCELED: Basic Statistics for Behavior Analysts
Thursday, May 25, 2017
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Hyatt Regency
Area: PRA; Domain: Theory
CE Instructor: Annette Griffith, Ph.D.
ANNETTE GRIFFITH (The Chicago School of Professional Psychology), JACK SPEAR (The Chicago School of Professional Psychology), CHRYSTAL JANSZ RIEKEN (The Chicago School of Professional Psychology)
Description: In fields such as psychology, education, and medicine, the majority of the research conducted involves group designs and statistical data analyses (Byiers, Reichle, & Symons, 2012). In many of these fields, statistical analysis is viewed as the gold standard for evaluation and interpretation of data (Sullivan, 2011). In contrast, a hallmark of the field of Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA) is the use of single subject research methods, that rely on visual inspection of the data (Kazdin, 2010). As a result, while knowledge and skill in single subject design methods is a key component in behavior analytic training programs and a necessary skill for certification (BACB, 2012), many behavior analysts may not have the skills necessary to accurately interpret and critically evaluate the literature outside the field of ABA (Shull, 1999). This may place behavior analysts at a disadvantage when assessing current knowledge, as many studies outside the field of ABA are very relevant for our clinical and experimental work. Therefore, this workshop will provide a basic overview of statistical analyses typically employed for group level designs. We will cover rationales for learning more about statistical analyses, review common statistical methods, and examine how these methods are presented in the scientific literature.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, participants should be able to: (1) describe reasons why it is beneficial for behavior analysts to be familiar with statistical analysis methods; (2) identify common statistical analysis methods used in related fields; (3) identify and interpret basic descriptive and inferential statistics in the context of research reports; (4) discuss methods for increasing statistical knowledge and familiarity in the future.
Activities: Workshop objectives will be met through a balanced presentation of lecture, guided practice, and group breakout sessions. Guided practice and group breakout sessions will incorporate project-based methods to facilitate engagement and comprehension (Shambare, 2011).
Audience: This workshop will be targeted towards clinicians with BCaBA and BCBA certification.
Content Area: Theory
Instruction Level: Basic
Keyword(s): data analysis, research, statistics
 
 
Workshop #W33
CE Offered: PSY/BACB — 
Ethics
CANCELED: Incorporating Cultural Consideration Tactics into Applied Practice
Thursday, May 25, 2017
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Hyatt Regency
Area: PRA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Noelle Neault, Ph.D.
NOELLE NEAULT (Simmons College)
Description: When providing clinical services, behavior analysts have an ethical obligation to address client-specific cultural factors that may impact treatment (BACB, 2014). Practitioner cultural awareness tactics include the detection of socially-mediated reinforcement or punishment contingencies (Hughes Fong, Catagnus, Brodhead, Quigley & Field, 2016). In order to increase training opportunities for practitioners, this workshop will present an overview of culturally sensitive considerations specific to behavior analytic service delivery. Content will include a review of proposed behavior analytic standards for cultural competence and recommendations for tactics to be incorporated into daily practice with clients (Hughes Fong & Tanaka, 2013). Additionally, case studies will be presented, followed by opportunities to practice selecting culturally sensitive tactics appropriate to the given case (Lynch & Hanson, 2011). Lastly, further recommended reading and resources will be shared.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) define cultural awareness; (2) describe examples of cultural factors that may impact service delivery; (3) describe culturally-sensitive tactics that could be implemented as part of assessment and/or treatment acceptability; (4) make recommendations for how to address potential treatment barriers associated with cultural factors when presented with a behavioral service delivery scenario.
Activities: The structure of this workshop will be as follows: lecture, case method of instruction with small group breakoutsand discussion. Primary content will be taught via lecture and guided practice with respect to decision making.
Audience: Intermediate
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): cultural competence, service delivery
 
 
Workshop #W34
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Using Motivational Interviewing to Enhance Caregivers' Cooperation and Application of Applied Behavior Analysis Interventions
Thursday, May 25, 2017
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Hyatt Regency, Granite C
Area: TBA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Monica Gilbert, M.S.
MONICA GILBERT (Crystal Minds New Beginning )
Description: Behavior Analysts who work with the Autism population often find barriers when attempting to provide parent training (PT). Although behavior analysts offer strategies and successfully change behaviors, it can be difficult for parents to adhere to treatment. A reason for parent's inability to follow treatment may be due to resistance. Resistance is defined as a private event that is evoked by an antecedent stimuli (clinician's verbal behavior), which is reinforced by escape of that aversive stimuli. Motivational Interviewing (MI) is an empirically proven intervention that has shown substantial success in the literature in changing addictive behaviors in substance abusers, medication adherence, and developmental disabilities. MI uses change talk strategies to increase cooperation and therefore decrease resistance. Thus, alterations in interactions between clinicians and parents can change parental private internal events. In this workshop, we will speak about private events as Skinner defined them and as they relate to MI strategies. We will also present the proven strategies of MI to decrease resistance and foster a collaborative working relationship between parents and clinicians. The Transtheoretical model (stages of readiness) will also be discussed as it relates to the momentary effects of motivating operations.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) Assess parent's motivation based on the trans-theoretical model and using different proven measures (2) Provide examples of effective change talk strategies to develop and build collaborative relationships with parents; (3) Describe motivation using private events (4) Identify traps that can harm clinician-parental relationships; (5) Describe key features of effective MI strategies; (6) Measure change talk vs. counter-change talk; (7) Identify key features necessary for cooperative relationships between caregivers and clinicians.
Activities: Workshop activities will include didactic instruction, small group breakout, guided practice and role plays.
Audience: BCaBA, BCBA, graduate students and Licensed psychologist
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
Keyword(s): autism, parent engagement, parent training, private events
 
