IT should be notified now!

Association for Behavior Analysis International

The Association for Behavior Analysis InternationalĀ® (ABAI) is a nonprofit membership organization with the mission to contribute to the well-being of society by developing, enhancing, and supporting the growth and vitality of the science of behavior analysis through research, education, and practice.

Search
Donate to SABA Capital Campaign
Portal Access Behavior Analysis Training Directory Contact the Hotline View Frequently Asked Question
ABAI Facebook Page Follow us on Twitter LinkedIn LinkedIn

44th Annual Convention; San Diego, CA; 2018

Event Details

Previous Page

 

Symposium #31
CE Offered: BACB
Managing Generative Processes in the Development of Early Verbal Behavior Repertoires
Saturday, May 26, 2018
10:00 AM–11:50 AM
Manchester Grand Hyatt, Seaport Ballroom G
Area: AUT/VRB; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Sara Garbarini, M.Ed.
Chair: Kalle M Laitinen (Personalized Accelerated Learning Systems)
Discussant: Sarah A. Lechago (University of Houston-Clear Lake)
Abstract: The purpose of this symposium is to present data that suggests how clinicians might best organize their programming to produce generative effects in their learners. The first study, Revisiting Verbal Behavior Development: A Two Year Follow Up, is a two-year follow up presentation of a young learner who scored in low level I of the VB-MAPP -- without an echoic repertoire -- and is currently learning relational intraverbals such as the deitics (here/there, I/you), ordinals (first, middle, last) and Crels such as "name/sound". The second study, Establishing Stimulus Control Over Echoic Behavior to Teach the Mand, discusses implementing procedures to effect stimulus transfer control across Mand types. The third study, Teaching Learners Who Use a Speech Generator Device to Mand for Information-Asking Questions About Hidden Objects, is about teaching children who use a speech generator device, to ask questions. The fourth study, Decreasing Echolalic Responses by Teaching a Conditional Response to the Autoclitic OR When Differentially Tacting From Two Options, presents data on a procedure to increase comprehension and decrease echolalia by teaching the appropriate control of the autoclitic "or" to establish differential tacting of available choices. These four studies illustrate different aspects of the organization and management of programming to produce generative speaker/listener competencies.
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience: This symposium has been designed for intermediate level professionals. Preferably for an audience of graduate ABA professionals. Professionals at the undergraduate level will greatly benefit too.
Learning Objectives: 1. Clinicians will learn to organize their programming to produce generative effects in their learners. 2. Clinicians will see examples as to how to produce generative speaker/listener competencies 3. Clinicians will be exposed to a variety of interventions to solve various problems
 
Revisiting Verbal Behavior Development: A Two Year Follow Up
Jessica Fernandez (Fit Learning Aptos), Richard E. Laitinen (Peronalized Accelerated Learning Systems), SHUBHRA GHOSH (Educational and Developmental Therapies, Inc.)
Abstract: This paper is a two year follow up presentation of a six-year old learner who scored in low level I of the VB-MAPP, and initially did not have an echoic repertoire. His first year of progress was presented at the 2017 ABAI conference. In his second year of therapy the learner made significant gains in all verbal behavior repertoires: tacts, intraverbals, mands and echoics and his listener skills improved as well, positively impacting social skills. His language is becoming more fluent and his mean utterances has increased too. He is beginning to interact more in his natural environment as he independently reads books, plays with puzzles, is beginning to build more complex structures with wooden blocks, indicating that his nonverbal imitation is improving too. He is currently learning relational intraverbals such as (here/there, I/you), ordinals (first, middle, last) and Crels such as "name/sound.? Further relations, such as comparatives, spatials and temporals will be addressed as programming progresses.
 
Developing a Vocal Manding Repertoire: Establishing Stimulus Control Over Echoic Behavior to Teach the Mand
CHARLENE GERVAIS (Portia Learning Centre; Porita International)
Abstract: Many children with autism do not have an established echoic repertoire. Imitating vocalizations is an important skill for learning to vocally mand. Pairing procedures have been shown to increase vocalizations in some limited research studies, however, there is no evidence to suggest that pairing words with reinforcement reliably establishes echoic behavior. We examined the use of two procedures to establish echoic stimulus control and eventually establish a manding repertoire using stimulus control transfer procedures across verbal operants. We were successful in establishing vocal manding with the participant, a young boy with autism. Both procedures used direct reinforcement for echoic behavior, however, the second procedure included the use of visual cues. Establishing stimulus control over echoic behavior led to an increase in mand and tact repertoires. Results suggest that stimulus control transfer procedures across verbal operants, combined with careful analysis of current skills and barriers may increase success when attempting to establish vocal verbal behaviour. More research is needed to identify which procedures or combination of procedures are most effective for certain profiles.
 
Teaching Learners Who Use a Speech Generator Device to Mand for Information-Asking Questions About Hidden Objects
SARA GARBARINI (David Gregory School ), Maria DeMauro (David Gregory School)
Abstract: This study investigated if learners using a speech-generator device (SGD) could learn to mand for information, asking questions about hidden objects. We replicated the study by Williams, Perez-Gonzalez & Vogt (2003) with four learners who attended a program for children with special needs and who used the SGD but never used it to mand for information. The results indicated that learners can learn to use the SGD to ask questions when taught under the appropriate conditions of deprivation and systematic fading of textual and model prompts. We also measured generalization to untaught objects across settings.
 
Decreasing Echolalic Responses by Teaching a Conditional Response to the Autocliticor When Differentially Tacting From Two Options
GLADYS WILLIAMS (Centro para la Investigacion y Ensenanza del Lenguaje), Sara Garbarini (David Gregory School ), Goldean Lowe (IMUA Family Services, Maui, Hawaii), Monica Rodriguez Mori (Centro para la Investigacion y Ensenanza del Lenguaje), Kenya Velazquez (Centro Altum)
Abstract: It is common for children who present with a dominant echolalic repertoire to respond with an echoic when presented with an autoclitic form of instruction requesting a tact or mand-response, as in, for example, "Is this an apple or an orange?" or "Would you like to eat cake or spinach?" The current study analyzed the effectiveness of a procedure that incorporated already established tacting, matching and reading repertoires to increase differential tacting based on an "or" relation between two options. We measured if this acquired skill decreased echolalia and generalized to untrained settings. The data suggested that the learners in this study learned to tact differentially from two options that were presented with the autoclitic. We also measured if the acquired skill generalized to natural settings.
 

BACK TO THE TOP

Ā 

Back to Top
Modifed by Eddie Soh
SABA DONATE ABAI HOTLINE