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Association for Behavior Analysis International

The Association for Behavior Analysis International® (ABAI) is a nonprofit membership organization with the mission to contribute to the well-being of society by developing, enhancing, and supporting the growth and vitality of the science of behavior analysis through research, education, and practice.

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44th Annual Convention; San Diego, CA; 2018

Event Details

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Symposium #35
CE Offered: BACB
Effects of English and Spanish Languages on Responding: Cultural Accommodations for Learners With Disabilities
Saturday, May 26, 2018
10:00 AM–11:50 AM
Manchester Grand Hyatt, Seaport Ballroom DE
Area: DDA/VRB; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Rocio Rosales, Ph.D.
Chair: Casey J. Clay (University of Missouri)
Discussant: Rocio Rosales (University of Massachusetts Lowell)
Abstract: Effective accommodations for bilingual learners with disabilities are needed in the field of behavior analysis. This symposium includes four studies on how English and Spanish language influences responding, and the accommodations practitioners make to be more effective with bilingual learners with disabilities. This symposium will give the audience tools and techniques to apply in practice with bilingual learners. The purpose of the first study was to assess the influence of language preference among individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) or other intellectual disorders who have been exposed to more than one language. This study evaluated language preference during play contexts followed by evaluating language preference within instructional contexts and the individual�s compliance with instructions. In the second study, researchers developed a questionnaire for behavior analysts to use as a guide when choosing culturally adapted functional communication response (FCR) for Hispanic children. It was devised and pre-tested to choose FCRs for Hispanic families. Results from the questionnaire and feedback from the experience survey will be presented. The third study builds off the previous study by using the questionnaire identify an FCR that matched cultural values. The subjects were taught to emit a culturally adapted and non-culturally adapted FCR. Parents� preference for each FCR was evaluated after they were trained to implement both FCR responses. Finally, implementation of the preferred FCR was carried out by parents. The final study compared skill acquisition of Spanish-language-dominant caregivers during behavioral skills training (BST) to teach differential reinforcement, guided compliance, and BST by English and Spanish speaking therapists. In the English condition a translator was used, for the Spanish condition a bilingual therapist administered the BST. Rates of acquisition were compared and a social validity survey was administered to the caregivers. Implications of these studies on the practice of behavior analysis will be discussed.
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Communication training, Language accomodation, Language preference, Spanish Language
Target Audience: Students, researchers, and practitioners.
 
The Effects of Language Preference Among Bilingual Individuals With Autism Spectrum Disorder and Other Intellectual Disabilities
KARLA ZABALA (University of Georgia), Kara L. Wunderlich (University of Georgia)
Abstract: Previous research has demonstrated that individuals with ASD who have been exposed to more than one language do not experience any additional language delays compared to their monolingual peers (Hambly and Fombonne, 2011), and of previous studies that have been reviewed, there has been no indication of negative outcomes associated with language abilities among bilingual/multilingual children with ASD (Drysdale et al., 2015). A majority of the research surrounding bilingual or multilingual individuals diagnosed with autism or other developmental disabilities have focused more on conducting communication assessments to assess participant's psychometric performance in these assessments but research on language preferences alone among these individuals is scarce. The purpose of the current study was to assess the influence of language preference among individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) or other intellectual disorders who have been exposed to more than one language. The research study consists of two parts: Study 1 evaluates language preference during play contexts and study 2 evaluates language preference within instructional contexts and the individual's compliance with instructions.
 
Adapting Functional Communication Responses to Parents’ Cultural Values: A Questionnaire
MARLESHA BELL (University of South Florida), Anna Garcia (University of South Florida), Sarah E. Bloom (University of South Florida), Claudia Campos (University of South Florida)
Abstract: The guidelines to conduct functional communication training (FCT) state that functional communication responses (FCRs) should be of low response effort, easily acquired, and easily recognizable by the community (Tiger et al., 2008). They also state that FCRs should be socially significant, meaning they are found acceptable by parents and the community. However, the guidelines do not mention the need to consider the clients’ cultural background when choosing an FCR. In this study, a questionnaire was developed for behavior analysts to use as a guide when choosing culturally adapted FCRs for Hispanic children. It was devised using literature that has identified specific behavioral manifestations of cultural values among the Hispanic population. Additionally, behavior analysts and parents who pre-tested the questionnaire completed experience surveys about their opinions and experience using the questionnaire to choose FCRs for Hispanic families. Results from the questionnaire and feedback from the experience survey will be further discussed.
 
Culturally Adapted Functional Communication Training
ANNA GARCIA (University of South Florida), Sarah E. Bloom (University of South Florida), Claudia Campos (University of South Florida), Jennifer Rebecca Weyman (University of South Florida), Marlesha Bell (University of South Florida)
Abstract: Disparities in the use, quality, and outcomes of treatments, and the barriers that deter Hispanics from receiving healthcare services have been widely studied. Yet, similar efforts have been slow in the field of Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA). A way to decrease treatment disparities is to assess the influence of cultural variables in behavior analytic interventions, and to evaluate whether manipulations to these variables improve the overall results of the interventions among Hispanic families. During this study, behavior analysts used a questionnaire to conduct an interview with parents to identify a functional communication response (FCR) that matched their cultural values. The subjects were taught to emit a culturally adapted and non-culturally adapted FCR. Parents preference for each FCR was evaluated using a multiple-baseline design across participants in which they were trained to implement both FCR responses. At the end of the study, parents implemented the FCR of their choice. These results have important implications for ABA because it will support research in assessing cultural variables in interventions and services, and it will encourage behavior analysts to consider their clients culture when providing services.
 
An Evaluation of Culturally-Based Accommodations for Behavioral Skills Training
JULIANA HOYOS (University of Missouri), Casey J. Clay (University of Missouri), Emma Keicher (Thompson Center for Autism and Neurodevelopmental Disorders), Miriam Tye (Thompson Center for Autism and Neurodevelopmental Disorders), Jayme Murphy (University of Missouri)
Abstract: The purpose of this project was to evaluate cultural accommodations (bilingual clinician, translated documentation) and a lack of cultural accommodations (English speaking clinician with video interpreter). We compared skill acquisition of caregivers during behavioral skills training (BST) program for differential reinforcement, guided compliance, and BST with and without cultural accommodations. We found BST with improved cultural accommodations was more effective than without cultural accommodations.
 

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