Workshop #W35
CE Offered: PSY/BACB — 
Supervision
Ethics and Technology in BACB Supervision: Safe and Effective Practices
Thursday, May 25, 2017
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Hyatt Regency, Mineral Hall A
Area: TBA/PRA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Dana R. Reinecke, Ph.D.
DANA R. REINECKE (Long Island University Post; SupervisorABA), CHERYL J. DAVIS (Dimensions Consulting; SupervisorABA)
Description: Current training and supervision requirements of the Behavior Analyst Certification Board (BACB) require prospective BCBAs to receive supervision from trained supervisors. After the initial 8-hour training, supervisors are required to earn 3 CEUs in supervision skills every cycle. This workshop addresses specific supervision skills related to the BACB's Compliance Code (implemented as of 2016), with particular attention to the use of technology in the implementation of evidence-based supervision practices. Distance supervision is a common practice in the field, and relies increasingly on various forms of technology, which may or may not meet ethical requirements for confidentiality, privacy, and effective teaching and training. Participants will learn about how the Compliance Code applies to their practice in providing supervision, and how they may use technology safely and effectively to facilitate both distance and face-to-face supervision. A variety of applications of technology will be discussed and practiced during the workshop. This training program is based on the BACB Supervisor Training Curriculum Outline but is offered independent of the BACB.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) discuss and implement the Compliance Code with regard to the use of evidence-based practices in supervision; (2) describe the ethical implications of using various forms of technology in supervision, as per the Compliance Code; (3) implement the use of at least two applications of technology to the practice of effective supervision.
Activities: Instructional strategies include lecture, discussion, whole-group demonstrations of technology, and small-group breakouts to practice specific applications of technology. Objectives will be described through lecture and discussed and demonstrated with the group as a whole. Small groups will be formed based on common interests and needs, and workshop facilitators will work with each group to practice developing and using supervision strategies to meet learning objectives on an individual level.
Audience: Target audience is BACB supervisors who have completed an 8-hour supervision training.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Advanced
Keyword(s): ethics, supervision, technology
 
Workshop #W36
CE Offered: BACB/PSY/QABA
CANCELED: Verbal Behavior and Using VB Programming and Competency Checklists in Developing Communication Skills With Adults
Thursday, May 25, 2017
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Hyatt Regency
Area: VRB/PRA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Vivian A. Attanasio, M.S.
AMANDA DUVA (Services for the Underserved), VIVIAN A. ATTANASIO (Services for the Underserved), AMY RACHEL BUKSZPAN (Services for the Underserved)
Description: Skinner's 1957 analysis of verbal behavior suggests that language is behavior and functional language, or lack thereof, is directly related to problem behaviors. Though there is a robust pool of research and review of teaching practices with children, evidence-based programming are lacking in the use of typical VB techniques in working with adults with developmental disabilities. Working with an older population who retain a long history of previously learned and reinforced behaviors, and who now engage in multifaceted relationships calls for not only the use of basic teaching techniques, but also demands for more complex programming to address abstract and advanced needs. The workshop will apply the theory to practice by reviewing several cases of varying-level learners, discussing the obstacles faced for each of these individuals, and how the team was able to utilize the principles of ABA and VB to guide the teaching of communication skills. The group will then practice these methodologies together using the Behavioral Skills Training Model.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (a) Describe the Verbal Operants as they relate to functions of behavior; (b) Conduct a manding session with an individual with basic pre-requisites; and (c) Describe and complete a competency checklist on mand training; (d) Identify methodologies utilized in developing communication programs for adults.
Activities: This workshop will include a lecture, data review of several case studies, and introduction of tools used by the authors for training purposes. Small group breakout periods and immediate feedback will occur to facilitate acquisition of identified skills.
Audience: BCBAs, BCaBAs, RBTs and clinicians working with children and adults who demonstrate communication deficits.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
Keyword(s): competency checklist, developmental disabilities, manding, verbal behavior
 

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