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Association for Behavior Analysis International

The Association for Behavior Analysis International® (ABAI) is a nonprofit membership organization with the mission to contribute to the well-being of society by developing, enhancing, and supporting the growth and vitality of the science of behavior analysis through research, education, and practice.

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44th Annual Convention; San Diego, CA; 2018

Event Details

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Symposium #236
CE Offered: BACB
Increasing Social Initiation Skills and Play Skills for Children Diagnosed With Autism
Sunday, May 27, 2018
11:00 AM–11:50 AM
Manchester Grand Hyatt, Grand Hall B
Area: AUT/PRA; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Jessica Ann Korneder, Ph.D.
Chair: Kelly Kohler (Western Michigan University)
Discussant: Jessica Ann Korneder (Oakland University)
Abstract: A diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) typically presents with deficits in communication, socialization, and play. This presentation aims to address the effects of systematic instruction aimed to increase social initiations during shared book reading and pretend play skills of young children with ASD. Results of the independent studies indicate that systematic instruction and reinforcement of targeted behaviors within pretend play and book reading activities can increase participation and skill repertoire. In one study, the effectiveness of an intervention to increase independent initiations of three young children with ASD during shared book experiences was examined using the multiple probe design. The intervention resulted an increase in verbal responses to adult initiations and children's independent verbal commenting with pointing to direct the adult's attention to an image in the shared book. Findings suggest that children with ASD can independently initiate and respond during shared book experiences when behaviors are systematically taught and reinforced. In a separate study, changes in toy selection, during a multiple stimulus without replacement (MSWO) preference assessment, were targeted by teaching pretend play skills with a task analysis, the use of direct reinforcement, and stimulus-stimulus pairing procedures. Results indicate that exposure to toys and teaching a child how to play with the toy have an effect on the preference for that toy.
Instruction Level: Basic
Keyword(s): autism, pretend play, shared reading, task analysis
Target Audience: Practicing BCBAs
 
The Use of a Task Analysis, Direct Reinforcement, and Stimulus-Stimulus Pairing on Pretend Play Skills
Jessica Ann Korneder (Oakland University), JAMES CHARLES BLEVINS (Oakland University)
Abstract: Children diagnosed with autism are known to have behavioral deviations in play. Children diagnosed with autism often participate in stereotypy rather than appropriate play due to a small repertoire of reinforcers (Koegel, Firestone, Kramme & Dunlap, 1974). Research regarding play skills has discovered that new choices can be conditioned through stimulus-stimulus pairing (Nuzzolo-Gomez, Leonard, Ortiz, Rivera & Greer, 2002). Egel (1981), found that children diagnosed with autism frequently struggle with motivation for educational activities. Children with a variety of reinforcers are more motivated, on-task, and have less satiation than when offered unchanging reinforcement. This suggests that if a child with autism does not have a large repertoire of reinforcers, she will be easily satiated on few preferred items and progress can stagnate. In the current study changes in toy selection, during a multiple stimulus without replacement (MSWO) preference assessment, were targeted by teaching pretend play skills with a task analysis, the use of direct reinforcement, and stimulus-stimulus pairing procedures. Results indicate that exposure to toys and teaching a child how to play with the toy have an effect on the preference for that toy. The pairing procedure shows inconsistent results.
 
Increasing Child Initiations During Shared Reading Experiences: An Intervention for Preschoolers With Autism Spectrum Disorder
SOPHIA R. D'AGOSTINO (Michigan State University), Josh Plavnick (Michigan State University)
Abstract: Children diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder demonstrate delays in early social interaction skills, such as responding to and initiating interactions with others (Freeden & Koegel, 2006). The effectiveness of an intervention to increase independent initiations of three young children with ASD during shared book experiences was examined. Using the multiple probe design, children's responses and initiations with a social partner were measured during baseline, intervention, and mastery sessions with generalization probes to novel books occurring during each phase. The intervention resulted an increase in verbal responses to adult initiations and children's independent pointing and verbal commenting to direct the adult's attention to an image in the shared book. Findings suggest that young children with ASD can independently initiate and respond during shared book experiences across various books when behaviors are systematically taught and reinforced. Future research should investigate effects of the current intervention combined with shared reading interventions aimed to increase early literacy skills in young children with ASD.
 

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