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Association for Behavior Analysis International

The Association for Behavior Analysis International® (ABAI) is a nonprofit membership organization with the mission to contribute to the well-being of society by developing, enhancing, and supporting the growth and vitality of the science of behavior analysis through research, education, and practice.

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Ninth International Conference; Paris, France; 2017

Event Details

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Paper Session #57
Topics in Autism: Parent Experiences and Training
Wednesday, November 15, 2017
8:00 AM–9:50 AM
Scene C, Niveau 0
Area: AUT
Chair: Jonathan Sailer (Rochester Center for Autism)
CANCELED: Parent Experience of Stigma Following Early Autism Diagnosis: A Comparative Study Between Massachusetts and Central Scotland
Domain: Theory
RUTH ELIZABETH GLYNNE-OWEN (University of Edinburgh Blue Sky Autism Project)
Abstract: There are a number of studies looking at parent experience of stigma in autism. Previous research has shown that parents and immediate family members experience direct and indirect stigma following their child's autism diagnosis and this is almost always linked directly to observable behaviour from the child. Behaviours are regarded as socially different and often socially unacceptable and parents report strong feelings of stigma because of these. In this study the researcher used interview data from 18 families in both Massachusetts and Central Scotland and compared their perceptions of stigma and perceptions of autism. The findings showed that parents in this sample group held largely negative perceptions of autism before their child's diagnosis. However, after diagnosis perceptions of autism and of their child changed. No parent in this study reported experiencing stigma post diagnosis. This was an unusual finding given the previous literature in this field and one that merits further exploration.
 
Training Parents in Saudi Arabia: Assessing Learning From Doing and Learning From Seeing
Domain: Applied Research
ALANOUD AL SAUD (Center For Autism Research at King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Center , Riyadh ), Ahmad Khamis Eid (Center For Autism Research at King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Center, Riyadh ), Sultana Asfahani (Center For Autism Research at King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Center, Riyadh ), Ohud Alhaqbani (Center For Autism Research at King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Center, Riyadh ), Mashail AlAql (Center For Autism Research at King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Center, Riyadh ), Hesham Aldhalaan (Center For Autism Research at King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Center, Riyadh ), Rafat Mohtasib (Center For Autism Research at King Faisal Speciali), Mitch Fryling (California State University, Los Angeles)
Abstract: A considerable amount of attention has been given to parent training efforts in Applied Behavior Analysis. Still, much remains to be learned, including the extent to which common training protocols are effective with a diverse range of individuals and are viewed as socially valid in different cultural contexts. The present study trained six parents of children with Autism Spectrum Disorder to implement the Natural Language Paradigm in Saudi Arabia. Three of the parents received training using a Behavioral Skills Training model involving instructions, modeling, rehearsal, and feedback. All three of the participants who were taught using this protocol learned to implement the intervention effectively. As each parent was being trained individually, an additional parent observed the training (i.e., there were three observer-trainee dyads). While all of the parents learned from observing other parents being trained directly, only one observer parent met the predetermined performance criteria, with the other two reaching criteria after being trained directly. All six parents demonstrated maintenance of their skills at follow-up, and indicated that they enjoyed and training and learned a lot from it. Moreover, parents indicated that their childs behavior improved at home, suggesting strong social validity. Implications for further training research are provided.
 
Training Parents in Saudi Arabia to Implement Discrete-Trial Teaching With Their Children With Autism Spectrum Disorder
Domain: Applied Research
Ahmad Khamis Eid (Center For Autism Research at King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Center, Riyadh), AlAnoud Al Saud (Center For Autism Research At King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Center, Riyadh ), Sultana Asfahani (Center For Autism Research at King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Center, Riyadh ), Ohud Alhaqbani (Center For Autism Research at King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Center, Riyadh ), Rafat Mohtasib (Center For Autism Research at King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Center, Riyadh ), Hesham Aldhalaan (Center For Autism Research at King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Center, Riyadh ), Mitch Fryling (California State University, Los Angeles), SARAH MOHAMMED ALJASER (Center for Autism Research at King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Center, Riyadh)
Abstract: Abstract: Applied Behavior Analytic (ABA) services for children with autism in Saudi Arabia are presently scarce. Children with autism who could benefit from such services are unable to obtain them. Involving parents in the implementation of certain ABA techniques may help increasing the number of children who may benefit from the training. The present study evaluates the effects of a behavioral skills training package on parents implementation of discrete-trial teaching with their children with Autism Spectrum Disorder. Three mothers of children with autism participated in the study. The training package improved implementation for all three of the mothers. Moreover, these improvements generalized to skills that were not taught during training, maintained during follow-up probes, and resulted in improvements in child behavior. We discussed the implications of these outcomes in expanding the reach of the limited ABA resources in Saudi Arabia. Overall our results support pervious published studies using this behavioral skills training.
 
How Can Families Best Prepare Their Autistic Child for the Transition Into School?
Domain: Service Delivery
JONATHAN SAILER (Rochester Center for Autism), Jaclyn Burton (Rochester Center for Children)
Abstract: Objective Using a combination of case study and research we intend to present a best practice guide to helping families and professionals prepare for the transition from intensive services to a typical educational setting. Method In the examples included in my talk we will follow 3 different students as they transition from intensive one-on-one ABA therapy to a variety of more generalized settings. We will show step by step how the Rochester Center for Autism worked hand in hand with a local preschool, a local private school, and a local public school to help transition students into their next educational setting. Throughout the talk we will provide a review of literature surrounding best practice with regard to transitions into school in typical and special education. Results Because this is a guide more than a research project our results are very case specific. We will present the research, show how we adapted the research to meet each students needs, and then review the results for each student. Conclusion Because of the well-documented importance of the transition into a typical educational setting it is crucial that families are able to access well researched information. Rous stated Early transitions often set the stage for future positive or negative transition experiences. Professionals must work together to give our families the support they need.
 
 
 

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