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Association for Behavior Analysis International

The Association for Behavior Analysis International® (ABAI) is a nonprofit membership organization with the mission to contribute to the well-being of society by developing, enhancing, and supporting the growth and vitality of the science of behavior analysis through research, education, and practice.

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Ninth International Conference; Paris, France; 2017

Event Details

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Symposium #82
CE Offered: BACB
Effects of Systematically Reducing Physical Feedback to Decrease Aggressive Behavior and to Increase on-task Participation
Wednesday, November 15, 2017
11:30 AM–12:20 PM
Scene DEF, Niveau 0
Area: AUT
CE Instructor: Ana Bibay Fleisig, M.S.
Chair: Neal N. Fleisig (Professional Crisis Management, Inc.)
Abstract: The literature regarding the use of physical guidance in schools is scant, perhaps due to the controversial nature of the topic. The studies presented evaluate the effects of one component of a comprehensive treatment, systematic physical assistance and graduated fading of physical guidance to decrease aggressive behavior and to increase on-task participation in children with autism. A comprehensive review and discussion of several different physical guidance training packages were undertaken and a training package from the Professional Crisis Management Association (2002), referred to as Professional Crisis Management (PCM), was selected. The settings used for this evaluation were different public French ABA schools (managed by 2 different Associations). These schools provide services for children with autism ranging in age from 3 to 18 years old. This 4-day PCM training was chosen because: 1) it provides strong emphasis on prevention and de-escalation; 2) considerable time is spent training staff on managing disruptive but non-dangerous behaviors, something particularly applicable to the classroom setting; 3) it narrowly defines crisis as behaviors which are dangerously disruptive or continuously self-injurious or aggressive; 4) the training clearly states that physical assistance is not to be used for discipline or compliance; 5) the physical component of all procedures is both safe and as dignified as possible. Additionally, the PCM program also includes physical feedback designed to assist the student in learning that physical assistance is immediately and systematically reduced as a consequence of reductions in physical resistence . Data collected on two behaviors: on-task behavior and aggressive behavior
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Clinical Crisis Management and Behavioral Treatment: Strange Bedfellows
(Applied Research)
ANA BIBAY FLEISIG (IME MAIA - Paris, France & AVA - Paris, France)
Abstract: This presentation will discuss issues relevant to crisis management as they relate to individuals and organizations receiving and providing services to people with developmental disabilities. Traditionally, a chasm has existed between behavior analytic treatment and crisis intervention. Behavior analytic treatment is based on a scientific and systematic method of assessing, educating and treating individuals with developmental disabilities. Underpinning these strategies are the operant and functional nature of behavior, and an implicit commitment to expanding adaptive repertoires. Crisis intervention on the other hand has traditionally been void of critical behavioral thinking and often antagonistic to behavioral treatment. The recent focus, common among crisis programs, that conclude “anxiety” or “low arousal” should be the defining concept guiding crisis intervention accentuates these differences. This presentation will explore these inconsistences and offer alternative perspectives for a scientific and systematic behavior analytic approach to crisis intervention.
Effects of Systematically Reducing Physical Feedback to Decrease Aggressive Behavior and to increase on-task participation
(Applied Research)
SOPHIE VERHAEGE (Professional Crisis Management Ass.)
Abstract: The study was completed to evaluate the effects of systematically using and fading physical feedback to decrease aggressive behavior and to increase on-task participation for one child with autism. The setting is a French ABA school. This study includes a multiple baseline across teachers design. Baseline data was collected on two behaviors: on-task behavior and aggression. Aggressive behavior was defined as: (a) throwing and destroying objects; or (b) biting, hitting, scratching, or kicking other people. The student was considered on task when he was: (a) following the teacher's instructions; (b) orienting appropriately toward the teacher or task; or (c) seeking help in the proper manner (e.g., raising hand). Data were recorded in students classroom during 15 min of the class period as the students participated in the normal class activities. Data were collected once a day, using time sampling (30 seconds interval). A follow-up phase (6 months later) indicates that on-task behavior remains at high rates. Moreover, no aggressive behaviors were observed during this follow-up phase.
Decreasing Aggressive Behavior and Increasing Participation During Transitions
(Applied Research)
ERIKA HUERTA (Agir et Vivre l'Autisme - Paris, France)
Abstract: The study was completed to evaluate the effects of systematically using and fading physical feedback to decrease aggressive behavior and to increase on-task participation for students with autism during transitions This study includes a multiple baseline across teachers design. Students were considered on task when: (a) transitioning from point A to point B as instructed. Data were recorded in student's transitions, during 2 hours sessions with at least 10 opportunities for transitions. Data will be presented that includes baseline, treatment and follow-up conditions.
 

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